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INFANTS' HOSPITAL 




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FIFTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

For the Year 1938 



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EVELYN KNAPP HOLLINGSWORTH 
(Mrs. Amor Hollings worth) 

December 8, 1938 
Director since 1932 

A sympathetic, generous, and helpful 
friend of the Hospital. 



JULIUS EISEMANN 

January 18, 1939 
Director since 1921 

A generous, wise, and valued counsellor. 



FIFTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

1938 

INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 

Since 1881 the Infants' Hospital has provided medical 
treatment for infants without regard to race, creed, 
color or residence. 

Our Research Studies and the training and experience 
given to Doctors, Medical Students and Nurses may 
some day SAVE THE BABY IN YOUR OWN HOME. 

WHAT YOUR DOLLARS GIVE 

Light, heat, food, nurses and doctors for one baby 
for ... 

One day costs $4.00 

Seven days cost $28.00 

Twenty days cost $80.00 

One month costs $120.00 

$200 runs the whole hospital full of sick babies 

for one day. 

$6000 endows a memorial bed in perpetuity. 




A little thought, a bit of exercise 

Each move she makes is with complete surprise. 

[ 2 ] 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL DIRECTOR 



FIVE years ago when the daily census was cut to thirty-five infants for 
the purpose of lessening the cost of overhead expenses, the graduate 
nurse in charge of the Food Laboratory was dismissed. Because feeding is 
one of the most important features of the basic care of little infants, everyone 
realizes the necessity of having an experienced nurse who can give constant 
and continued supervision to the preparation and serving of their daily food. 
It is to be hoped that the many people interested in the welfare of sick babies 
will generously support the Infants' Hospital so that this and other needs 
may be met in the coming year. 

Again this year we see the relatively low death rate of fourteen per 
cent which compares favorably with that of 1937. However, the high mor- 
tality of babies dying within the first forty-eight hours after admission still 
remains too high. Over fifty per cent of the total number who succumbed 
did so shortly after reaching the hospital. This large number is a matter of 
grave concern. It should be reduced, particularly with so many means for 
preventing disease and with the rapidly increasing array of remedies which 
are effectively specific for particular diseases. 

As a consequence of the important survey during 1937-38, conducted 
for the purpose of finding means by which cross infections on the wards 
might be decreased, although there is, yet, much to be done, we learned that 
the "masking" of the personnel coming in contact with the babies served a 
most useful purpose. Therefore, "masks" will be continued throughout the 
seasonal incidence of respiratory disease during 1939. 

The new therapeutic remedies which were mentioned at some length 
in a former report apparently are standing the test of time. In addition to 
the serum treatment for the various types of pneumonia, a derivative of 
sulfanilamide or prontosil has come forth. This drug, called sulfo-pyridine, 
seems to be very effective and may replace the use of serum therapy. It is 
less expensive than serum. It can be given by mouth rather than by injec- 
tion into a vein, and so far, fewer disturbing reactions appear when it is 
used in an understanding manner. Favorable reports of this drug have 
appeared in the literature and studies with this end in view are already in 
progress at the Hospital. 

The changing emphasis in social work of centering attention around 
the patient as part of a family group, as well as an individual with a de- 
veloping personality, has gradually come into clearer focus. Thereby, in 
order to plan wisely for the treatment of these patients we need to know 
more about the social environment and emotional factors. The medical 

[ 3 ] 



social worker now makes a social study of each infant as early as possible 
after admission to the Hospital. In this way the interns and residents, armed 
with information which must be correlated with their medical studies, can 
plan for discharges and after-care long before the day arrives. The impor- 
tance of this early consideration of the whole problem becomes clearer when 
one realizes the many social problems which need adjustment for babies 
coming from so wide a geographical area. 

Investigations of the physiology of respiration are being pursued in the 
mechanical device installed in 1937. It is of interest to note that it is along 
such fundamental lines that our understanding of many of the baffling dis- 
eases is clarified, even though at the time there does not seem to be any 
practical application. 

In many reports attention has been given to the salutory effects of using 
water and salt as a remedy in the treatment of infants suffering from a 
lowered nutritional state caused by infection, congenital anomalies, dietary 
indiscretion, and so forth. To further the successful treatment of babies 
with such manifestations it would be most desirable to provide in addition 
to water and salt, other essential food substances directly into the veins, 
particularly during the critical phase of the disease. Sugar has already 
proved beneficial for this purpose. Recently a solution containing amino- 
acids, the component parts of protein, has become available and studies along 
this line are in progress. An ''artificial" food containing water, salts, sugar 
and protein, which could be injected intravenously, would take an important 
step in the treatment of these and many other diseases. 

A hitherto unrecognized disease affecting infants and children was 
observed during September and October. The clinical staff was at once 
aware that a new problem had presented itself. The usual thorough studies 
made on the wards permitted an accurate characterization of the clinical 
features of the disease, which will be of great value should subsequent out- 
breaks occur. The exact nature of the disease was determined by a post 
mortem examination of the first child who died and by subsequent animal 
inoculation studies. The disease was quickly established in mice by the 
pathology and bacteriology laboratories. Final identification of the offend- 
ing infectious agent as the virus which causes encephalitis in horses was 
accomplished with the co-operation of the Department of Bacteriology of 
the Harvard Medical School and the Rockefeller Institute. It w T ill be 
recalled that a large number of horses died of encephalitis in Massachusetts 
this past summer. In all, approximately thirty infants and children and 
adults suffered from this disease, and seven of these were admitted to the 
Infants' Hospital. The prompt recognition of this new malady illustrates 
the plan of organization in this Hospital, and the co-operation which is 
possible with outside laboratories and with the State Department of Health 
in mattera of general importance. 

These are examples of a few of the various research undertakings 
which are being carried on. 

[ 4 ] 




Rocking, rocking on my horse, 
On my way to health of course. 



[ 5 ] 



Miss Marion Story, social worker in the Infants' Hospital, resigned 
on September 1 after many faithful years of devoted service. Coming to 
the Hospital at a time when the outside community was inadequately 
organized to care for sick or convalescent babies, her knowledge of public 
health nursing together with her experience in social agencies contributed 
a valued service. 

Dr. B. W. Carey resigned this year to accept an appointment as 
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Wayne University Medical School 
in Detroit, in association with Dr. Cooley, and with Dr. Wilson who left 
us in 1937. The going away of physicians, who have received a large part 
of their training at the Infants' Hospital, to accept advanced positions else- 
where, while a great loss to us, signifies the fulfillment of one of the primary 
purposes of our work, — the training of men in special fields of medicine. 

Appreciation is expressed to the Director of the Hospital for his under- 
standing and helpfulness in making it possible to best meet the many prob- 
lems which arise in ministering to sick babies. We are grateful to the 
Ladies' Aid Society and to the Board of Directors of the Hospital for their 
continued support, and acknowledgment is made to the members of the 
nursing and medical star! and the social service worker, for their stimu- 
lating interest and co-operation in sharing the responsibilities of the medical 
care of patients, of research, and of teaching. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D., 

Medical Director. 




[ 6 ] 



REPORT OF THE HOSPITAL DIRECTOR 

RATHER than elaborate on the events of 1938 which do not seem to 
have been very unusual and which are well described elsewhere in 
this report, let us look on some of the difficulties that face the staff of the 
Infants' Hospital more or less constantly. 

The care of the child is a specialty in itself — a sick child is ten times 
more complicated, and the sick infant is again a still more intricate problem. 
Their inability to co-operate is one of the difficulties, but is an accepted fact 
which has to be met with constant progress in diagnostic methods. Rapid 
strides are being made in this field in the Infants' Hospital. 

The main difficulties that it is wished could be corrected, are primarily 
two in number. First and foremost, such a large percentage of infants are 
desperately ill by the time they reach the hospital. Parents naturally cannot 
readily recognize the early symptoms of illness, or if they do, they cannot 
differentiate between a minor upset and a serious symptom. Furthermore, 
they do not relish the idea of a hospital, or their baby being so far away 
from them, so they wait and hope it will turn out to be nothing serious. 

Nature is kind and powerful and it is only when nature fails to win 
out single-handed, that the parents finally become thoroughly alarmed and 
rush to a hospital. 

Alas, so often if they had only come a day or even a few hours sooner, 
much anguish, some tragedies., might be avoided. 

The matter of home environment is a big factor. Social agencies are 
doing much to improve conditions in this field, and the government aims to 
help too, so we may hope for less infants sick from exposure, from privation, 
from infection. 

But, the infant who has over-indulgent parents is as much of a problem 
as the one who is neglected. 

An infant may be non-co-operative because it cannot speak and because 
of its size it may seem insensible to its surroundings, and the manner in 
which it is handled, but one of our problems is the spoiled infant. They have 
temper tantrums, fits of obstinacy, which greatly increase the difficulties that 
must be overcome to bring the infant back to normal. 

Parents often admit that they have been over-indulgent and are deeply 
grateful to the nurses when we are able to discharge their child — not only 
improved in health, but imbued with a greater sense of balance and self- 
control. 

This requires great skill, great patience, and deep understanding on 
the part of our nurses. 

Day after day, night after night, there are on an average of over thirty 
infants to be cared for, each one is a different problem and has to be handled, 
mentally and physically, as its needs demand. 

The doctors prescribe, the nurses have to win the confidence and 
co-operation of the infant in order to carry out many of the procedures. 

Anyone who has had the privilege of working in the Infants' Hospital 
has learned patience and "he that hath patience may compass anything." 

G. v. L. Meyer, Hospital Director 

[ 7 ] 




MEDICAL STATISTICS 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital Dec. 31, 1937 

Number of patients admitted during the year 1938 

Number of patients discharged during the }'ear 1938 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital Dec. 31, 1938 



27 




723 






716 




34 



750 750 



Number of patients — weekly rate — $24.50 to $35.00 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $24.50 81 

Number of patients — reduced rate per wk. — 50c to $24.50 618 

Number of patients — free 24 

Total number of Hospital days 12,940 

Average number of patients daily 35+ 

Average days' stay 18+ 

DISCHARGED 

Relieved 504 

Unrelieved 37 

Transferred to other hospitals 64 

Discharged on parents' own responsibility or against advice 6 

Died 1 05 ( 1 4% ) 



716 



Total 

34 died in a few hours 
10 died in less than 24 hours 
9 died in less than 48 hours 
50.4% died in less than 48 hours. 

G. vox L. Meyer, 

Director. 

[ 8 ] 



REPORT OF NURSING SERVICE 



THE School of Nursing of the Children's Hospital has begun its fiftieth 
year. The association of the School with the Infants' Hospital began 
forty-one years ago when senior students were sent on an affiliation to the 
West End Nursery. This affiliation continued until 1901 when a ward was 
opened in the Children's Hospital for sick babies. The relationship was 
resumed on May 1st, 1923, when the School of Nursing became responsible 
for the Infants' Hospital and the arrangements of affiliations. In addition 
to the students from the Children's Hospital, students from four hospitals 
received part of their experience at the Infants' Hospital. As experience in 
an infants' division only is not accepted by the State Boards of Registration 
as an adequate experience in Pediatrics, during the years since that time the 
schedule had to be readjusted. Now students from fifteen schools, in addi- 
tion to our School, have experience at the Infants' Hospital. 
The statistical report for 1938 is as follows: 

Dailv Average 
Off L. O. A. 

Daily Average Daily Average (following 
on Duty Off 111 illness) 

Graduate Staff* 7.504 .099 .023 

Student Nurses 22.171 .852 .126 

Attendants 3.804 .066 .014 

*Also special nurse to assist with research November 11 to December 31 

There has been a great variety in the types of illnesses at Infants' 
Hospital this year, and the student nurses have had the opportunity to 
obtain a variety of experience in the observation of symptoms and care of 
infants with medical diseases. During the winter months we have a good 
deal of pneumonia and have had as many as four oxygen tents in use at one 
time. Many extra hours of nursing care have also been required due to the 
use of serum therapy in the treatment of pneumonia. Frequently the be- 
havior problems of the children who come to us require as much time and 
attention as the disease, so that we try to teach student nurses not only the 
principles of the nursing care of infants and young children, but also the 
principles of habit training which will help babies to develop into normal 
happy children. 

We have also attempted to develop a plan this year for giving senior 
nurses experience in the Premature Nursery. Unfortunately our census of 
students has not made it possible for us to do this consistently. The small 
number of Children's Hospital students, old enough in the School to have 
their affiliation in infant care, has made it necessary to reduce the number 
of Children's Hospital students at Infants' Hospital by two. This has been 

[ 9 ] 



a difficult adjustment for the staff at Infants' Hospital, but we are hoping 
shortly to replace them by affiliating students. 

While our personnel has remained approximately the same for four or 
five years and on paper looks like an adequate staff for the number of 
patients, we are constantly aware of some of the inadequacies of the service. 
Reduction in the number of patients on the service does not necessarily 
mean that there can be like reduction in personnel, since our staff has always 
been more nearly minimum than optimum. Scientific means are being de- 
veloped for the saving of life, but every new treatment introduced seems to 
bring with it an increase in the amount of nursing service necessary, because 
many of these treatments are potentially dangerous and entail constant 
vigilance. 

The schedule of assignments of students so that they will have an 
adequate experience is very complex and takes considerable time. The bulk 
of this work is done in the School of Nursing Office, but the daily adjust- 
ments must be made by the Supervisor. The nursing care of patients must 
be supervised, the ward teaching program for student nurses must be car- 
ried on, and many hours must be spent in the formal teaching rounds for 
medical students. When the census was cut several years ago we made a 
reduction in the personnel, and the Milk Laboratory nurse was omitted, 
and this responsibility delegated to the nurse who took care of the pre- 
mature babies. Obviously this is not a good system where we have student 
nurses who must have experience in the Milk Laboratory. There is a con- 
stant shifting of students, and the only stable full-time person in the Milk 
Laboratory is the attendant. The graduate nurse changes because she has 
to take her turn on night duty. On the basis of present-day standards of 
teaching student nurses, we are falling far short in this matter. There 
should be one person who is responsible for the procedures in the Milk 
Laboratory and who can go out on the wards during feeding time and teach 
the students, as well as give oversight to the feeding of patients. There is 
a pressing need for another graduate nurse to assume these responsibilities. 

We appreciate the continued interest of the Ladies' Aid Committee 
in the School and Nursing Staff. 

Stella Goostray, 

Superintendent of Nurses. 



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p^'m-M00-'- : f-. 









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Look here, I say, dear nurse so kind, 
My breakfast please, if you don't mind. 



[ 11 ] 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



DURING the year 1938 this department suffered a change of social 
worker for the first time in fourteen years. Miss Story resigned on 
September 1, and Mrs. Woolley was assigned to the work here. Miss Story 
made a significant contribution to the medical-social care of infants at a 
time when the community agencies outside the hospital were not ready or 
able to co-operate with the care of infants on discharge. It was necessary 
then to have someone with a public health nursing point of view keep in 
constant touch with the family to be sure that after care was adequate. In 
these days, however, with so much nursing care available in the community, 
the emphasis of the social worker in Infants' has shifted to the social prob- 
lems, and her chief function is to facilitate adequate medical care by inter- 
pretation and adjustment of the social factors. 

Some contact is made with the family of each patient admitted to the 
Infants' Hospital. This does not necessitate a home visit in every instance. 
Some less complex situations can be talked over with the parents on a visit- 
ing day, and satisfactory plans worked out at that time. Direct services 
involving such help as the visiting nurse, Red Cross transportation, and 
donation of clothing are frequently sufficient. Many of our problems, how- 
ever, require a visit to the home and co-operation with other community 
agencies. These are the situations that occupy much of the time and best 
exemplify the interdependence of the medical and social factors in illness. 
The presentation of a few actual histories might illustrate most clearly this 
relationship. 

A six-months' old baby was recently admitted with an acute nutritional 
disturbance. Her mother stated shortly after admission that she had no 
means of supporting the baby as her husband had recently been sent to 
prison, so she had taken the baby to her mother, who was also in poor 
financial circumstances. Another occupant of the home was suspected of 
having tuberculosis. The immediate problem embraced both an effort to 
arrange financial aid in order to insure the necessary diet for the baby, and 
to eliminate the possibility of exposing the baby to tuberculosis. 

A premature baby weighing only four pounds was recently brought to 
our nursery. The mother, a young, inexperienced girl, had married a 
widower who had two small children by his former marriage. They had 
joined the household only a short time before the birth of our patient, hav- 
ing previously been with relatives. These children proved to be more than 
the young wife could possibly handle at this time. She feared that the situa- 
tion would become worse upon the baby's return from the hospital, yet she 
could see no way of making other plans. The worker was able to arrange 

[ 12 ] 



for the two older children to return to relatives for the time being, and for 
close supervision by the Visiting Nurse of the baby's care at home upon 
discharge. 

A baby, aged four months, was admitted because of infected ears and 
acute bronchitis. The attending doctors believed that poor home conditions 
were partially responsible for the infection. Investigation showed the home 
to be infested with insects and rodents and without adequate plumbing or 
heating. It was essential that a change be made in these conditions before 
our patient could leave the hospital. A second child of the family was also 
in the hospital with a severe disease of the kidneys. The family had abso- 
lutely no means of moving without financial assistance. 

During the past year 308 cases have received social service aid. The 
present study is aimed to obtain figures not only to show the total number 
of cases served, but also to provide a definite classification as to the various 
types of service rendered in proportion to the medical social factors 
involved. 

Amy W. Greene, 

Director. 






OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1939 



President 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH 

197 Commonwealth Avenue 

Secretary 

HENRY W. PALMER 

10 State Street 

Treasurer 

PHILIP STOCKTON 

67 Milk Street 



Directors 



Mrs. F. I. Amory 

Lincoln Baylies 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 

Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Hasket Derby 

Charles Devens 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder II 



Mrs. Gelston T. King 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George von L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 
Philip Stockton 
Mrs: Philip Stockton 
Mrs. S. D. Warren 






Philip Stockton 



Finance Committee 
Lincoln Baylies 



Charles M. Rotch 



Hospital Director 
George von L. Meyer 



Medical Director 
Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D. 



Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



CONSULTANTS 



PJiysicians 
William H. Howell, M.D. 
John Lovett Morse, M.D. 
Fritz B. Talbot, M.D. 



Otolaryngologist 
D. Crosby Greene, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 

Edward C. Vogt, M.D. 
Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. 



[ 1-!- ] 



ACTIVE STAFF 



(For the academic year — 1938-39) 

Physicians 

Bronson Crothers, M.D. Richard M. Smith, M.D. 

James L. Gamble, M.D. Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 

Charles F. McKhann, M.D. Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 

Associate Physicians 



Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
Randolph K. Byers, M.D. 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Surgeon 
William E. Ladd, M.D. 

Associates 

Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 
Franc Ingraham, M.D. 

Pathologist 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 

Associate 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

Otolaryngologist 
Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 

Associates 

Charles Allman, M.D. 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 
Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 
Philip Mysel, M.D. 

Assistants 
John R. Frazee, M.D. 
Edgar M. Holmes, M.D. 

Research Associate Laryngologist 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

Psychologist 
Elizabeth E. Lord, Ph.D. 

Supervisor of Nursing 
Miss Harriet Russell, R.N. 



Residents 



David H. Clement, M.D. 



Louis K. Diamond, M.D. 
R. Cannon Eley, M.D. 
LeRoy D. Fothergill, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. 

Associate 
William T. Green, M.D. 

Bacteriologist 
Hans Zinsser, M.D. 

Associates 
LeRoy D. Fothergill, M.D. 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist 
J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 

Associates 
Paul Chandler, M.D. 
Edwin B. Goodall, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 

Associate 
Austin W. Cheever, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
George M. Wyatt, M.D. 

Associate 
Hugh F. Hare, M.D. 

Social Service 
Miss Amy Greene 

Social Service Worker 
Mrs. Paul V. Woolley, Jr. 

Edward C. Curnen, M.D. 



Ralph A. Ross, M.D. 
House Officers 



Allen M. Hill, M.D. 
Charles H. Cutler, M.D. 
Wilson M. Wing, M.D. 



Glidden L. Brooks, M.D. 
Henry H. Work, M.D. 
Donald E. Nitchman, M.D. 



[ 15 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 1939 



Chairman 
MRS. ERNEST B. DANE, Jr. 

V ice-Chairmen 
MRS. WILLIAM E. LADD MRS. FREDERICK M. DEARBORN, Jr. 

MRS. HAMILTON OSGOOD 

Treasurer 
MRS. CHARLES E. CHANNING 

Secretary 
MISS SUSAN H. BREWER 

Assistant Secretary 
MISS ANNE HOUGHTON 

Committee in Charge of Nurses' Teas 
MRS. CHARLES C. CUNNINGHAM 

Entertainment Committee 
MRS. F. WADSWORTH BUSK 

House Committee Visiting Committee 

MRS. EDMUND S. KELLEY, Jr. MRS. FORRESTER A. CLARK 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE FINANCIAL REPORT 

MISS BARBARA BREMER, Treasurer 

January 1st, 1938 to January 1st, 1939 

RECEIPTS 

Balance in Bank January 1st, 1938 $ 481.81 

Dues Received 740.00 

Proceeds of Concert, including donations 1,990.68 

Donations: 

Benny Goodman $ 200.00 

Mrs. Fessenden 25.00 

Mrs. Hollingsworth 25.00 

Mrs. E. B. Dane, Sr 10.00 

Mrs. Geleston King 16.00 

Mrs. Richardson 5.00 

Mrs. Busk 5.Q0 

Miss Ida C. Smith 5.00 

Total Receipts $3,212.49 

EXPENSES 

Two beds to Hospital $1,200.00 

Materials and Supplies for Hospital including $316.57 for 

bl ankets ". ,. 9 1 9.46 

Social Service Workers 

Marion B. Story, 8 months 288.16 

Margaret Woolley, 4 months 10.08 

298.24 

Printing and Postage 149.77 

Advertising, Miss O'Brion 200.00 

Amy Greene Emergency Fund 50.00 

Total Expenses $2,817.47 

Balance in Bank January 1, 1939 395.02 

$3,212.49 
[ 16 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE — ANNUAL REPORT 



THE Ladies' Aid Committee has as usual met regularly throughout the 
past year. Members have attended faithfully and have shown much 
interest in the Hospital. 

The Gardner House teas for the Nurses have been continued with 
much success, particularly so the Christmas Tea on December 15th for 
which Al Zimmerman and his Orchestra provided the music, and also a 
ventriloquist to entertain us. I wish to mention that Mr. Zimmerman gave 
the whole entertainment free of charge, for which we are exceedingly 
grateful. The Christmas tree and gifts provided much amusement for 
everyone and it was a very jolly occasion. 

To return to events earlier in the year, on May 1st the Committee 
gave a concert at the Symphony Hall for the benefit of the Infants' Hospital 
at which Benny Goodman and his Orchestra provided the entertainment 
and made the Hall ring with Swing. The net profit for the evening, itf 
eluding a donation from Mr. Goodman, was the sum of $1861.16 wit| 
which the Committee was able to endow two beds in the Hospital, with 
the hope of giving one more later. 

In April we had the fortune of hearing Miss Greene of the Infants' 
Hospital talk on that most important factor in modern medical care, Social 
Welfare Work. 

We are fortunate in having again Miss O'Brien as publicity agent for 
the Infants' Hospital and its work. 

In November we decided to join the Welfare Committee in giving six 
teas for the Women's Club during the ensuing year. None of the details of 
the teas have as yet been decided on. 

During the past year but few members have resigned and our numbers 
have been added to by several new active members. 

We hope that during the year 1939 we shall be able to help the 
Hospital in every way possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Susan Brewer, 

Secretary. 



[ 17 ] 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



PHILIP STOCKTON, TREASURER 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1938 



ASSETS 



Cash $ 435.25 

General Funds, Investments 456,643.22 

Permanent Funds, Investments 262,478.46 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr., Memorial Hospital and 
Equipment „ 145,451.40 

Total Assets $865,008.33 



LIABILITIES 

General Funds $453,961.78 

Permanent Funds 271,063.75 

Total Funds $725,025.53 

Less Deficit in Income and Expense Account 5,468.60 719,556.93 

Hospital and Equipment Fund 145,451.40 

Total Liabilities $865,008.33 



TOTAL CASH RECEIPTS AND CASH PAYMENTS 

FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1938 

Receipts: 

Cash balance from last year $ 8,777.68 

Account of Income and Expense _ $ 77,509.18 

Investments sold and matured 10,650.00 

Bequest of Mary E. Leckie 1,063.67 

From Beverly Real Estate 125.00 

Total Receipts 8 9, 347.8 5 

Total Cash 98,125.53 

Payments: 

On account of Income and Expense $ 82,977.78 

Investments purchased 14,712.50 

Total Payments 97,690.28 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1938 $ 435.25 

[ 18 ] 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1938 



RECEIPTS 

Community Federation of Boston „ $ 23,498.90 

Other Donations - 1,053.00 

Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund, Inc 2,000.00 

Ladies' Aid Committee for Free Bed 1,400.00 

A. C. Ratchesky Foundation 200.00 

E. F. Fay Estate Income 200.00 

Income from Investments 32,867.94 « 

Total Receipts $ 61,219.84 



PAYMENTS 

Children's Hospital $ 77,837.11 

Less Credits 16,289.34 

61,547.77 

Salaries 2,300.04 

Pension 404.00 

Boston Transcript 624.00 

Auditing Hospital and Treasurer's Account 250.00 

1,000 Annual Reports - 195.00 

Printing and Postage 62.63 

Vault Rent Plus Tax 55.00 

Insurance 250.00 

Other Publicity Expenses 500.00 

Balance due on Air Condition Plant 500.00 



Total PaymexMts $ 66,688.44 

Excess of Payments over Receipts for year ending 

December 31^ 1938 $ 5,468.60 



REPORT OF AUDITOR 

I have examined the Treasurer's accounts of the Infants' Hospital for the year 
ending December 31, 1938, and certify the cash on hand December 31, 1938, has been 
verified with The First National Bank; that an examination of the securities kept in 
The First National Bank vaults has been made and found correct. The income called 
for by the investments has been received, and payments are supported by checks 
returned through the bank endorsed by tke payee or by other vouchers. 

Richard Pope, 

Auditor. 



[ 19 ] 



SCHEDULE 1 "A" 

List of Investments Belonging to General Funds 
December 31, 1938 

BONDS Due 

American Radiator-Standard Sanitary Co 1947 

Arkansas Power & Light Co 1956 

Boston & Maine R.R 1967 

Boston & Maine R.R 1942 

Chicago Junction Rys _ 1940 

Consolidation Coal Company 1960 

Government of Dominion of Canada 1952 

Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range R.R 1962 

International Paper Co 1955 

Jersey Central Pr. & Lt. Co 1961 

Maine Central R.R 1945 

New York Central R.R 1946 

North Boston Lighting Cos 1947 

Penn. Power & Light Co 1951 

Potomac Edison Co 1961 

Safe Harbor Water Power Co 1979 

Saguenay Power Co., Ltd 1966 

Shawinigan Water & Power Co 1967 

Southern Railway Co. Gen. Mtg 1956 

United Stock Yds. Corp 1951 

Western Maryland R.R 1977 

Western Mass. Companies 1946 

Total 



STOCKS 

American & Foreign Pr. Co. Pfd 100 shares $ 5,000.00 

American Sugar Refining Co. Pfd 100 shares 12,625.25 

American Super Power Co., Pfd 200 shares 19,865.00 

American Tel. & Tel. Co., Com 117 shares 21,847.30 

Arkansas Power & Light Pfd 100 shares 5,000.00 

Central Maine Power Co., Pfd 200 shares 21,000.00 

Consolidation Coal Co., Pfd 30 shares — — 

Consolidation Coal Co., Com „ 120 shares — — 

Draper Corporation, Com 875 shares 47,673.75 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Assoc. 6% Pfd 200 shares 18,600.00 

Elec. Bond & Share Sec. Co., Com 87 shares 2,000.00 

Elec. Bond & Share Co. $5 Pfd 100 shares 9,223.61 

Elec. Bond & Share Co. $6 Pfd 100 shares 10,750.00 

General Electric Co. Com 800 shares 29,600.00 

General Motors Corp. 5% Pfd 100 shares 12,025.26 

Illinois Central R.R. Pfd 100 shares 11,215.00 

International Match Realization Co 20 shares 576.71 

Nashua Mfg. Co. 1st Pfd 100 shares 6,000.00 

Nashua Mfg. Co. 2nd Pfd .-. 100 shares 4,100.00 

Saco-Lowell Shops Class A Pfd 150 shares 4,000.00 

Saco-Lowell Shops Common 150 shares 1,000.00 

Southern Pacific R.R. Common 100 shares 5,000.00 

Union Pacific R.R. Pfd 100 shares 8,002.50 

United Drug, Inc 40 shares 480.00 

United Fruit Co 100 shares 8,020.20 

United States Steel Co 100 shares 10,000.00 





Pat- 


Book 


Rate 


Value 


Value 


4i/4 


$ 5,000 


$ 5,246.14 


3 


10,000 


9,575.00 


5 


10,000 


9,325.00 


5 


6,000 


6,180.00 


5 


6,000 


5,940.00 


5 


4,000 


1,000.00 


5 


10,000 


9,950.00 


3 T / 2 


10,000 


9,800.00 


6 


10,000 


9,962.50 


4*/ 2 


10,000 


10,075.00 


4 


5,000 


5,000.00 


33X 


10,000 


9,800.00 


3 J / 2 


10,000 


10,000.00 


4*4 


10,000 


9,650.00 


4 J / 2 


10,000 


9,950.00 


4 J / 2 


10,000 


9,691.25 


4# 


10,000 


10,000.00 


4^4 


20,000 


12,393.75 


6 


10,000 


9,650.00 


4 1 / 


10,000 


9,800.00 


sy 2 


5,000 


4,987.50 


334 


5,000 


5,062.50 




$183,038.64 



Total $273,604.58 

TOTAL GENERAL FUNDS INVESTMENTS $456,643.22 

[ 20] 



SCHEDULE 1 "B" 

List of Investments Belonging to Permanent Funds 

December 31, 1938 

BONDS Due 

Armour & Co 1955 

Carolina Power & Lt. Co 1956 

Central Pacific R.R - 1949 

Central R.R. of Georgia 1959 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Assoc 1956 

Florida Power & Light Co 1954 

Great Northern R.R. Co 1973 

Illinois Power and Light Co 1953 

Lexington & Eastern R.R 1965 

National Steel Co 1965 

N. Y. Central & Hudson R.R _ 1997 

N. Y. Central & Hudson R.R 1998 

N. Y., N. H. & Hartford R.R 1947 

N. Y., N. H. & Hartford R.R 1948 

New England Power Assoc 1954 

New York Power & Light Co 1967 

Northern States Power Co 1967 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co 1964 

Public Service Co. of No. Ill 1980 

United Drug Company 1953 

Wabash R.R 1975 

Lawyers Mortgage Investment Trust 1938 

Ohio Power Co 1952 

Total $185,588.57 





Pat- 


Book 


Rate 


Value 


Value 


4 


$10,000 


$ 9,850.00 


5 


10,000 


10,400.00 


4 


5,000 


5,012.50 


5 


10,000 


5,000.00 


4 


10,000 


9,650.00 


5 


10,000 


9,525.00 


5 


10,000 


9,250.00 


6 


10,000 


9,850.00 


5 


3,000 


2,977.50 


4 


4,000 


4,020.00 


3^ 


5,000 


4,400.00 


3 J / 2 


5,000 


4,800.00 


4 


6,000 


6,480.00 


6 


2,500 


2,462.74 


sy 2 


20,000 


19,000.00 


41/2 


10,000 


9,687.50 


33/4 


10,000 


9,537.50 


4 


5,000 


5,100.00 


4 J /£ 


10,000 


10,075.00 


5 


20,000 


18,910.83 


sy 2 


12,000 


6,000.00 


5 


10,000 


4,000.00 


5 


10,000 


9,600.00 



STOCKS 

Aluminum Co. of Amer. 67c Pfd 100 shares $10,712.50 

Boston & Albany R.R. Co _ 15 shares 3,070.00 

Duquesne Lighting Co. 57c 1st Pfd 100 shares 9,750.00 

Boston Edison Co 100 shares 15,981.95 

Electric Bond & Share Co. Pfd. 6% 100 shares 10,325.00 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co 7 shares 449.14 

Pennsylvania R.R 200 shares 10,000.00 

Puget" Sound Pr. & Lt. Co. P. Pr. Pfd 85 shares 7,613.17 

Puget Sound Trac, Lt. & Pr. Co. Pfd 25 shares 2,581.25 

Quincv Market Cold Storage Co., Pfd 16 shares 1,600.00 

Union Pacific R.R. Co., Com 25 shares 3,000.00 

United Corporation, Pfd 35 shares 1,806.88 



Total $ 76,889.89 

TOTAL PERMANENT FUND INVESTMENTS $262,478.46 



L 21 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 
Mrs. Timothee Adamowski 
Mrs. Charles F. Adams, Jr. 
Mrs. R. L. Agassiz 
Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 
Miss Olivia Ames 
Mrs. Francis I. Amory 
Mrs. Harcourt Amory, Jr. 
Mrs. J. Austin Amory 
Mrs. Talbot Baker 
Mrs. James O. Bangs 
Miss Julia A. Barbour 
Mrs. B. Devereux Barker 
Mrs. J. C. Bassett 
Mrs. Walter C. Baylies 
Mrs. T. P. Beal, Jr. 
Mrs. Wm. DeFord Beal 
Mrs. Arthur M. Beale 
Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 
Mrs. K. D. Blackfan 
Mrs. Thomas S. Blumer 
Mrs. John F. Bradley 
Miss Barbara Bremer 
Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 
Miss Elsie C. Brewer 
Miss Susan H. Brewer 
Mrs. Gorham Brooks 
Mrs. Davenport Brown 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 
Mrs. Edmund J. Burke 
Mrs. F. M. Burnham 
Miss Nina Burnham 
Mrs. F. Wads worth Busk 
Mrs. Samuel Cabot 
Miss Nancy Cassels 
Mrs. William Caswell 
Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 
Mrs. Charles E. Channing 
Mrs. Theodore Chase 
Mrs. F. C. Church, Jr. 
Mrs. Forrester A. Clark 
Mrs. Henry C. Clark 
Mrs. Nathaniel T. Clark 
Mrs. R. F. Clark 
Mrs. R. J. Clark 
Mrs. Charles P. Clifford 
Mrs. Sargent F. Collier 
Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 
Mrs. T. J. Coolidge, Jr. 



Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield 
Mrs. Charles C. Cunningham 
Mrs. Edward Cunningham 
Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 
Mrs. Edward Dane 
Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 
Mrs. Richard E. Danielson 
Mrs. Frederick M. Dearborn, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles Devens 
Mrs. William Dexter 
Mrs. Frederick W. Eaton 
Mrs. Samuel Eliot 
Mrs. John M. Elliott 
Miss Josephine Emery 
Mrs. Clark Emmet 
Mrs. Robert W. Emmons 
Mrs. Marshall Fabyan, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert Faxon 
Mrs. William S. Febiger 
Mrs. Lawrence Foster 
Mrs. Donald McKay Frost 
Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 
Mrs. Theodore Frothingham, Jr. 
Mrs. George P. Gardner, Jr. 
Mrs. Harrison Gardner 
Mrs. Wallace Goodrich 
Mrs. Francis C. Gray 
Mrs. Henry V. Greenough 

Mrs. James C. Greenway, Jr. 

Mrs. H. S. Grew 

Mrs. Henry R. Guild 

Mrs. John L. Hall 

Mrs. John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Paul Hamlen 

Mrs. Huntington R. Hardwick 

Mrs. Richard Harte 

Mrs. Jolin Heard, Sr. 

Mrs. Robert F. Herrick, Jr. 

Mrs. Christian A. Herter 

Mrs. Francis S. Hill 

Mrs. John Hoar 

Mrs. C. E. Hodges, Jr. 

Mrs. Amor Hollingsworth, Jr. 

Mrs. Valentine Hollingsworth 

Mrs. John Homans 

Miss Anne Houghton 

Mrs. Charles Hovey 

Miss Phyllis Howe 



[ 22 ] 



Mrs. Osborne Howes Mrs. 

Mrs. James M. Hunnewell Mrs. 

Mrs. G. N. Hurd Mrs. 

Mrs. Mark Jouett Mrs. 

Mrs. Edmund S. Kelley, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. William Kemble Mrs. 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder II Miss 

Mrs. Franklin King Mrs. 

Mrs. Gelston T. King Mrs. 

Mrs. Alexander H. Ladd, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. William E. Ladd Mrs. 

Mrs. G. M. Lane Mrs. 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence Mrs. 

Miss Luisita A. Leland Miss 

Mrs. David M. Little Mrs. 

Mrs. Dunbar Lockwood Mrs. 

Mrs. Charles E. Mason, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. Frederick S. Mead Mrs. 

Mrs. James Means Mrs. 

Mrs. Houghton Metcalf Miss 

Mrs. Charles G. Mixter, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. J. Lothrop Motley Mrs. 

Mrs. Richard Olney Mrs. 

Mrs. Hamilton Osgood Mrs. 

Mrs. Franklin H. Palmer Mrs. 

Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. Augustine H. Parker, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. Francis S. Parker Mrs. 

Mrs. Frederick Parker Mrs. 

Mrs. W. A. Parker Mrs. 

Mrs. Marc Peter, Jr. Mrs. 

Mrs. Andrew J. Peters Miss 

Mrs. Carleton Pike Miss 

Mrs. Brooks Potter Mrs. 

Mrs. George Putnam Mrs. 

Mrs. Winthrop Pyemont Mrs. 

Mrs. H. G. Reynolds Miss 

Mrs. Homer B. Richardson Mrs. 

Mrs. J. Hampden Robb Mrs. 

Mrs. Frederick B. Robinson Mrs. 

Mrs. Sherwood Rollins Mrs. 

Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch Mrs. 
Mrs. William A. Russell 



Henry B. Saw t yer 
H. E. Sawyer 
Hugh D. Scott 
Philip S. Sears 
Richard D. Sears, Jr. 
Louis A. Shaw 
Rosemary Shaw 
S. Parkman Shaw 

F. Foster Sherburne 
Stephen W. Sleeper 
C Wharton Smith 
Richard M. Smith 
William S. Spaulding 
Faith Stanwood 
Philip Stockton 
Charles M. Storey 
Richard C. Storey 
Richard C. Storey, Jr. 
George H. Swift 
Lucille Swift 

Fritz B. Talbot 
Thomas C. Thacher, Jr. 
Warren Thayer 
Bayard Tuckerman, Jr. 
John A. Tuckerman 
Bayard Warren 
Fanny C. Warren 
Samuel D. Warren 
Donald C. Watson 
Francis C. Welch 
George S. Weld 
Priscilla A. Weld 
Dorothy West 
E. A. Whitney 
Norton Wigglesworth 

G. Herbert Windeler 
Katherine Winthrop 
Nathaniel T. Winthrop 
Roger Wolcott 

S. H. Wolcott 
S. H. Wolcott, Jr. 
William S. Youngman 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Mrs. Charles F. Richardson Miss Ida C. Smith 

Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley Mrs. George E. Warren- 

Mrs. Charles Harrington 



[ 23 ] 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



Mrs. Rodolphe L. Agassiz 
Mrs. Thomas Allen 
Mrs. F. I. Amory 
Mrs. Larz Anderson* 

Mrs. Matthew Bartlett 
Mrs. Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 
Lincoln Baylies 
Mrs. Walter C. Baylies 
Arthur M. Beale 
Mrs. Stoughton Bell 
Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 
Dr. K. D. Blackfan 
Mrs. E. A. Boardman 
Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley 
Mrs. Theodore G. Bremer 
Mrs. Edmund J. Burke 

Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 
Mrs. John R. Chapin 
Mrs. David Cheever 
Mrs. Arthur E. Childs 
Mrs. R. F. Clark 
Mrs. R. J. Clark 
Miss E. N. Converse 
Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 
Mrs. Allen Curtis 
Mrs. E. R. Curtis 
Mrs. Louis Curtis 
Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 
Miss Alice DeFord 
Hasket Derby 
Charles Devens 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 
Mrs. P. V. R. Ely 

Mrs. Allan Forbes 

F. Murray Forbes 

Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 

Mrs. William A. Gaston 

Mrs. John L. Hall 
John M. Hall 
Mrs. P. M. Hamlen 
Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 
Mrs. Charles Harrington 
Mrs. John Heard 
Mrs. F. L. Higginson 
Mrs. John Homans 
Mrs. Osborne Howes 
f. w. hunnewell 
Mrs. H. S. Hunnewell 

Mrs. M. V. Iasigi 
Miss E. K. Ide 



Mrs. James Jackson 
Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 

Mrs. Kaul F. Kauffmann 
Mrs. Alfred Kidder II 
Mrs. M. M. Kimball 
Mrs. Gelston T. King 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Rev. William Lawrence 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
Louis K. Liggett 
Mrs. R. W. Lovett 

Mrs. Roger B. Merrlman 
Mr. George von L. Meyer 
Mrs. F. S. Meyer 
Dr. John Lovett Morse . 
Mrs. E. Preble Motley 

Mrs. Roland W. Nickerson 

P. A. O'Connell 

Mrs. H. W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. F. S. Parker 

Mrs. Charles A. Rheault 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 

Mrs. S. A. Sargent 
Mrs. Henry R. Scott 
Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 
Mrs. Philip S. Sears 
Robert W. Seymour 
S. Parkman Shaw, Jr. 
Mrs. William Sheafe 
Mrs. G. W. Simmons 
Mrs. Carl S. Stillman 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Philip Stockton 

Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 
Mrs. John F. Tarbell 
Mrs. T. C. Thacher 
Mrs. Augustus Thorndike 
Miss E. M. Tower 
Mrs. Henry Tudor 

Mrs. F. Warren 
Mrs. S. D. Warren 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 
Mrs. G. H. Windeler 



[ 24 ] 



1938 CONTRIBUTIONS 



Abbott, Mrs. Gordon „ $ 25.00 

Abbott, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon, Jr. 100.00 

Adams, Miss Ethelind 25.00 

Agassiz, Mrs. R. L 50.00 

Agoos, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon 100.00 

Aldrich, William T 35.00 

Aldrich, Mrs. William T 50.00 

Allan, Mrs. Bryce J „ 100.00 

Ames, Mr. and Mrs. John S., Jr.... 100.00 

Ames, Mrs. Oliver 25.00 

Amorv, Mr. and Mrs. Francis I.... 50.00 

Atkins, Mrs. Edwin F „ 10.00 

Aver, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F 150.00 

Baer, Mrs. Louis 10.00 

Baker, Miss Hattie M 2.00 

Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Roland M.... 5.00 

Baldwin, Mrs. George S 5.00 

Barlow, Miss Mary L 25.00 

Barbour, Miss Julia A _ 5.00 

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. Joel M 10.00 

Barnet, Mrs. Howard J 5.00 

Barnet, Solomon J 5.00 

Bartol, Dr. and Mrs. John W 10.00 

Baxter, Mrs. Gregory Paul „ 10.00 

Beal, Miss Edith L. 5.00 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P 150.00 

Beebe, Mrs. Junius 25.00 

Bemis, Mrs. A. F 25.00 

Bemis, Albert Farwell Family 

Trust .". 1 5.00 

Bennett, Harold 20.00 

Bidwell, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond B. 10.00 

Bigelow, Mrs. Henry Forbes „ 100.00 

Blake, Mrs. Arthur W 10.00 

Blake, Mrs. George B 20.00 

Blumer, Mrs. Thomas S 25.00 

Bowden, Mrs. Herbert L 20.00 

Bradlee, Frederick J 10.00 

Bradlee, Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. 25.00 

Bradley, Mrs. Ralph ........ 10.00 

Bremer, Miss Barbara 50.00 

Bremer, Miss Sarah F 25.00 

Brewer, Miss Susan H 5.00 

Brown, Mrs. Edwin P 25.00 

Brown, Mrs. William H 20.00 

Buff, Miss Alice E 5.00 

Burgess, John K 5.00 

Burgess, Mrs. Theodore P _ 10.00 

Burke, Mrs. Edmund J 5.00 

Busk, Mr. and Mrs. F. Wadsworth 15.00 

Cabot, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 10.00 

Campbell, Mrs. Wallace M 10.00 

Carter, John & Co., Inc 5.00 

Cave, Dr. and Mrs. Edwin F 25.00 

Chamberlain, Geo. N. (deceased) 50.00 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Sharlie 25.00 

''In Memory of Marion Gay 

Chamberlain" _ 25.00 



Chapin, Mrs. Henrv B 

Chase, Arthur T. 

Chase, Mrs. Theodore - 

Children's Hospital Emplovees 

Childs, Mrs. Arthur E 

Clapp, Misses Elizabeth W. and 

Marv Constance 

Clark, "Mrs. Frank E. 

Clark, Dr. and Mrs. George O 

Clark, Mrs. Henry Cannon 

Clark, Miss Katherine F 

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Philip M 

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J 

Cochran, Mrs. Edwin P 

Conant, Mr. and Mrs. Augustine 

Condit, Miss Louise 

Converse, Mrs. Costello C 

Converse, Miss Eliza Nott 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon 

Coolidge, Mr. and Mrs. J. 

Tern pieman 

Coolidge, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 

Coulson, Mrs. John 

Countway, Francis A 

Craig, Mrs. Helen M 

Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. George H. 
Crowninshield, Mr. and Mrs. 

Francis B 

Cunningham, Mrs. Charles C 

Cunningham, Mr. and Mrs. 

Edward 

Cunningham, Mr. and Mrs. Guy 

Curran, Maurice J. (deceased) 

Curtis, Albert H _ 

Curtis, Mrs. Louis 

Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 

Curtis, Miss Mary 

Cutler, Mr. and Mrs. Roger W 

Dane, Dr. and Mrs. John 

Davenport, Mrs. George H 

Danielson, Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. 

Dearborn, Mrs. F. M., Jr 

Dennett, Mr. and Mrs. Carl P.. 
De Normandie, Mr. and Mrs. 

Philip Y 

Devens, Mr. and Mrs. Charles .. 

Dewson, Mrs. George B 

Dexter, Charles O _ 

Dexter, Mrs. Philip 

Dexter, Mr. and Mrs. William. 
Dexter, Mr. William Endicott... 

Dooley, William J 

Drury, Mrs. Samuel S 



10.00 
5.00 
25.00 
58.00 
10.00 

2.00 
10.00 
10.00 

100.00 

5.00 

25.00 

25.00 

200.00 
10.00 
25.00 

100.00 
10.00 
15.00 

100.00 

50.00 

5.00 

100.00 
50.00 
25.00 

100.00 
150.00 

15.00 

.. 5.00 

25.00 

10.00 

25.00 

25.00 

5.00 

250.00 

50.00 

25.00 

50.00 

400.00 

100.00 

50.00 
25.00 
10.00 
10.00 
50.00 
50.00 
25.00 
35.00 
25.00 



Eaton, Mrs. Frederick W 50.00 

Eliot, Dr. Christopher R 5.00 

Elliot, Mr. and Mrs. John M 50.00 

Emmons, Mr. and Mrs. Robeit W. 25.00 

Employers Group and Employees 10.00 

Evans, Mrs. David J 5.00 



[ 25 ] 



Fales, Mrs. Herbert E 

Falvey, Mrs. Donald 

"William Jav Fagan Dav — 

Nov. 4" 

Ferguson, Bennett S 

Field, Mr. & Mrs. Edward Olsen 

Finney, William A 

First Nat. Bank of Boston 

& Affiliated Cos. Employees 

Fish, Miss Margaret A 

Flagg, Dr. and Mrs. Elisha 

Folsom, Grenville W 

Forbes, Dr. and Mrs. Alexander- 
Foster, Mrs. A. D 

Foster, Miss Hilda S 

Friedman, Mrs. Max 

"A Friend" 

Frost, Mr. & Mrs. Donald McKay 

Frost, Mrs. Rufus H 

Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A 

GafHeld, Mrs. Erastus C 

Gale, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E 

Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. George P. 

Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. Philip 

Gerry, Mrs. E. Peabody 

Gilmore, Mrs. G. L 

Gleason, Mr. & Mrs. Clarence W. 

Goldthwait, Mrs. Joel E 

Goodwin, Mrs. Harry M 

Grant, Judge and Mrs. Robert 

Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Francis C 

Gray, Reginald 

Gray, Mrs. Reginald _ 

Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Roland 

Grew, Edward W 

Grew, Mrs. Edward W 

Grew, Mr. and Mrs. Henry S 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund 

Gross, Mr. and Mrs. Robert H 

Guild, Mrs. S. Eliot 

Hall, H. D wight 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John L 

Hallowell, Jones and Donald 

Halsey, Mrs. Martha Fuller 

Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 

Hammond, Mr. and Mrs. H. L 

Hammond, Mrs. Samuel 

Hanington, Miss Elizabeth F 

Harrington, Mrs. Charles 

Hasenfus, Nathaniel J 

Hatfield, Dr. and Mrs. Hugh K.... 

Hathaway, Mrs. Horatio 

Hayden, Miss V. Pauline „ 

Herman, Mrs. Joseph M 

Herter, Mr. and Mrs. Christian A. 

Hoag, Mrs. Charles R 

Holbrook, Mrs. Walter H 

Hollingsworth, Amor, Jr _ 

Hollis, Mr. James B 

Hood, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur N 

Hopkins, Miss Emma A 

Hornblower, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 

Houghton, Mrs. Clement S 

Houghton, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick O 



25.00 Flowe, Henry Saltonstall 5.00 

25.00 Howe, James C 50.00 

Howe, Miss Phyllis A 5.00 

200.00 Howes, Mrs. Osborne 20.00 

100.00 Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. 5.00 

10.00 Hunnewell, Mr. and Mrs. 

10.00 Arnold W 85.00 

Hunnewell, Mrs. H. S 50.00 

23.00 "Mr. H." 100.00 

5.00 Hunnewell, Mrs. James M 25.00 

20.00 Hunnewell, Miss Jane B 5.00 

10.00 

25.00 Jackson & Curtis Employees 12.50 

5 - 00 Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 15.00 

10.00 Jardine, Miss Tanette G 5.00 

10.00 Jones, Mr. and Mrs. William E 50.00 

5 - 00 Jordan, Mrs. Robert 150.00 

50.00 Jouett, Mr. and Mrs. Mark R 50.00 

3.00 

25 ' 00 Kellev, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund 

f^^ Kennellv, Mr. and Mrs. A 2.15 

^'on Kidder, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 2nd 50.00 

?J™ Kimball, Mrs. Benjamin P 10.00 

. "" King, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 25.00 

*'ZZ King, Mr. and Mrs. Gelston T 150.00 

^^ King, Mrs. Henry P. Sr 25.00 

i^^l Kinneyj Miss Mertie N 5.00 

,Q0 Klopot, Abraham 10.00 

10 * Kneppenberg, Henry C, Jr 7.14 

25.00 

25.oo Ladd, Dr. and Mrs. William E 50.00 

25 oo Lane, Mrs. Gardiner M 25.00 

25*00 Lane, Miss S. Belle 5.00 

25*00 Langill, Leslie 20.00 

25,00 Lawrence, Mrs. Amory A 25.00 

10.00 Lawrence, Miss Mary B 5.00 

100.00 Lee, Miss Elizabeth „ 10.00 

10 'oo Lee, Mr. and Mrs. John C 10.00 

10.00 Leland, Miss Elizabeth G. 

"In Memoriam" 5.00 

10.00 Lever Brothers Company 500.00 

100.00 Leveroni, Judge Frank 25.00 

50.00 Levi, Miss Elizabeth F 5.00 

20.00 Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. George, Jr. 15.00 

50*00 Little, Mrs. Leon M 10.00 

10.00 Long, Harry U 5.00 

5 00 Longwood Towers Employees 5.00 

5.00 Loomis, Mrs. Ralph 10.00 

5.00 Loring, Augustus P., Jr „ 10.00 

5.00 Loring, Mrs. Augustus P., Jr 15.00 

10.00 Loring, Mr. and Mrs. Caleb „ 10.00 

25.00 Loring, Miss Marjorie C 25.00 

100.00 Lovett, Mrs. R. W 25.00 

15.00 Lyman, George H 20.00 

50.00 Lyman, Mrs. George H 10.00 

25.00 Lyman, Theodore 100.00 

10.00 

25.00 Mahadv, E. F. Co. & Employees 10.00 

25.00 Maclean, Margaret F 4.00 

10.00 Mann, Charles F 5.00 

5.00 Manson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Edgar 5.00 

200.00 Maraspin, Francis L _ 10.00 

25.00 Mason, Mrs. Austin B 20.00 

Massachusetts S. P. C. A 10.00 

25.00 Matless, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 15.00 

[ 26 ] 



Mayosmith, Mr. and Mrs. 

Richmond 

Mead, Mrs. Frederick S 

Means, Mrs. James 

Meigs, Mrs. M. S 

Merrill, Miss Annie G 

Merrill, Mr. and Mrs. Luther M. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B 

Meyer, Mrs. Saltonstall 

Michael, Arthu r 

Mitchell, Miss Lilian 

Mitchell, Nathaniel M 

Moir, Mr. John 

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. 
Moors, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W.... 

Morse, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H 

Morton, Judge and Mrs. Marcus... 

Moseley, Mr. and Mrs. F. S 

Motley, Mr. E. Preble 

Motley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lothrop... 
Murphy, Miss Helena A 



Neely, James C 

N. E. Ins. Exchange Employees., 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Employees 

Newell, Dr. Franklin S 

Newman, Mrs. Samuel J 

Nunn, Mrs. Charles P 



5.00 

25.00 

20.00 

2.50 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

15.00 

25.00 

5.00 

25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

200.00 

25.00 

10.00 

20.00 

50.00 
5.71 
18.85 
25.00 
10.00 
5.00 



Olsen, Olaf _ 15.00 

Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. 100.00 

Palmer, Mr. & Mrs. Henry W, Jr. 10.00 

Parker, Augustin H „ 15.00 

Parker, Frederic 10.00 

Parker, Mrs. Frederic 20.00 

Parker, Mrs. J. Harlston 25.00 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. William 

Amory 100.00 

Parks, Mrs. William A 15.00 

Peavy, Mrs. Silas 5.00 

Peters, Mrs. Andrew J 25.00 

Peters, Mr. and Mrs. William Y. 20.00 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T 10.00 

Phelan, Mrs. James J 25.00 

Philbrick, Mrs. M. E 35.00 

Pickering, Miss Minnie M 5.00 

Pickman, Mrs. Dudley L 25.00 

Pickman, Mr. and Mrs. Dudlev 

L. Jr I. 10.00 

Pingree, Mrs. Arthur H 5.00 

Pingree, Mrs. Sumner 100.00 

Pitman, Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. 10.00 

Pokat, Mrs. Louis 5.00 

Pope, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph L 5.00 

Powers, Dr. and Mrs. George H. 25.00 

Rantoul, Mrs. Neal 100.00 

Ratshesky, Mrs. Theresa S 5.00 

Raymond, Mrs. F. F 5.00 

Raymond, Mrs. Franklin F 5.00 

Reed, Miss Emily S 10.00 

Reed, Miss Ida B 15.00 

Reid, J. C 5.00 

Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. 

Harrison G 25.00 



Rice, Harry L 

Rice, John C 

Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles F 

Richardson, Dr. Edward P 

Richardson, Mrs. John 

Richardson, W. K 

Riley, Miss Mabel Louise 

Rimmer, Mrs. Charles P 

Robinson, Edward P 

Robinson, Fred N 

Ross, Mrs. Waldo O 

Rotch, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. 

Rothwell, James M 

Rousmaniere, Miss Mary S 

Russell, Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. 

Sanderson, E. L 

Sargent, Dr. Ara N 

Sayles, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. 

Schraffa, Dr. Louis E 

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R 

Searle, Miss Martha E 

Sears, Herbert M 

Sears, Mr. and Mrs. Philip 

Sheafe, Mrs. William 

Shaw, Miss Rosemarv 

Shaw, Mr. and Mrs."S. P 

Shepard, Miss Emilv B 

Sias, Mrs. Charles D 

Slade, Miss Margaret B 

Slattery, E. T. Co 

Smith, Mrs. Charles L 

Smith, Miss Ida C 

Sortwell, Mrs. A. F 

Sohier, Mr. and Mrs. W. D., Jr. 

Soule, Mrs. Horace H 

Spaulding, Mr. and Mrs. John T. 

Spaulding, Mrs. William S 

Sprague, Seth 

Stackpole, Miss Alice 

Stackpole, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis 

Steinert, Mrs. Alexander 

Stockton. Mr. and Mrs. Phillip 

Stone, Mrs. Robert G 

Strauss, Mrs. Ferdinand 

Sturgis, Mrs. S. Warren 

Sullivan, Miss Jennie E 

Swift, Mr. and Mrs. George H. 



15.00 
25.00 

10.00 

25.00 

5.00 

25.00 

75.00 

50.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

270.00 

10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 
10.00 

5.00 
15.00 

3.00 
50.00 
25.00 
10.00 

5.00 
25.00 
10.00 
50.00 

5.00 

105.00 

10.00 

5.00 

10.00 

100.00 

5.00 
25.00 
50.00 
10.00 
10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

300.00 

20.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 

100.00 



Taft, Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. 100.00 

Talbot, Dr. and Mrs. Fritz B 50.00 

Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. William O. 50.00 

Thomas, Miss Helen 25.00 

Thorp, Miss Alice A 10.00 

Travelli, Charles Irwin Fund 100.00 

Train, Miss Elizabeth P 25.00 

Tripp, Mr. William V., Jr 10.00 

L T . S. Government Employees 5.00 

Vaughan, Miss Bertha H 25.00 

Vaughn, Walter J 5.00 

Wardwell, Mr. and Mrs. 

Sheldon E. ..?. „ 25.00 



[ 27 ] 



Warren, Mrs. Clifford P 5.00 

Warren, Mrs. Samuel D 100.00 

Welch, Mrs. Francis C 50.00 

Weld, Mrs. Charles G 25.00 

Weld, Mrs. George S 12.00 

Weld, Mrs. Rudolph 10.00 

Wheeler, Edward C, Jr 5.00 

Whitelock, Mrs. W. M. E 25.00 

Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. 

William, Jr 50.00 

Whitney, Rev. Arthur B. 5.00 

Williams, Mrs. Charles A 5.00 

Williams, Roger 25.00 



Willis, Miss Clara L 28.00 

Willis, Edith M „ 5.00 

Windeler, Mrs. G. H 25.00 

Winslow, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 10.00 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B „ 50.00 

Winthrop, Miss Katherine „ 75.00 

Wolcott, Mr. and Mrs. Roger 75.00 

Wolcott, Mr. and Mrs. Huntington 25.00 

Wood, Mrs. William M 75.00 

Wyzanski, M. E. and C. E. Trust 25.00 

Zepfler, Louis 5.00 

97 Anonymous Contributors 5,869.29 




There's something funny in my gum 
I feel it with my little thumb 
Tho' doc says no you mustn't do 
If you were I now wouldn't you? 



[ 28 ] 











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i- 



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; 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation: 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 







Fifty- Seventh Annual Report 

For the Year 1939 



3(n iHemoriam 



PHILIP STOCKTON 
February 11, 1940 



Director since 1915 
Treasurer since 1918 



A Leader, wise and generous, 

whose guidance will be 

keenly missed. 



FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

19 3 9 

INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 

Since 1881 the Infants' Hospital has provided medical 
treatment for infants without regard to race, creed, 
color or residence. 

Our Research Studies and the training and experience 
given to Doctors, Medical Students and Nurses may 
some day SAVE THE BABY IN YOUR OWN HOME. 

WHAT YOUR DOLLARS GIVE 

Light, heat, food, nurses and doctors for one baby 
for . . . 

One day costs $4.00 

Seven days cost $28.00 

Twenty days cost $80.00 

One month costs $120.00 

$200 runs the whole hospital full of sick babies 

for one day. 

$6000 endows a memorial bed in perpetuity. 




[ 2 ] 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL DIRECTOR 

THE year 1939 has been one of great activity and real progress. A total 
number of 746 patients were admitted to the Infants' Hospital. Of 
these 532 were discharged relieved, 41 were suffering from diseases which 
were unrelievable and 52 infants with surgical or orthopedic ills were trans- 
ferred to the Children's Hospital. It is gratifying to note that only six of 
the 746 babies were removed from the ward on the parents' own responsi- 
bility or against advice. This latter figure reflects great credit upon the 
care given by the medical and nursing staff and bespeaks better than any 
words the confidence parents have in the personnel at the Infants' Hospital. 
The hospital which, for financial reasons, was forced to reduce the daily 
quota to thirty-five beds, exclusive of the premature infants, has been run- 
ning to its full capacity. There was an average daily quota of thirty-five 
patients and the average length of stay per patient has been seventeen days. 
It is regrettable that it was imperative in 1933 to reduce the daily quota of 
fifty-five beds to thirty-five beds because of the decrease in investment earn- 
ings and of gifts from its friends, as the Infants' Hospital, in the position 
which it occupies, should be able to extend the best of present day medical 
service to the largest possible number of babies needing hospital care in this 
community. 

As to the number of babies who died, the statistical record reveals that 
the gross mortality was fifteen per cent. This continues to remain at the 
same low level of the past three years. Sixty-three patients or 53.8 per cent 
who died within less than forty-eight hours after admission to the ward suf- 
fered from neo-natal diseases — that is prematurity, congenital anomalies in- 
compatible with life, avoidable and unavoidable illness incident to birth and 
acute and rapidly fatal infections, — as pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis and 
the like. If these sixty-three babies are excluded from the total fifteen per 
cent, the net mortality would be around eight per cent, a remarkably low 
figure. Many of the neo-natal diseases are preventable and many of them 
can be benefitted by specific and effective remedies. The old adage "suc- 
cessful treatment is founded on early and correct diagnosis" suggests one of 
the several ways by which the mortality in the early days of life might be 
reduced. 

Let us now turn to a few interesting comments concerning the types of 
diseases admitted to the wards in former years. To mention some — active 
rickets, scurvy, all forms of tuberculosis, diphtheria, syphilis, summer 
diarrhea, and malnutrition which used to be common diseases, though they 
still exist, may now be spoken of as rarities in hospital practice. This chang- 
ing trend has resulted from the acquisition of knowledge pertaining to such 
infantile diseases, — knowledge which has come from the clinic, the funda- 
mental laboratories, and schools of public health — and its diffusion through 
propaganda to mothers and doctors. In all ways this trend bespeaks a real 
and very desirable advance. It is one purpose of the Infants' Hospital to 
study the serious conditions responsible for a high mortality in the commu- 
nity, and likewise to explore the field of pediatrics so that new methods of 
diagnosis and new forms of treatment may be applied to infants sick with 
diseases hitherto unpreventable and untreatable. 

Real progress in respect to some of the activities of the Infants' Hospi- 
tal may be reported at this time. Reference was made in 1931 to the devel- 
opment of a form of treatment for patients with a grave disease character- 
ized by jaundice and anemia, the underlying cause of which is a disturbance 

[ 3 ] 





^< 



'•-.. 



[ 4 ] 



of the blood-forming organs. Erythroblastosis Fetalis is the term applied 
to this symptom complex. In the past few years we have had ninety babies 
exhibiting the criteria essential for this diagnosis and when the disease is 
recognized at the time of birth or shortly thereafter, transfusions with blood 
usually carries them over the dangerous period to recovery. This year, of 
the thirteen patients admitted, ten recovered. 

As might be expected, each year since the chemical drug sulfanilamide 
was discovered, new chemical derivatives have been produced which like- 
wise kill the organisms causing pneumonia, meningitis, pyelitis and other 
diseases so invariably fatal or seriously handicapping to little children. Ac- 
cording to the new Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, each new drug 
must be tested as to its toxicity and its effectiveness before the manufactur- 
ers can distribute it to the medical profession. We have been approved by 
the federal authorities as one of the clinics where the new drugs sulfapyri- 
dine, sulfathiazol and sulfamethylthiazol might be studied in order to con- 
form to the terms of this law. This is an important step in the safeguarding 
of the public welfare, as in the past a number of deaths have taken place as 
the result of the use of untried remedies in the treatment of disease. 

This year, we have used with satisfactory results the newer forms of 
the chemical remedies which have been developed. In the majority of in- 
stances the effects are prompt and striking. For example, it is not unusual 
to see a little patient with pneumonia, in semi-coma, gasping for breath and 
with a temperature of 106° F. who, after treatment has been begun, is either 
quietly sleeping or sitting up in bed with a normal temperature within 
twenty-four to thirty-six hours. The same strikingly beneficial effect has 
been observed in streptococcus meningitis and in "pyelitis". There is much 
to be learned about the use of these drugs so that the many dangers attend- 
ing their use can be avoided. For instance, such highly potent drugs must 
not be used until the nature and type of the infecting organism has been de- 
termined in the bacteriological laboratory. The dose must be adjusted ac- 
cording to the weight of the patient and its effectiveness measured by tests 
of the blood in the chemical laboratory, in order to check for an under-dose 
or an over-dose. Then too, signs suggesting toxicity must be recognized so 
that the drug can be stopped or other measures instituted to counteract them. 

It would be remiss not to mention the air-conditioned premature 
nursery. The advantage of having available such modernized equipment 
continues to be as important a means of caring for premature babies as in 
the past. In this regard an interesting experience might be cited. A former 
house officer, knowing of the plans adopted here for the care of such babies, 
when blessed with a little daughter born one night several months before 
expentancy, asked for our help. Although he lived in Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, an experienced member of the staff drove to his home and brought the 
baby here in the premature ambulance. When she was admitted to the 
Hospital several hours later, she weighed just one pound and thirteen 
ounces. At the end of several weeks she was sent back to her home in New 
Hampshire weighing four and a half pounds. Now, nearly two years of 
age, she is a roly poly happy little girl. 

The means of avoiding cross infections on the wards is one of the 
problems which we have been investigating for the last few years. In the 
past it has been quite clearly demonstrated that cubicles and even masks 
have not been entirely successful in controlling cross infections which are so 
rampant in the winter months. Since it has been experimentally shown that 

[ 5 ] 



ultraviolet light exerts a killing power on air-borne bacteria, we have in- 
stalled, for actual practical trial, batteries of ultraviolet lights in the lower 
and upper wards of the Infants' Hospital. From this study, which will con- 
tinue through the summer of 1940, we hope to have some direct evidence as 
to the advantages of this form of protection. 

Through the support extended by a manufacturer of food products 
assisted by the generosity of a friend, we have continued our studies directed 
toward the use of an artificial food containing not only water, salts and 
sugar, but protein. As mentioned last year, this would constitute a most 
important step in the supportive treatment of infants suffering from vomit- 
ing and diarrhea. While it is too early to make any predictions as to our 
eventual success, we can at this time report progress. 

It is an accepted fact that many babies with infantile eczema are sensi- 
tive to cow's milk and other foods which contain animal protein. Therefore 
an important forward step in the treatment of these diseases has been taken 
by giving such babies the purified amino acids to supply them with the 
needed amount of protein so necessary for their proper growth and develop- 
ment. Already we have learned that in certain babies this modernized form 
of feeding has been of relief to the distressing symptoms associated with in- 
fantile eczema. 

Nearly everyone is convinced as to the practicability and usefulness of 
the fluoroscope which was installed a few years ago. It has done that which 
it was expected to do in "doing away with the necessity of carrying babies 
the long distance to the central x-ray laboratory." Although it does not re- 
place entirely the information gained from the regulation x-ray machine, it 
has proven to be of great assistance in the early diagnosis of many forms of 
disease. The fluoroscope has likewise proven to be of great value in studies 
which are being conducted as to the nature and cause of certain forms of 
chronic intestinal indigestion. By making it possible to visualize the activi- 
ties of the stomach and intestines, it has aided us to recognize one form of 
indigestion which is relievable by a specialized form of feeding, and to inves- 
tigate another form, the course of which we have not yet discovered any 
means of altering. 

Further refinements in the methods of determining many of the labora- 
tory procedures which play so important a part in the present day treatment 
of disease, and as well aid in the continual search for new information, have 
become operative. One of the most important mechanical aids is the 
microphotocolorimeter, by means of which needed information may be se- 
cured from a sample of blood easily obtained from a needle puncture of the 
finger or toe, entirely removing the features of pain and difficulty of technic 
which formerly was required. 

At this time it seems appropriate to call attention to the fact that the 
members of the resident staff in effect actually graduate students. Each 
one after graduation from medical school has spent a year or more in some 
broadening field of medicine before coming to the Infants' Hospital. Thus, 
in order to continue to attract men of the calibre whom we have trained in 
the past, it is most essential that the maintenance of high standards in their 
training be constantly kept before us. This is a responsibility which we 
must recognize. The program for the teaching of undergraduate students 
has continued as in the past. 

Appreciation of the interest and assistance so generously given by the 
Ladies' Aid Society and the Board of Directors is expressed and acknowl- 

[ 6 ] 



edgment is made to the Director of the Hospital, the members of the nursing 
and medical staff, and the social service worker for their stimulating interest 
and cooperation in bearing the responsibilities of the medical care of the 
patients, of research and of teaching. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D., 

Medical Director. 




MEDICAL STATISTICS 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital Dec. 31, 1938 34 

Number of patients admitted during the year 1939 746 

Number of patients discharged during the year 1939 748 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital Dec. 31, 1939 32 



780 780 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $24.50 to $35.00 1 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $24.50 71 

Number of patients — reduced rate per wk. — 50c to $24.50 615 

Number of patients — free 59 

Total number of Hospital days 12,939 

Average number of patients daily 35+ 

Average days' stay 1 7+ 

DISCHARGED 

Relieved 532 

Unrelieved 41 

Transferred to other Hospitals 52 

Discharged on parents' own responsibility or against advice 6 

Died 117(15%) 

Total 748 
39 died in a few hours 
13 died in less than 24 hours 
1 1 died in less than 48 hours 
53.8% died in less than 48 hours. 

G. von L. Meyer, 

Director. 

[ v ] 





>*" 





T 



REPORT OF THE NURSING SERVICE 

HE nursing staff for the twenty- four hour service at the Infants' Hos- 
pital consists of the following: 

Graduate Staff 7 

1 Supervisor 

2 Head Nurses 

2 Staff Nurses — Day 
2 Staff Nurses — Night 

Student Nurses 22-23 

Ward Helpers 5 

As a result of certain national studies which have been made, we are 
able to make some comparison of the amount of care available at the Infants' 
Hospital with .other institutions. On the basis of these studies the American 
Hospital Association and the National League of Nursing Education advo- 
cate that the number of bedside hours to be provided for infants with medi- 
cal conditions should be an average of six hours for each patient in each 
twenty-four hours. These organizations recently studied fourteen hospitals 
which were selected on the basis that good nursing care prevailed. The study 
was made on the basis of six sampling periods of one week each every other 
month over a year, so that seasonal changes would be included. Twelve 
were general hospitals and two were hospitals for children and infants. The 

[ 8 ] 



Children's and Infants' Hospitals were included. In the group of seven 
hospitals where medical infants were segregated, the median hospital pro- 
vided 5.5 hours of care during twenty-four hours, and the average for the 
group was 5.4 hours. The average in the Infants' Hospital was found to be 
5.5 hours. In evaluating these findings it should be remembered that all of 
these general hospitals were not teaching hospitals, nor does the other chil- 
dren's hospital have the teaching or research program that goes on at the 
Infants' Hospital. The evidence seems to show that we are not over-staffed, 
but on the basis of our special problems it would be more to the point if we 
were above the median. 

We are grateful for the additional ward helper who was added to the 
staff in October, but we must still keep in mind that there is need for a 
graduate nurse whose chief responsibility shall be the supervision of the 
Milk Laboratory and the feeding of patients. 

During the year there was an average of .7 student off daily for illness 
or leave of absence following illness. The graduate staff of seven had 33^ 
days of illness and 26 days of leave of absence following illness during 1939. 
With the installation of the illuminators designed to decrease the bacterial 
content of the air, we hope that the effect will be shown in a decrease in the 
illness record of the staff as well as a decrease in infections among the 
babies. 

The use of oxygen tents has been largely superseded by sulfapyridine 
therapy. While this change has lightened certain aspects of the nursing 
care it has not decreased, but rather increased, the necessity for close observa- 
tion on the part of the nurses. The drug is given to infants in food, conse- 
quently, the feeding of these infants is of primary importance. 

In past years we have had many comments from nurses to the effect 
that while they learned a good deal about sick children and sick infants, they 
were rather at a loss when it came to the activities of normal babies. We do 
not believe that this criticism is valid now, because many opportunities are 
utilized at the Infants' Hospital to teach the student nurse the care and 
training of normal infants. The playroom which is used by the babies dur- 
ing their convalescence is a useful adjunct to the ward in this training. 

Last year for a short time we tried the experiment of giving senior 
nurses experience in the Premature Nursery. We have continued this prac- 
tice during the past year whenever it has been possible to assign a student. 

The members of the Ladies' Aid Committee have evidenced their in- 
terest in the School of Nursing and graduate nursing staff by their participa- 
tion in the teas and also by their co-operation in the celebration of the 
School's Fiftieth Anniversary, and we are grateful to them. 

Stella Goostray, 
Superintendent of Nurses. 



[ 9 ] 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1940 

President 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH 

197 Commonwealth Avenue 

Secretary 
HENRY W. PALMER 

10 State Street 

Treasurer 

LINCOLN BAYLIES 

441 Stuart Street 



Directors 



Mrs. F. I. Amory 

Lincoln Baylies 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 

Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Hasket Derby 

Charles Devens 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder II 



Mrs. Gelston T. King 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George von L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. S. D. Warren 



Finance Committee 
Lincoln Baylies Charles M. Rotch 



Hospital Director 
George von L. Meyer 



Medical Director 
Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D. 



Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



CONSULTANTS 



Physicians 
William H. Howell, M.D. 
John Lovett Morse, M.D. 
Fritz B. Talbot, M.D. 



Otolaryngologist 
D. Crosby Greene, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Merrill C Sosman, M.D. 
Edward C. Vogt, M.D. 



[ io ] 



ACTIVE STAFF 

(For the academic year 1939 - 40 ^ 
Physicians 



Bronson Crothers, M.D. 
Louis K. Diamond, M.D. 
James L. Gamble, M.D. 
Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 



Charles F. McKhann, M.D. 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 
Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 
Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 



Associate Physicians 



Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
Randolph K. Byers, M.D. 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Surgeon 
William E. Ladd, M.D. 

Associates 
Robert E. Gross, M.D. 
Franc Ingraham, M.D. 
Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 

Pathologist 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 

Associate 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

Otolaryngologists 
Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 

Associate 

Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Assistant 
Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

Research Associate Laryngologist 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

Psychologist 
Elizabeth E. Lord, Ph.D. 

Supervisor of Nursing 
Miss Harriett Russell, R.N. 



Residents 



Harry Shwachman, M.D. 



R. Cannon Eley, M.D. 
Charles D. May, M.D. 
ClExMent A. Smith, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. 

Associate 
William T. Green, M.D. 

Bacteriologist 
Hans Zinsser, M.D. 

Associates 
LeRoy D. Fothergill, M.D. 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist 
J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 

Associates 
Paul Chandler, M.D. 
Edwin B. Goodall, M.D. 
Trygve Gundersen, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
George M. Wyatt, M.D. 

Associate 
Hugh F. Hare, M.D. 

Social Service 
Miss Mildred E. Hearsey 

Social Service Worker 
Mrs. Anna P. Smith 



Charles Henry Cutler, M.D. 



Glidden Lantry Brooks, M.D. 

House Officers — 1940 
Wilson Grubb Shugerman, M.D. John Holmes Dingle, M.D. 

Charles Macfie Campbell, M.D. Clifford Groselle Grulee, M.D. 

Rowland Lionel Mindlin, M.D. Winthrop Ingersoll Franke, M.D. 



[ ii ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 1940 



Chairman 
MRS. ALFRED KIDDER, II 

Vice-Chair men 
MRS. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, Jr. 



MRS. FREDERICK M. DEARBORN, Jt. 

Treasurer 
MRS. CHARLES E. CHANNING 

Assistant Treasurer 
MRS. FRANKLIN KING 

Secretary 
MRS. CHARLES F. HOVEY 

Assistant Secretary 
xMRS. WILLIAM T. KEMBLE 

Committee in Charge of Nurses' Teas 
MRS. CHARLES C. CUNNINGHAM 

Entertainment Committee 
MRS. F. WADSWORTH BUSK 

House Committee Visiting Committee 

MRS. EDMUND S. KELLEY, Jr. MRS. FORRESTER A. CLARK 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE FINANCIAL REPORT 

MRS. CHARLES E. CHANNING, Treasurer 
January 1, 1939, to January 1, 1940 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand January 1, 1939 $ 395.02 

Dues 855.00 

Donations 135.00 

Refund on postage stamps 3.00 

Total Receipts $1,388.02 



Check outstanding 3.60 



$1,391.62 
DISBURSEMENTS 

Postage and Printing $292. 1 3 

Materials and Supplies 364.09 

Social Service Worker 21.30 

Miss Woolley Emergency Fund 25.00 

Card Catalogue and Typing Cards 15.55 

Share of Open House 97.90 

Share of Teas 50.00 

Trucking Pianos, Paul Whiteman Concert 30.00 

Total Disbursements $ 895.97 

Balance January 1, 1940 $ 495.65 

[ 12 ] 




LADES' AID COMMITTEE — ANNUAL REPORT 



THE Ladies' Aid Committee has met as usual regularly throughout the 
past year. Members have shown much interest and have attended the 
meetings faithfully. 

During the month of April the Committee gave a concert at Symphony 
Hall for the benefit of the Infants' Hospital at which Paul Whiteman 
played. Unfortunately we lost money on the concert and so could not en- 
dow a bed this year. 

On June 8th, 9th, and 10th the Seventieth Anniversary of the Chil- 
dren's Hospital and the Fiftieth Anniversary of the School of Nursing were 
celebrated. All those who have been connected with the Children's and 
Infants' Hospital were invited. 

The Alfred DufT Cooper lecture at Symphony Hall in November was 
not the financial success we had hoped for but his talk on Great Britain's 
situation in the war of today was extremely interesting. 

The Gardner House teas for the nurses have been continued, but dur- 
ing the year there were only two instead of the usual monthly ones. The tea 
dance on June 8th during the reunion was very large and a great success. 

The Christmas tea on December 18th included the doctors and much 
fun was had by all. 

We have had some resignations but are fortunate in having ten new 
active members. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Madeleine P. Kemble, 

Acting as Secretary. 



[ 13 ] 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



PHILIP STOCKTON, TREASURER 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1939 



ASSETS ' 

Cash $ 2,702.75 

General Funds Investments 451,479.20 

Permanent Funds, Investments 265,578.82 

Beverly Farms Real Estate 2,184.00 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr. Memorial Hospital and 

Equipment 145,451.40 

Total Assets $867,396.17 

FUNDS 

General Funds $448,950.14 

Permanent Funds 278,728.20 

Total 727, 6 78 . 3 4 

Less Deficit in Income and Expense Acct 5,733.57 721,944.77 

Hospital and Equipment Fund 145,451.40 

Total Fu nds $867,396.17 

TOTAL CASH RECEIPTS AND CASH PAYMENTS 
FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1939 

Receipts: 

Cash balance from last year $ 435.25 

Account of Income and Expense $ 76,479.92 

Investments sold and matured 61,281.95 

Bequest of Marion W. Speare 6,500.00 



Total Receipts 144,261.87 



Total Cash $144,697.12 

Payment: 

On account of Income and Expense $ 82,213.49 

Investments purchased 57,449.98 

On account of Beverly Real Estate 2,184.00 

On account of Ladies' Aid Committee.... 146.90 



Total Payments „ 141,994.37 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1939 .„ $ 2,702.75 

[ 16 ] 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 
FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1939 



RECEIPTS 

Community Federation of Boston $ 21,088.00 

Other Donations 1,260.00 

Committee of the Permanent Charity Fund, Inc 2,000.00 

A. C. Ratshesky Foundation^...,..,...., , , , , 200.00 

E. F. Fay Estate Income 200.00 

Income from Investments 33,845.26 

Total Receipts $ 58,593.26 



PAYMENTS 

Children's Hospital $ 77,030.01 

Less Credits 17,886.66 

59,143.35 

Salaries - 2,300.04 

Pension 366.00 

Boston Transcript 576.00 

Auditing Hospital and Treasurer's Account 250.00 

1,000 Annual Reports 187.39 

Printing and Postage 55.55 

Vault Rent plus tax 55.00 

Painting Building 890.00 

Other Publicity Expenses 503.50 

Total Payments $ 64,326.83 

Excess of Payments over Receipts for year ending 

December 31, 1939 $ 5,733.57 



REPORT OF AUDITOR 

I have examined the Treasurer's accounts of the Infants' Hospital for the year 
ending December 31, 1939 and certify the cash on hand December 31, 1939 has been 
verified with The First National Bank of Boston; that an examination of the securi- 
ties kept in The First National Bank vaults has been made and found correct. The 
income called for by the investments has been received, and payments are supported 
by checks returned through the bank endorsed by the payee or by other vouchers. 

Richard Pope, 

Auditor. 

[ 17 ] 



SCHEDULE 1 "A" 

List of Investment Belonging to General Funds 
December 31, 1939 

BONDS Due Rate 

Arkansas Power & Light Co 1956 5 

Boston & Maine R.R 1967 5 

Boston & Maine R.R - 1942 5 

Chicago Junction Railways 1940 5 

Columbia Gas & Electric Co 1961 5 

Consolidation Coal Company 1960 5 

Gatineau Power Company 1969 3^4 

Government of Dominion of Canada 1952 5 

Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range R.R 1962 3 x /4 

International Paper Company 195 5 6 

Jersev Central Power k Light Co 1961 4 l / 2 

Maine Central R.R 1945 4 

New York Central R.R 1946 33/ 4 

North Boston Lighting Cos 1947 3 x / 2 

Potomac Edison Company 1961 4- l /2 

Safe Harbor Water Power Co 1979 \y 2 

Saguenay Power Co. Ltd 1966 4^4 

Shawinigan Water & Power Co 1967 4^4 

Southern Railway Co. General Mtg 1956 6 

United Stock Yards Corp 1951 ±Vx 

Western Maryland R.R 1977 S l / 2 

Western Massachusetts Companies 1946 3*4 

Total 

STOCKS 

American & Foreign Power Co. Pfd 100 shares $ 5,000.00 

American Sugar Refining Co. Pfd 100 shares 12,625.25 

American Superpower Co. Pfd 200 shares 19,865.00 

American Tel. & Tel. Co 117 shares 21,847.30 

Arkansas Power & Light Pfd 100 shares 5,000.00 

Central Maine Power Co. Pfd 200 shares 21,000.00 

Consolidation Coal Co. Pfd 30 shares 0. 

Consolidation Coal Co. Com 120 shares 0. 

Draper Corporation Com 875 shares 47,673.75 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Assoc. 6% Pfd 200 shares 18,600.00 

Electric Bond & Share Sec. Co. Com 88 shares 2,000.00 

Electric Bond & Share Co. $5 Pfd 100 shares 9,223.61 

Electric Bond & Share Co. $6 Pfd 100 shares 10,750.00 

General Electric Co. Com 800 shares 29,600.00 

General Motors Corp. 5% Pfd 100 shares 12,025.26 

Illinois Central R.R. Pfd 100 shares 11,215.00 

International Match Realization Co 20 shares 176.71 

Nashua Mfg. Co. 1st Pfd 100 shares 6,000.00 

Nashua Mfg. Co. 2nd Pfd 100 shares 4,100.00 

Saco-Lowell Shops Class A Pfd 150 shares 4,000.00 

Saco-Lowell Shops Common 150 shares 1,000.00 

Southern Pacific R.R. Common .". 100 shares 5,000.00 

Union Pacific R.R. Pfd 100 shares 8,002.50 

United Drug, Inc _ 40 shares 480.00 

United Fruit Co 100 shares 8,020.20 

United States Steel Co 100 shares 10,000.00 



Par 


Book 


Value 


Value 


(J10,000 


$ 9,575.00 


10,000 


9,325.00 


6,000 


6,180.00 


6,000 


5,940.00 


5,000 


5,219.62 


4,000 


1,000.00 


5,000 


4,912.50 


10,000 


9,950.00 


10,000 


9,800.00 


10,000 


9,962.50 


10,000 


10,075.00 


5,000 


5,000.00 


10,000 


9,800.00 


10,000 


10,000.00 


10,000 


9,950.00 


10,000 


9,691.25 


10,000 


10,000.00 


20,000 


12,393.75 


10,000 


9,650.00 


10,000 


9,800.00 


5,000 


4,987.50 


5,000 


5,062.50 




$178,274.62 



Total $273 ,204. 5 8 

TOTAL GENERAL FUND INVESTMENTS $451,479.20 

[ 18 ] 



SCHEDULE 1 "B" 

List of Investments Belonging to Permanent Funds 

December 31, 1939 

Par Book 

BONDS Due Rate Value Value 

Alabama Power Company 1967 V/ 2 $10,000 $10,337.50 

Bethlehem Steel Co 1966 3^4 10,000 10,013.94 

Carolina Power & Light Co 1956 5 10,000 10,400.00 

Central Pacific R.R 1949 4 5,000 5,012.50 

Central R.R. of Georgia 1959 5 10,000 5,000.00 

Columbia Gas & Electric Co 1952 5 5,000 5,225.87 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Associates 1956 4 10,000 9,650.00 

Florida Power & Light Co 1954 5 10,000 9,525.00 

Great Northern R.R. Co 1973 5 10,000 9,250.00 

Illinois Power and Light Co 1953 6 9,000 8,865.00 

Lexington & Eastern R.R 1965 5 3,000 2,977.50 

Montana Power Company 1966 3^4 10,000 9,491.35 

New York Central & Hudson R.R 1997 3^ 5,000 4,400.00 

New York Central & Hudson R.R 1998 3 l / 2 5,000 4,800.00 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R 1947 4 6,000 6,480.00 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R 1948 6 2,500 2,462.74 

New England Power Association 1954 S l / 2 20,000 19,000.00 

Northern States Power Co 1967 3^ 10,000 9,537.50 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co 1964 4 5,000 5,100.00 

United Drug Company 1953 5 20,000 18,910.83 

Wabash R.R 1975 S l / 2 12,000 6,000.00 

Lawyers Mortgage Investment Trust 1938 5 10,000 4,000.00 

Total $176,439.73 



STOCKS 

Aluminum Co. of America 6% Pfd 100 shares $10,712.50 

Boston & Albany R.R. Co 15 shares 3,070.00 

Duquesne Lighting Co. 5% First Pfd 100 shares 9,750.00 

Boston Edison Co „ 100 shares 15,981.95 

Electric Bond & Share Co. Pfd. 6% 100 shares 10,325.00 

New England Tel & Tel. Co 25 shares 2,398.34 

Pennsylvania R.R „ 200 shares 10,000.00 

Puget Sound Power & Light Co. Prior Pr. Pfd. 85 shares 7,613.17 

Puget Sound Traction Lt. & Pr. Co. Pfd 25 shares 2,581.25 

Quincy Market Cold Storage Co. Pfd 16 shares 1,600.00 

Standard Oil Co. of Ohio 5% Pfd 100 shares 10,300.00 

Union Pacific R.R. Co. Com 25 shares 3,000.00 

United Corporation, Pfd 35 shares 1,806.88 



Total „„ „ $ 89,139.09 

TOTAL PERMANENT FUND INVESTMENTS $265,578.82 



[ 19 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 
Mrs. Timothee Adamowski 
Mrs. Charles F. Adams, Jr. 
Mrs. R. L. Agassiz 
Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 
Miss Olivia Ames 
Mrs. Francis I. Amory 
Mrs. Harcourt Amory, Jr. 
Mrs. J. Austin Amory 
Mrs. Talbot Baker 
Mrs. James O. Bangs 
Miss Julia A. Barbour 
Mrs. B. Devereux Barker 
Mrs. J. C. Bassett 
Mrs. Walter C. Baylies 
Mrs. T. P. Beal, Jr. 
Mrs. Wm. DeFord Beal 
Mrs. Arthur M. Beale 
Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 
Mrs. K. D. Blackfan 
Mrs. George B. Blake, Jr. 
Mrs. Thomas S. Blumer 
Mrs. John F. Bradley 
Miss Barbara Bremer 
Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 
Miss Elsie C. Brewer 
Miss Susan H. Brewer 
Mrs. Gorham Brooks 
Mrs. Davenport Brown 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 
Mrs. Edmund J. Burke 
Mrs. F. M. Burnham 
Miss Nina Burnham 
Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 
Mrs. Samuel Cabot 
Mrs. William Caswell 
Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 
Mrs. Charles E. Channing 
Mrs. Theodore Chase 
Mrs. F. C. Church, Jr. 
Mrs. Forrester A. Clark 
Mrs. Henry C. Clark 
Mrs. Nathaniel T. Clark 
Mrs. R. F. Clark 
Mrs. R. J. Clark 
Mrs. Charles P. Clifford 
Mrs. Sargent F. Collier 
Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 



Mrs. T. J. Coolidge, Jr. 

Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield 

Mrs. Charles C. Cunningham 

Mrs. Edward Cunningham 

Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 

Mrs. Edward Dane 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson 

Mrs. Frederick M. Dearborn, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Devens 

Mrs. William Dexter 

Mrs. J. Lindsay Dexter 

Mrs. Frederick W. Eaton 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

Mrs. John M. Elliott 

Miss Josephine Emery 

Mrs. Clark Emmet 

Mrs. Robert W. Emmons, Jr. 

Mrs. S. Palfrey Fabyan 

Mrs. Robert Faxon 

Mrs. William S. Febiger 

Mrs. Lawrence Foster 

Mrs. Donald McKay Frost 

Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 

Mrs. Theodore Frothingham, Jr. 

Mrs. George P. Gardner, Jr. 

Mrs. Harrison Gardner 

Mrs. John W. Goodrick 

Mrs. Wallace Goodrich 

Mrs. Francis C. Gray 

Mrs. Henry V. Greenough 

Mrs. James C. Greenway, Jr. 

Mrs. H. S. Grew 

Mrs. Henry R. Guild 

Mrs. John L. Hall 

Mrs. John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Paul Hamlen 

Mrs. Huntingt6n R. Hardwick 

Mrs. Richard Harte 

Mrs. John Heard, Sr. 

Mrs. Robert F. Herrick, Jr. 

Mrs. Christian A. Herter 

Mrs. Francis S. Hill 

Mrs. John Hoar 

Mrs. C. E. Hodges, Jr. 

Mrs. Amor Hollingsworth, Jr. 

Mrs. Valentine Hollingsworth 



[ 20 ] 



Mrs. John Homans 

Miss Anne Houghton 

Mrs. Charles Hovey 

Mrs. Chandler Hovey, Jr. 

Miss Phyllis Howe 

Mrs. Osborne Howes 

Mrs. James M. Hunnewell 

Mrs. G. N. Hurd 

Mrs. Mark Jouett 

Mrs. Edmund S. Kelley, Jr. 

Mrs. William Kemble 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder II 

Mrs. Franklin King 

Mrs. Gelston T. King 

Mrs. Alexander H. Ladd, Jr. 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. G. M. Lane 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence 

Miss Luisita A. Leland 

Mrs. David M. Little 

Mrs. Dunbar Lockwood 

Mrs. Charles E. Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry L. Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 

Mrs. James Means 

Mrs. Houghton Metcalf 

Mrs. Charles G. Mixter, Jr. 

Mrs. J. Lothrop Motley 

Mrs. Richard Olney 

Mrs. Hamilton Osgood, 2nd 

Mrs. Franklin H. Palmer 

Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 

Mrs. Augustine H. Parker, Jr. 

Mrs. Francis S. Parker 

Mrs. Frederick Parker 

Mrs. W. A. Parker 

Mrs. Marc Peter, Jr. 

Mrs. Andrew J. Peters 

Mrs. Carleton Pike 

Mrs. Brooks Potter 

Mrs. George Putnam 

Mrs. Winthrop Pyemont 

Mrs. H. G. Reynolds 

Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 

Mrs. J. Hampden Robb 



Mrs. Frederick B. Robinson 
Mrs. Sherwood Rollins 
Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 
Mrs. William A. Russell 
Mrs. Henry B. Sawyer 
Mrs. H. E. Sawyer 
Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 
Mrs. Philip S. Sears 
Mrs. Richard D. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Louis A. Shaw 
Mrs. S. Parkman Shaw 
Mrs. F. Foster Sherburne 
Mrs. Stephen W. Sleeper 
Mrs. C. Wharton Smith 
Mrs. Richard M. Smith 
Mrs. William S. Spaulding 
Miss Faith Stanwood 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. Charles M. Storey 
Mrs. Richard C. Storey 
Mrs. Richard C. Storey, Jr. 
Mrs. George H. Swtft 
Miss Lucille Swift 
Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 
Mrs. Thomas C. Thacher, Jr. 
Mrs. Warren Thayer 
Mrs. Bayard Tuckerman, Jr. 
Mrs. John A. Tuckerman 
Mrs. Bayard Warren 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Mrs. Donald C. Watson 
Mrs. Francis C. Welch 
Mrs. George S. Weld 
Miss Priscilla A. Weld 
Miss Dorothy West 
Mrs. E. A. Whitney 
Mrs. Norton Wigglesworth 
Mrs. G. Herbert Windeler 
Miss Katherine Winthrop 
Mrs. Nathaniel T. Winthrop 
Mrs. Roger Wolcott 
Mrs. S. H. Wolcott 
Mrs. S. H. Wolcott, Jr. 
Mrs. William S. Youngman 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Mrs. Charles F. Richardson Miss Ida C. Smith 

Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley Mrs. George E. Warren 

Mrs. Charles Harrington 



[ 21 ] 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



Agassiz, Mrs. Rodolphe L. 
Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Amory, Mrs. F. I. 
Anderson, Mrs. Larz 

Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 
Bartlett, Mrs. Nelson S., Jr. 
Baylies, Lincoln 
Beale, Arthur M. 
Bell, Mrs. Stoughton 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward L. 
Blackfan, Dr. K. D. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A. 
Bradley, Mr., J. Gardner 
Bremer, Mrs. Theodore G. 
Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Cave, Mrs. Edwin F. 
Chapin, Mrs. John R. 
Cheever, Mrs. David 
Clark, Mrs. R. F. 
Clark, Mrs. R. J. 
Converse, Miss E. N. 
Crowninshield, Mrs. F. B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Allen 
Curtis, Mrs. E. R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 

Dane, Mrs. Ernest B., Jr. 
De Forde, Miss Alice 
Derby, Hasket 
Devens, Charles 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 
Ely, Mrs. P. V. R. 

Forbes, Mrs. Allan 
Forbes, F. Murray 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 

Gaston, Mrs. William A. 

Hall, Mrs. John L. 
Hall, John M. 
Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Hamlen, Mrs. P. M. 
Harrington, Mrs. Charles 
Heard, Mrs. John 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. 
Homans, Mrs. John 
Howes, Mrs. Osborne 
Hunnewell, F. W. 
Hunnewell, Mrs. H. S. 

Iasigi, Mrs. Mary V. 
Ide, Miss E. K. 



Jackson, Mrs. James 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Jr. 

Kaufmann, Mrs. Karl F. 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, II 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M. 
King, Mrs. Gelston T. 

Ladd, Mrs. William E. 
Lawrence, Rev. William 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Liggett, Louis K. 
Lovett, Mrs. R. W. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B. 
Meyer, Geo. von L. 
Meyer, Mrs. F. S. 
Morse, Dr. John Lovett 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble 

Nickerson, Mrs. Roland W. 

O'Connell, P. A. 

Palmer, Mrs. Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W., Jr. 
Palmer, Mrs. Henry W., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. F. S. 

Rheault, Mrs. Charles A. 
Richardson, Mrs. Homer B. 
Rotch, Arthur G. 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Rotch, Charles M. 

Sargent, Mrs. S. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Henry R. 
Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. 
Sears, Mrs. Philip S. 
Seymour, Robert W. 
Shaw, S. Parkman, Jr. 
Sheafe, Mrs. William 
Simmons, Mrs. G. W. 
Stillman, Mrs. Carl S. 
Stockton, Mrs. Philip 

Talbot, Mrs. Fritz B. 
Tarbell, Mrs. John F. 
Thacher, Mrs. T. C. 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus 
Tower, Miss E. M. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry 

Warren, Mrs. Fiske 
Warren, Mrs. S. D. 
Webster, Edwin S. 
Windeler, Mrs. G. H. 



[ 22 ] 



1939 CONTRIBUTORS 



Anonymous Contributors (124) $6,650.56 

Abbott, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon, Jr. 100.00 

Adams, Miss Ethelind 25.00 

Adem, Inc 25.00 

Agassiz, Mrs. R. L 50.00 

Agoos, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon 100.00 

Alcaide, Mr. and Mrs. A. S 10.00 

Aldrich, William T „ 100.00 

Aldrich, Mrs. William T 50.00 

Allan, Mrs. Bryce J 100.00 

Ames, John S 100.00 

Ames, Mr. and Mrs. John S., Jr.... 300.00 

Ames, Miss Olivia 25.00 

Ames, Mrs. Oliver 25.00 

Amory, Mr. and Mrs. Francis I.... 50.00 

Atkins, Mrs. Edwin F 10.00 

Atkinson, Edward W 5.00 

Ayer, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F 150.00 

Bacon, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 

Edward 25.00 

Baer, Mrs. Louis 10.00 

Baker, Miss Hattie M 2.00 

Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Roland M.... 5.00 

Baldwin, Mrs. Edith Atkins 5.00 

Baldwin, Mrs. George S 5.00 

Barlow, Miss Mary L 25.00 

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. Joel M 5.00 

Barnet, Solomon J 5.00 

Bartlett, Mr. and Mrs. Nelson S. 50.00 

Bartol, Dr. and Mrs. John W 10.00 

Baxter, Mrs. Gregory Paul 10.00 

Baylies, Lincoln 10.00 

Beal, Miss Edith L 5.00 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. ... 250.00 

Beal, Mrs. William DeFord 50.00 

Beebe, Mr. C. Philip 50.00 

Bemis, Albert Farwell Charity 

Trust '... 1 5.00 

Bigelow, Mrs. Henry Forbes 100.00 

Blackfan, Dr. and Mrs. K. D 15.00 

Blumer, Mrs. Thomas S 25.00 

Boston Mfg. Mutual Fire Ins. 

Employees 15.00 

Bowden, Mrs. Herbert L 15.00 

Bradley, Mrs. Ralph 10.00 

Brewer, Miss Susan H 10.00 

Buff, Miss Alice E 10.00 

Burgess, John K 15.00 

Burke, Mrs. Edmund J 5.00 

Busk, Mr. and Mrs. F. Wadsworth 15.00 

Cabot, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 10.00 

Campbell, Mrs. Wallace M 10.00 

Campbell, Walter M 5.00 

Carter, John & Co., Inc 5.00 

Cave, Dr. and Mrs. Edwin P 25.00 

Chamberlain, Mrs. George N 25.00 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B 10.00 

Chase, Arthur T. .J. 5.00 

Chase, Mrs. Theodore 20.00 



Children's Hospital Employees 55.50 

Church, Mr. and Mrs. F. C, Jr. 50.00 
City and County Employees 

Group 15.00 

Clark, Mrs. Frank E 2.00 

Clark, Mrs. Frank M 10.00 

Clark, Dr. and Mrs. George O. ... 10.00 
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. 

Nathaniel T 50.00 

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J 25.00 

Clark, Miss Katherine F 5.00 

Clapp, Misses Elizabeth W. 

and Mary C 2.00 

Clarke, Philip M 25.00 

Cochran, Est. of Alice F 200.00 

Condit, Sears B 50.00 

Converse, Mrs. Costello C 100.00 

Converse, Mrs. Eliza Nott 10.00 

Coolidge, Mrs. Algernon 15.00 

Coolidge, Mr. and Mrs. J. 

Templeman 50.00 

Coulson, Mrs. John 5.00 

Countway, Francis A 100.00 

Cox, Erskine H 2.50 

Craig, Mrs. Helen M 50.00 

Crocker, Mrs. George H 25.00 

Crowninshield, Mr. and Mrs. 

Francis B 100.00 

Cruft, Miss Eunice M 25.00 

Cunningham, Mr. and Mrs. Guy 5.00 

Curtis, Albert H 10.00 

Curtis, Mrs. Louis 25.00 

Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 25.00 

Cutler, Mr. and Mrs. Roger W 100.00 

Dalton, Henry R 50.00 

Dane, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 50.00 

Dane, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest B 1,100.00 

Dane, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest B., Jr. 50.00 

Dane, Mrs. John 50.00 

Davenport, Mrs. George H 25.00 

Day, R. L., Co 5.00 

Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

Dennett, Mr. and Mrs. Carl P 250.00 

Devens, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 30.00 

Dewson, Mrs. George B 20.00 

Dexter, Mrs. Philip 50.00 

Dexter, Mr. and Mrs. William 25.00 

Dexter, Mr. and Mrs. William 

Endicott 25.00 

Dooley, William J 35.00 

Drury, Mrs. Samuel S 25.00 

Eis^man, Julius 50.00 

Elliot, Mr. and Mrs. John M 50.00 

Emery, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick I. 10.00 

Emmons, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. 25.00 
Endicott, Mr. and Mrs. H. 

Wendell 200.00 

Endicott, Miss Katharine 100.00 

Evans, Mrs. David J 5.00 



[ 23 ] 




[ 24 ] 



Falvey, Mrs. Donald 25.00 

Farrar, Frederick A 15.00 

Febiger, William S. Co 100.00 

Federal Employees Group 5.00 

"William Jay Fegan Day" 200.00 

Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. 

Bennett S 75.00 

Fessenden, Mr. and Mrs. 

Sewall H 200.00 

Finney, William A 10.00 

First Nat. Bank of Boston and 

Affiliated Companies Employees 5.00 

Fish, Miss Margaret A 5.00 

Flagg, Dr. and Mrs. Elisha 20.00 

Folsom, Grenville W 10.00 

Forbes, Dr. and Mrs. Alexander... 25.00 

Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. 5.00 

Foster, Mrs. Alfred D 5.00 

Foster, Miss Hilda S 10.00 

Friedman, Mrs. Max 10.00 

Frost, Mr. and Mrs. Donald 

McKay 50.00 

Frost, Mrs. Rufus H 2.00 

Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 5.00 

Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A 25.00 

Gaffield, Mrs. Erastus C 50.00 

Gardner, Mrs. George P 250.00 

Goodrich, Mrs. Wallace 25.00 

Goodwin, Mrs. Harry M 10.00 

Grant, Judge Robert 10.00 

Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Francis C 25.00 

Gray, Reginald 25.00 

Gray, Mrs. Reginald 25.00 

Grew, Mr. and Mrs. Henrv S 25.00 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund 100.00 

Grozier, Mrs. Edwin & Mr. R 47.62 

Guild, Mrs. S. Eliot 10.00 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John L 100.00 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John M 25.00 

Hallowell, Jones & Donald 50.00 

Halsey, Mrs. Martha Fuller 20.00 

Hammond, Mr. and Mrs. H. L 20.00 

Hammond, Mrs. Samuel 5.00 

Hanington, Miss Elizabeth F 5.00 

Hasenfus, Nathaniel J 5.00 

Hatfield, Dr. and Mrs. Hugh K.... 10.00 

Hathaway, Mrs. Horatio 10.00 

Heard, Mrs. John 7.50 

Hedge, Henry R , 2.00 

Herman, Mrs. Joseph M 15.00 

"A Friend" _ 5.00 

Herter, Mr. and Mrs. Christian A. 50.00 
"In Memory of Marion Gay 

Chamberlain" 25.00 

Hollingsworth, Mrs. A., Jr 15.00 

Holmes, Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. 5.00 

Hood, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur N 100.00 

Hopkins, Miss Emma A 5.00 

Houghton,. Mrs. Clement S 25.00 

Howe, Henry Saltonstall 10.00 

Howe, James C 50.00 

Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. 10.00 

Hunnewell, Mrs. Henry S 50.00 



Hunnewell, Mr. James M 100.00 

Hussey, Miss Elsie H 5.00 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 15.00 

Jenkins Brothers 2.00 

Jones, Mr. and Mrs. William E.... 50.00 

Jordan, Mrs. Robert 150.00 

Keefe, Thaddeus J 6.00 

Kellev, Mr. and Mrs. 

Edmund S., Jr 25.00 

Keyes, Mrs. Charles W 10.00 

Kil'duff, Miss Agnes G 1.00 

Kimball, Mrs. Benjamin P 20.00 

Kimball, Mrs. Thatcher R 10.00 

King, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 25.00 

King, Mrs. Gelston T 150.00 

King, Henry P 25.00 

Kinney, Miss Mertie N 5.00 

Klopot, A 15.00 

Kneppenberg, Henrv C, Jr 7.14 

Ladd, Dr. and Mrs." William E. ... 75.00 

Lamb, Mrs. Horatio A 25.00 

Lane, Mrs. Gardiner M 25.00 

Lane, Miss S. Belle 5.00 

Langill, Leslie 20.00 

Lavelle, Marie A 5.00 

Lawrence, Mrs. Amory A 25.00 

Lawrence, James & Co 35.00 

Lawrence, Miss Marv B 5.00 

Lee, Mr. and Mrs. John C 10.00 

Leland, Miss Elizabeth C 5.00 

Lever Brothers Co 500.00 

Leveroni, Judge Frank 25.00 

Levi, Miss Elizabeth F 5.00 

Libert}' Mutual Insurance Co. 

Emplo vees 3.80 

Little, Mrs. Leon M 10.00 

Loring, Mrs. Augustus P., Jr 25.00 

Loring, Miss Marjorie C 25.00 

Lowell, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 10.00 

Lundell Charitable Trust 10.00 

Lyman, Mrs. George H 10.00 

Lyman, Professor Theodore 75.00 

Mahady, E. F. Co 10.00 

Manson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Edgar 5.00 

Marshall, Mrs. Lawrence K 10.00 

Mason, Mrs. Austin B 20.00 

Meadows, Walter J 10.00 

Means, Mrs. James 20.00 

Meigs, Mrs. M. S 2.50 

Merrill, Mr. and Mrs. Luther M. 10.00 

Mever, Mrs. Saltonstall 10.00 

Michael, Arthur 10.00 

Mitchell, Miss Lilian 10.00 

Monks, Mrs. George H 25.00 

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. 5.00 

Moors, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. 25.00 

Morse, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H 25.00 

Morton, Judge & Mrs. Marcus 5.00 

Moselev, Mrs. F. S 200.00 

Motley, E. Preble „ 25.00 

Motley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lothrop 15.00 



[ 25 ] 



Murfitt, Mrs. Samuel C 5.00 

Murphy, Miss Helena A 20.00 

Neelv, James C 50.00 

N. E. Tel & Tel. Employees 14.00 

Newell, Dr. Franklin S 25.00 

Newman, Mrs. Samuel J 10.00 

Noone, Miss Helen L 1.00 

Olsen, Olaf 15.00 

Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. 100.00 
Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry W., 

J r , 20.00 

Parker, Augustin H 15.00 

Parker, Mrs. Augustin H., Jr 40.00 

Parker, Frederic 10.00 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. William 

Amory 100.00 

Parks, Mrs. William A 15.00 

Peabody, Rev. & Mrs. Endicott 25.00 

Peavy, Mrs. Leopold 5.00 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T 10.00 

Phelan, Mrs. James J 25.00 

Philbrick, Mrs. M. E 35.00 

Pickering, Miss Minnie M 5.00 

Pickman, Mr. and Mrs. Dudley 

L., Jr 10.00 

Pitman, Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. 10.00 

"In Memory of Louis Pokat" 10.00 

Ratsheskv, Mrs. Theresa S 5.00 

Reed, Miss Emily S 15.00 

Reed, Miss Ida B 15.00 

Reid, James C 5.00 

Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. 

Harrison G 25.00 

Rice, Harry L 15.00 

Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles F 10.00 

Richardson, Dr. Edward P 25.00 

Richardson, Mrs. John 5.00 

Richardson, William K 25.00 

Riley, Miss Mabel Louise 75.00 

Rimmer, Mrs. Charles P 50.00 

Riordan, Mrs. Charles F 25.00 

Robinson, Edward P 5.00 

Robinson, Fred N 10.00 

Rotch, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G 260.00 

Rothwell, Mr. and Mrs. James M. 10.00 

Sargent, Dr. Ara N 5.00 

Sayles, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. 10.00 

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R 15.00 

Searle, Miss Martha E 3.00 

Sears, Mrs. Helen N 10.00 

Sears, Herbert M 50.00 

Sears, Mr. and Mrs. Philip 25.00. 

Shaw, Miss Miriam 25.00 

Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. S. Parkman 25.00 



Shaw, Mrs. Thomas Mott 5.00 

Shepard, Miss Emily B 10.00 

Sherburne, Mrs. Maud T 10.00 

Sias, Mrs. Charles D 50.00 

Slattery, E. T. Co 100.00 

Smith, Mrs. Charles L 10.00 

Smith, Dr. and Mrs. Clement A. 125.00 

Smith, Miss Ida C 10.00 

Sohier, Mr. and Mrs. W. D., Jr. 100.00 

Soule, Mrs. Horace H., Sr 5.00 

Spaulding, Mr. and Mrs. John T. 25.00 

Spaulding, Mrs. William S 50.00 

Stackpole, Miss Alice 5.00 

Stackpole, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis 5.00 

Steinert, Mrs. Alexander 5.00 

Stockton, Charles H 50.00 

Stockton, Mr. and Mrs. Philip 300.00 

Strauss, Mrs. Ferdinand 10.00 

Sturgis, Mrs. S. Warren 10.00 

Sullivan, Mrs. James A 20.00 

Sullivan, Miss Mary G 10.00 

Swartz, Edward M 5.00 

Swift, Mr. and Mrs. George H. ... 100.00 

Sylvester, Mr. Joseph S 50.00 

Taft, Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. ... 200.00 

Taussig, Mrs. Felix 5.00 

Thomas, Miss Helen 20.00 

Thorp, Miss Alice A 10.00 

Travelli, Charles Irwin Fund 100.00 

Trainer, Harry R 5.00 

Tripp, William V., Jr „ 10.00 

Vaughan, Miss Bertha H 25.00 

Vaughn, Walter J 5.00 

Veazie, Miss Mary L 5.00 

Wardwell, Mr. and Mrs. 

Sheldon E 25.00 

Warren, Mr. and Mrs. Bayard 50.00 

Warren, Mrs. George E 200.00 

Warren, Mrs. Samuel D 75.00 

Watters, Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. 5.00 

Welch, Mrs. Francis C „ 50.00 

Weld, Mrs. Charles G 25.00 

Weld, Mrs. Rudolph 10.00 

Whitney, Rev. Arthur B 5.00 

Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. 10.00 

Williams, Mrs. Charles A 5.00 

Williams, Roger 25.00 

Windeler, Mrs. G. H 25.00 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B 50.00 

Wolcott, Mr. and Mrs. S. 

Hunti ngton 25.00 

Wood, Mrs. William M 75.00 

Zepfler, Louis 5.00 



[ 26 ] 



&M 








t 27 ] 




[ 23 ] 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation : 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 

a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL 





FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 

For the Year 1940 



FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 

1 940 

INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 



Since 1881 the Infants' Hospital has provided medical 
treatment for infants without regard to race, creed, 
color or residence. 

Our Research Studies and the training and experience 
given to Doctors, Medical Students and Nurses may 
some day SAVE THE BABY IN YOUR OWN HOME. 

WHAT YOUR DOLLARS GIVE 

Light, heat, food, nurses and doctors for one baby 

for . . . 



One day costs 
Seven days cost 
Twenty days cost 
One month costs 



$4.00 

$28.00 

$80.00 

$120.00 



$200 runs the whole hospital full of sick babies 

for one day. 

$6000 endows a memorial bed in perpetuity. 





[ 2 ] 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL DIRECTOR 



AT this time attention might properly be directed to a resume of a few 
of the clinical and research activities which are in progress for the 
purpose of adding to our knowledge of the best treatment of the sick infants 
entrusted to the care of the Infants' Hospital. The research studies are 
financed by grants in aid, by interested friends and by the Department of 
Pediatrics of the Harvard Medical School. In the main, therefore, they do 
not increase the overhead expenses of the Hospital. For example, the grant 
for the amino acid studies has enabled us to retain constantly a special gradu- 
ate nurse, extra special nurses, when needed, to defray the daily cost of the 
study group of infants, and meet the necessary laboratory expenses. Support 
has also been forthcoming for a number of investigations, among others that 
dealing with cross infections in the ward and the clinical studies of chronic 
nutritional disorders in infants. 

As regards the studies for lessening the spread of infection from one 
patient to another by means of ultraviolet rays, it was found that in the 
cubicles unlighted by ultraviolet lights the incidence of contact infection was 
about 12.7 per cent whereas in the cubicles protected by these rays the inci- 
dence of contact infection was 2.5 per cent. However, the number of 
patients followed and the duration of these tests, did not justify drawing 
final conclusions as to the practicability of installing batteries of ultraviolet 
lights throughout the Hospital. Therefore we are continuing these tests 
which differ somewhat from those formerly employed in that there is a con- 
stant intensity of the rays distributed throughout two of the four wards 
rather than in single cubicles as heretofore. 

As has been mentioned before, investigations are still going forward as 
regards the addition of amino acids, the digestion products of proteins, to 
solutions containing water, sugar and salt, important measures which have 
proved so valuable in saving the lives of infants suffering from severe 
diarrhea and vomiting. With amino acids the solution is virtually a com- 
plete food and can be injected intravenously into infants unable to tolerate 
even water by mouth. The results obtained so far by its use in both the 
acute and chronic disorders of nutrition suggest that this new solution may 
prove to be another and better means for treating infants suffering from 
such diseases. 

Nearly every year there occur in the nurseries of obstetrical hospitals, 
epidemics of diarrhea in newly-born babies. When not treated promptly 
and effectively the mortality is high. However, prompt treatment with sugar 
solution given intravenously, salt solutions injected intravenously and under 
the skin, transfusions of blood, either singly or in combination as each case 

[ 3 ] 




[ 4 ] 



requires, has effectively altered this serious outlook. The value of this form 
of treatment can be illustrated by the fact that of nineteen such babies re- 
cently admitted over a period of a few weeks from nearby institutions, seven- 
teen recovered and only two died. These therapeutic procedures in properly 
selected cases have become permanent and essential adjuncts to the modern 
day treatment of infantile diseases. 

There are many forms of chronic intestinal indigestion which begin 
during the first two years of life. Some are curable and some are not. Those 
which are curable should be recognized early so that proper treatment may 
be instituted. The diagnosis of the two most common types — celiac disease 
and pancreatic fibrosis — has often been difficult. Certain aspects of the 
investigation of this problem are being carried on conjointly with the patho- 
logic department. Recently observations have been made pointing to the 
importance of the alteration in these diseases of the enzymes, elaborated by 
the pancreas, which are necessary for normal digestion. Through a clever 
device it is now possible to secure and determine the presence or absence of 
these enzymes or digestive juices. So now, by this laboratory procedure, we 
have a means of differentiating with a certain degree of accuracy between 
true celiac disease, a condition which may be treated with success, and pan- 
creatic fibrosis, which so far has been invariably fatal. 

Several rather novel changes in the care of prematures have been 
adopted. Formerly each premature infant was fed and the temperature 
taken six times a day. It has been shown that the premature infants have 
done equally well when one night feeding has been omitted and the tempera- 
ture is taken only four times a day. This change in routine has relieved the 
nurses considerably especially during the night hours. 

In attempting to explain the increase in the number of prematures 
admitted this year (106 as compared with 64 in 1939), Dr. S. H. Clifford, 
who has followed the incidence of birth of premature infants in Massachu- 
setts for a number of years, believes that this increase cannot be explained 
on the basis of a greater number of such babies born in the community but 
must be the result of the publicity and public health program that has 
directed more and more premature babies into those premature nurseries 
which are well-equipped to give adequate medical care and nursing service. 

It is regrettable that, owing to the necessity of limiting the daily quota 
to ten beds, it has not been possible to admit all premature infants who have 
applied, particularly unfortunate as the mortality in the air-conditioned 
nursery continues to be so low. 

Likewise, a sufficient number of beds have not been available to meet 
the daily demand for other infants needing hospital care. During an observa- 
tion period of two months over seventy babies were turned away. However 
even in the face of this situation the total number of patients cared for has 
exceeded the total number in former years, — that is, 786 as compared to 

[ 5 ] 



746 in 1939. The average number of patients daily has been 42 as com- 
pared with 35 in 1939. These figures indicate better than words the heavy 
responsibility accepted by the medical and nursing personnel. Critically ill 
infants or those requiring emergency care are never refused. 

Though the theory which led to the construction of the low pressure 
chamber a few years ago for the treatment of patients suffering from acute 
aspiratory obstruction was found to be correct, physiological reactions in 
both the sick patient and normal subject made this low pressure treatment 
impractical for clinical use. The reactions observed in the normal subjects 
clearly defined certain limitations of high altitude flying which had previ- 
ously been discussed but not adequately demonstrated under controlled ex- 
perimental conditions. These interfering complications which included 
middle ear disturbances, "boiling" of the body fluids, and oxygen lack have 
now become of particular importance in aerial warfare. They are such as 
to make combat flying above 25,000 feet extremely hazardous and probably 
to preclude altitudes greater than 32,000 feet in aerial warfare. 

The teaching of undergraduate and graduate students has continued as 
in the past. Graduate teaching continues to become more and more recog- 
nized in the training of pediatricians and this is a problem which we are 
keeping constantly before us in an attempt to maintain a high standard for 
the physicians seeking instruction here. 

In the fall of 1940, Dr. Charles F. McKhann left Boston to accept an 
appointment as Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the 
University of Michigan. Dr. McKhann has been active in the development 
of the work at the Infants' Hospital since 1923 and his leaving to fill this 
post of great responsibility has been keenly felt by the medical and nursing 
staffs and the many friends he made during his sojourn here. 

Appreciation is expressed to the Director of the Hospital for his under- 
standing and helpfulness in making it possible to meet best the many prob- 
lems which arise in ministering to sick babies. We are grateful to the Ladies' 
Aid Society and to the Board of Directors of the Hospital for their con- 
tinued support. Acknowledgment is made to the members of the nursing 
and medical staff and the social service worker, for their stimulating interest 
and cooperation in sharing the responsibilities of the medical care of patients, 
of research, and of teaching. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth D. Blackfan, 

Medical Director. 



[ 6 ] 




MEDICAL STATISTICS 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital 

Dec. 3 1 , 1 939 32 

Number of patients admitted during the year 1940 786 

Number of patients discharged during the year 1940 775 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital 

Dec. 3 1 , 1 940 43 

818 818 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $24.50 to $35.00 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $24.50 88 

Number of patients — reduced rate per week — 50c to 

$24.50 : 644 

Number of patients — free 54 

Total number of Hospital days 15,575 

Average number of patients daily 42+ 

Average days' stay 20 

DISCHARGED 

Relieved 548 

Unrelieved 37 

Transferred to other hospitals 66 

Discharged on parents' own responsibilitv or against advice 4 

Died 120(15.4%) 

27 died in a few hours 
19 died in less than 24 hours 
1 1 died in less than 48 hours 
47.5% died in less than 48 hours. 

G. von L. Meyer, 

Director. 



[ 7 ] 



REPORT OF THE NURSING SERVICE 



THERE have been no additions to the staff during 1940. In 1939 we 
had an unusually good illness record, and in the year's report expressed 
the hope that the installation of the illuminators designed to decrease the 
bacterial content of the air would help to decrease infections among the 
staff as well as the patients. However, our illness record this year shows: 

An average of .96 student off daily for illness or leave of absence 
following illness, as compared with .7 in 1939. 
96 days of illness and 23 days of leave of absence for or following 
illness for the graduate staff, as against 33y2 days of illness and 
26 days of leave of absence in 1939. 

Despite Mark Twain's comment that "statistics is the art of saying 
precisely what you do not know," statistics are useful for comparative pur- 
poses in indicating trends. It is for this reason that we are comparing some 
statistics for the past three years, which reflect the amount of nursing service 
necessary to meet the needs of the Infants' Hospital. 

1938 1939 1940 

Number of patients 723 746 786 

Patients' days 12,940 12,939 15,575 

Prematures 62 64 106 

Intravenous injections 528 358 621 

Hypodermoclyses 456 275 554 

Constant drips 34 27 65 

Transfusions 322 316 467 

X-rays 814 882 999 

Fluoroscopes . 876 1,101 1,097 

In addition to the significant increase in the number of patients' days, atten- 
tion is directed toward the increase also of time-consuming treatments. Our 
time studies show that to give an intravenous injection it takes the time of 
two nurses for twenty-four minutes. The injection is usally accompanied by 
a hypodermoclysis, and one nurse must remain for fifteen minutes longer. 
When a transfusion is given it takes the time of two nurses for twenty-seven 
minutes. These figures, however, do not include the necessary preparation 
of the patient and returning him to his bed, nor the time necessary for the 
sterilization and preparation of the equipment and solutions used. 

Another phase which is not indicated by the statistics is the change from 
little use of medication at the Infants' Hospital to a widespread use of some 
of the newer forms of life-saving chemicals. The increase in the number of 
constant drips, by which salt solution is being introduced constantly into the 
vein for a period of hours, is probably accounted for by the metabolism 
studies, and in such cases these children must have constant nursing care and 
the regular staff is supplemented by special nurses. The increase in the 
figures for the X-Ray Department also speak for themselves. Each time an 
infant goes to X-Ray he must be accompanied by either a nurse or a ward 
helper. One must figure on not less than one-half hour for a visit. All of 
these changes require more nursing service, and the present staff of the 
Infants' Hospital is not sufficient in number adequately to cover the needs. 

Two of the pressing problems which concern the School of Nursing are ^ 
the care of premature babies and the work in the Milk Laboratory, both 

[ 8 ] 



from the point of view of the care of patients and the supervision of student 
nurses. At the present time the graduate nurse in charge of the Milk 
Laboratory is also in charge of the premature babies. It is an extremely un- 
satisfactory arrangement. Dr. Blackfan has pointed out many times that 
feeding is one of the most important factors in the basic care of infants and 
the necessity for having an experienced nurse who can give constant and 
continuous supervision to the preparation and serving of their daily food. 
All student nurses must have experience in the Milk Laboratory, and the 
only stable full-time person in the Milk Laboratory is the ward helper, since 
the graduate nurse must devote part of her time to the premature infants. 
The situation is being further complicated by the change in the number of 
premature babies admitted. It is practically a chronic state of affairs to have 
eight to ten premature babies. In the last five years we have doubled the 
number of premature babies admitted. The result has been that we have 
had to have too many persons going into the Premature Nursery, and this is 
not compatible with the best standards. 

Hospitals naturally are interested in costs, as well as the adequacy of 
nursing service and the achievement of the educational standards for which 
they have assumed responsibility. The School of Nursing furnishes nursing 
care for patients through its student nurses, and through this nursing care 
also contributes to the research studies which are so important a part of the 
work of the Infants' Hospital. In return the student nurses receive neces- 
sary nursing education, both in practice and theory, and maintenance. The 
hours of care furnished by student nurses reach a significant figure in the 
course of a year. As part of a study of The Children's Hospital School of 
Nursing it was estimated that student nurses gave in a single year 57,779.5 
hours of nursing service to the Infants' Hopital. This figure was based on 
six sampling periods in which the actual hours were tabulated for one week 
every two months. Most of the students at the Infants' Hospital are affiliat- 
ing students in the latter part of their second year or in their third year of 
training. It is believed that their service is about seventy-five per cent as 
effective as graduate service. In other words, it would take a student one 
hundred minutes to do something which a graduate could do in seventy-five 
minutes. The replacement of these student hours by graduate hours, trans- 
lated into dollars and cents, would be 

57,779.5 x .75 (effectiveness factor) x $.46 (unit cost) 
per hour -=$19,933.92 

This unit cost per hour of $.46 was arrived at by taking the salary of a 
general duty nurse with cost for maintenance and other charges and finding 
the unit cost per hour for her service. The cash value of student services is 
considerably less than the cost of student education and maintenance. How- 
ever, if all of this student service were replaced by graduate service, it could 
not be done exactly on this basis, as in some instances replacement would 
have to be on the basis of one graduate for one student. For example, a 
student night nurse would have to be replaced by a graduate night nurse. 

The School of Nursing continues to appreciate the friendly interest of 
the Ladies Aid Committee in the school and graduate staff as evidenced by 
their participation in the teas. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stella Goostray, 

Superintendent of Nurses. 
[ 9 j 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1941 

President 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH 

197 Commonwealth Avenue 

Secretary 

JOHN M. HALL 

30 State Street 

Assistant Secretary 
HENRY W. PALMER, Jr. 

Treasurer 

LINCOLN BAYLIES 

441 Stuart Street 

HENRY K. WHITE — Assistant Treasurer 



DIRECTORS 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Mrs. F. I. Amory 

Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 

Lincoln Baylies 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 

Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Hasket Derby 

Charles Devens 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 



Mrs. Alfred Kidder II 
Mrs. Gelston T. King 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George von L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
F. L. W. Richardson, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. S. D. Warren 



Finance Committee 
Lincoln Baylies Charles M. Rotch 



Hospital Director 
George von L. Meyer 



Medical Director 
Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D. 

Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



Physicians 



CONSULTANTS 



William H. Howell, M.D. 
Fritz B. Talbot, M.D. 



Otolaryngologist 
D. Crosby Greene, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. 



t io ] 



ACTIVE STAFF 

(For the academic year 1940 - 41) 
Physicians 



Bronson Crother, M.D. 
Louis K. Diamond, M.D. 
James L. Gamble, M.D. 
Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 



Richard M. Smith, M.D. 

*Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 

Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 



Associate Physicians 



Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
Randolph K. Byers, M.D. 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 



R. Cannon Eley, M,D. 
Charles D. May, M.D. 
Clement A. Smith, M.D. 



Assistant Physician 
Charlotte L. Maddock, M.D. 



Surgeon 
William E. Ladd, M.D. 

Associates 
Robert E. Gross, M.D. 
Franc Ingraham, M.D. 
Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 

Pathologist 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 

Associate 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

Otolaryngologists 
Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 

Associate 
Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Assistant 
Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

Research Associate Laryngologist 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

Psychologist 
Elizabeth E. Lord, Ph.D. 

Supervisor of Nursing 
Miss Harriet Russell, R.N. 



Orthopedic Surgeon 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. 

Associate 
William T. Green, M.D. 

Bacteriologist 
LeRoy D. Fothergill, M.D. 

Associate 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist 
Edwin B. Dunphy, M.D. 

Associates 
Paul Chandler, M.D. 
Edwin B. Goodall, M.D. 
Trygve Gundersen, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
George M. Wyatt, M.D. 

Associate 
Hugh F. Hare, M.D. 

Social Service 
Miss Marion Hall 

Social Service Worker 
Miss Emily J. Marsh 



* On leave of absence. 



[ 11 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE OFFICERS FOR 1941 



Chairman 
MRS. ALFRED KIDDER, II 

Vice-C/iairmen 
MRS. JOHN S. AMES, Jr. MRS. CHARLES F. ADAMS, Ji 

Secretary 
MRS. CHARLES F. HOVEY 

Assistant Secretary 
MRS. WILLIAM S. KEMBLE 

Treasurer 
MRS. FRANKLIN KING 

Assistant Treasurer 
MRS. CHARLES E. CHANNING 

Committee in Cliarge of Nurses' Teas 
MRS. CHARLES C. CUNNINGHAM 

House Committee 
MRS. THEODORE CHASE 

Knitting and Sewing Committee 
MISS ELSIE BREWER 

Visiting Co m mittee 
MRS. FORRESTER A. CLARK 

Social Service Representative 
MRS. JOHN S, AMES, Jr. 



LADES' AID COMMITTEE FINANCIAL REPORT 

YEAR 1940 

MRS. CHARLES E. CHANNING, Treasurer 

January 1, 1940, Balance in Bank $ 495.65 

Dues 765.00 

Donations 353.00 



TOTAL RECEIPTS $1,613.65 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Postage and Printing $ 37.40 

Materials and Supplies 892.99 

Telephone and Telegraph bills — Paul White Concert 1939 13.79 

Share of Teas „ 75.00 

Miss O'Brien's fee 140.00 

Bank Service Charge „ 1.09 

Check cashed Jan., 1940, outstanding Dec, 1939 3.60 

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS $ 1,163.87 

January 1, 1941 — Cash Balance $ 449.78 

[ 12 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE — ANNUAL REPORT 



DURING the year 1940 the Ladies' Aid Committee of the Infants' 
Hospital has met regularly as usual. The meetings have been well 
attended and members have shown much interest in the Hospital. 

It was decided to hold no money-raising entertainment during the year, 
but notices were sent to members stating that contributions in addition to 
the regular dues would be greatly appreciated. The response was most 
generous. 

We have not employed a publicity agent this year, due to there being 
no entertainment. 

The Gardner House teas for the nurses have been held regularly on the 
third Tuesday of each month. A special Christmas tea was held on Decem- 
ber 17th which included the Doctors. A pianist from Ruby Newman's 
Orchestra played during the tea while all the guests joined in singing. 

The Committee has been interested in the repainting and redecorating 
of various parts of the Hospital. The Mother's Waiting Room was re-done 
with new lamp shades, couch-cover, plants and curtains, under the super- 
vision of the House Committee. 

The Knitting and Sewing Committee purchased a large amount of 
wool wholesale and a number of members are knitting sweaters and bonnets 
for the babies according to directions. 

We have had a few resignations during the year and we are pleased to 
have twenty new active members. 



Respectfully submitted. 



Axita H. Hovey, 
Secretary. 




[ 13 ] 




Cbristm 




[ 14 ] 



€beer 





[ 15 ] 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



Agassiz, Mrs. Rodolphe L. 
Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Ames, Mrs. John S., Jr. 
Amorv, Mrs. F. I. 
Anderson, Mrs. Larz 

Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 
Bartlett, Nelson S., Jr. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Nelson S., Jr. 
Baylies, Lincoln 
Beale, Arthur M. 
Bell, Mrs. Stoughton 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward L. 
Blackfan, Dr. K. D. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A. 
Bradley, Mrs. J. Gardner 
Bremer, Mrs. Theodore G. 
Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Cave, Mrs. Edwin F. 
Chapin, Mrs. John R. 
Cheever, Mrs. David 
Clark, Mrs. R. F. 
Clark, Mrs. R. J. 
Converse, Miss E. N. 
Crowninshield, Mrs. F. B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Allen 
Curtis, Mrs. E. R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 

Dane, Mrs. Ernest B., Jr. 
De Forde, Miss Alice 
Derby, Hasket 
Devens, Charles 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 
Ely, Mrs. P. V. R. 

Forbes, Mrs. Allan 
Forbes, F. Murray 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 

Gaston, Mrs. William A. 

Hall, Mrs. John L. 
Hall, John M. 
Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Hamlen, Mrs. P. M. 
Harrington, Mrs. Charles 
Heard, Mrs. John 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. 
Homans, Mrs. John 
Howes, Mrs. Osborne 
Hunnewell, F. W. 
Hlnxewell, Mrs. H. S. 

Iasigi, Mrs. Mary V. 
Ide, Miss E. K. 



Jackson, Mrs. James 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Jr. 

Kaufmann, Mrs. Karl F. 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, II 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M. 
King, Mrs. Gelston T. 

Ladd, Mrs. William E. 
Lawrence, Rev. William 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Liggett, Louis K. 
Lovett, Mrs. R. W. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B. 
Meyer, Geo. von L. 
Meyer, Mrs. F. S. 
Morse, Dr. John Lovett 
Motley, Mrs. E. Predle 

Nickerson, Mrs. Roland W. 

O' Con nell, P. A. 

Palmer, Mrs. Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W., Jr. 
Palmer, Mrs. Henry W., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. F. S. 

Rheault, Mrs. Charles A. 
Richardson, F. L. W., Jr. 
Richardson, Mrs. Homer B. 
Rotch, Arthur G. 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Rotch, Charles M. 

Sargent, Mrs. S. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Henry R. 
Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. 
Sears, Mrs. Philip S. 
Seymour, Robert W. 
Shaw, S. Parkman, Jr. 
Sheafe, Mrs. William 
Summons, Mrs. G. W. 
Stillman, Mrs. Carl S. 
Stockton, Mrs. Philip 

Talbot, Mrs. Fritz B. 
Tarbell, Mrs. John F. 
Thacher, Mrs. T. C. 
Thorndike, Mrs. Augustus 
Tower, Miss E. M. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry 

Warren, Mrs. Fiske 
Warren, Mrs. S. D. 
Webster, Edwin S. 
Windeler, Mrs. G. H. 



[ 16 ] 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



DURING the year 1940 Miss Emily J. Marsh continued the social 
work in the Infant's Hospital on a part time basis in conjunction with 
similar duties on the medical wards of The Children's Hospital. She first 
came to the department in October 1939, a well-trained medical social 
worker from the New York School of Social Work with several years ex- 
perience at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York. 

For the year, she has had ninety-three cases referred to her by the doc- 
tors, which required intensive case work including study of the situation, 
with home visits and a plan for after care worked out with the doctor accord- 
ing to the medical needs. The largest number of babies coming to the atten- 
tion of the Social Service worker presented nutritional and feeding problems 
with a variety of social situations. These social problems were important in 
the individual cases, either because of containing factors which may have con- 
tributed to the disease, or which had to be taken into consideration and per- 
haps modified in order to carry out proper treatment. The following story 
may illustrate the sort of problems arising and the type of work which is 
being done : 

A poorly cared for, very dirty, thirteen-months-old baby with 
a chronic nutritional disturbance, was referred to the social worker 
by the doctor at the time of her second admission to the hospital. 
She was in as poor physical condition as she had been at the time of 
her first admission three months before. It was found that the 
father w T as unable to work because of his health and that the family 
consisting of the parents, the patient and a three-year-old brother 
were being supported by public aid. They were living in one fur- 
nished room which was dark and dirty and many complaints had 
been made that the mother was neglecting the children. 

Several social agencies had been trying to improve conditions 
without success and there had been the threat of calling in the 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty of Children. Instead of 
threatening the mother further, the worker attempted to under- 
stand her and to help her work out some of her problems in regard 
to the children. She was aided in finding an apartment for the 
family and in furnishing it. This was the first home of her own 
she had had since her marriage. The baby was temporarily dis- 
charged to the care of an aunt where she remained until a new 
home was established. When last seen the baby was doing well 
and the mother was proud of her home and the baby's satisfactory 
progress towards health. 

[ 17 ] 



Aside from these cases a number of others not counted statistically have had 
reviews of the social situation and have been given various minor services. 

No attempt has been made to cover the entire number of patients com- 
ing into the hospital or any special diagnostic group. The responsibility has 
rested with the doctors to pick out those cases which seemed to need social 
service help. This has apparently been a sound principle of selection and one 
which has worked out for the better intergradation of medical and social 
problems. 

We hope, however, during the coming year to give a more careful 

analysis of the type of social problems which arise at the Infant's Hospital 

to see if we are giving the best possible service in those cases which need it 

the most. 

Marion W. Hall, 

Director. 




[ 18 ] 





[ 19 ] 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



LINCOLN BAYLIES, TREASURER 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1940 



ASSETS 

Cash $ 18,776.28 

Investments: 

General Fund $466,829.99 

Permanent Fund 277,559.30 

724,389.29 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr., Memorial Hospital 

and Equipment 145,45 1.40 



TOTAL ASSETS $888,6 16.97 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Children's Hospital — Current Account $ 10,722.56 

General Fund „ 447,808.99 

Permanent Fund - 279,374.45 

Beverly Farms (Massachusetts) Real Estate Fund 5,259.57 

Hospital and Equipment Fund _ 145,451.40 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUNDS $888,616.97 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1940 

RECEIPTS 

Income from Investments „ $ 34,695.58 ' 

Donations: 

Greater Boston Community Fund $22,400.23 

Permanent Charity Fund 2,000.00 

Direct Donations for General Purposes 53 5.00 

Eugene Fay Trust Fund 200.00 

Ladies' Aid Committee 140.00 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund „ 100.00 

A. C. Ratshesky Foundation IjO.OO 

Charles A. Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

25,525.23 

Income — Children's Hospital 18,836.00 

Total Receipts $ 79,056.8 1 

[ 20 ] 



PAYMENTS 



Expense — Children's Hospital $ 80,948.74 

Salaries 2,300.00 

Publicity and Advertising 1,034.00 

Auditing 250.00 

Annual Reports (1,000 copies) 169.50 

Office Supplies and Expenses 63.65 

Miscellaneous Expense 50.00 

Pension _ 31.00 

Insurance 25.18 

Printing and Stationery 11.35 



Total Payments $ 84,883.42 



Excess of Payments over Receipts for year ending 

December 31, 1940 ~ $ 5,826.61 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

We have examined the Treasurer's books and records of the Infants' Hospital for 
the year ended December 31, 1940. In connection therewith we examined or verified 
independently the cash balances, bonds and stocks representing the investments of the 
funds. 

In our opinion, the balance sheet and statement of income and expense submitted 
herewith set forth the financial condition of the Hospital at December 31, 1940, and 
the results of its operations of the year then ended. 

GREATER BOSTON COMMUNITY FUND 

Auditors. 



[ 21 1 



January 27, 1941 



SCHEDULE 1 "A" 

Investments Belonging to the General Fund 

December 31, 1940 



BONDS Due 

Arkansas Power & Light Company 1956 

Boston & Maine Railroad — 1st Mortgage 1960 

Boston & Maine Railroad — Income Bonds 1970 

Columbia Gas & Electric Company 1961 

Consolidated Coal Company 1960 

Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railroad 1962 

Gatineau Power Company 1969 

Government of Dominion of Canada 1952 

Illinois Power & Light 1956 

International Paper Company 1955 

Jersey Central Power & Light 1965 

Maine Central Railroad 19+5 

New York Central Railroad 1946 

North Boston Lighting Companies 1947 

Pennsylvania Railroad 1970 

Potomac Edison Company 1961 

Safe Harbor Water Pow r er Company 1979 

Saguenay Power Company, Ltd 1966 

Shawinigan Water & Power Company 1967 

Southern Railway Co., General Mortgage 1956 

United Stock Yards Corp 1951 

Western Maryland Railroad 1977 

Total Bonds 

No. of 

STOCKS Shares 

American & Foreign Power Co. Pfd 100 

American Sugar Refining Co. Pfd 100 

American Superpower Co. Pfd 200 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co 117 

Arkansas Power & Light Pfd 100 

Central Maine Power Co. Pfd 200 

Consolidation Coal Co. Pfd 30 

Consolidation Coal Co. Com 120 

Draper Corporation, Com 875 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Assoc. 6% Pfd 200 

Electric Bond & Share Sec. Co. Com 88 

Electric Bond & Share Co. $5. Pfd 100 

Electric Bond & Share Co. $6. Pfd 100 

General Electric Company Com 800 

General Motors Corp. 5% Pfd 100 

Illinois Central Railroad Pfd 100 

International Match Realization Co 20 

Nashua Mfg. Co. 1st Pfd „ 100 

Nashua Mfg. Co. 2nd Pfd 100 

Saco-Lowell Shops, Class A, Pfd 150 

Saco-Lowell Shops, Common : 150 

Southern Pacific Railroad, Common 100 

Union Pacific Railroad, Pfd 100 

United Drug, Inc 40 

United Fruit Company 100 

United States Steel Co 100 

Total Stocks 

Total General Fund Investments 

[ 22 ] 





Pat- 


Book 


Rate 


Value 


Value 


5 


$10,000 


$ 9,575.00 


4 


3,200 


3,200.00 


4 J / 2 


8,000 


7,505.00 


5 


5,000 


5,219.62 


i 


4,000 


1,000.00 


3/2 


10,000 


9,800.00 


m 


5,000 


4,912.50 


5 


10,000 


9,950.00 


5 


6,000 


6,255.00 


6 


10,000 


9,962.50 


3y 2 


10,000 


10,250.00 


4 


5,000 


5,000.00 


334 


10,000 


9,800.00 


sy 2 


10,000 


10,000.00 


334 


5,000 


4,900.00 


4H 


10,000 


9,950.00 


4 1 / 


10,000 


9,691.25 


414 


10,000 


10,000.00 


4 J /4 


20,000 


12,393.75 


4 


10,000 


9,650.00 


454 


10,000 


9,800.00 


sy 2 


5,000 


4,987.50 




$186,200 


$173,802.12 

$ 5,000.00 

12,625.25 

19,865.00 

21,847.30 

5,000.00 

21,000.00 





47,673.75 

18,600.00 

2,000.00 

9,223.61 

10,750.00 

29,600.00 

12,025.26 

11,215.00 


6,000.00 
4,100.00 
4,000.00 
1,000.00 
5,000.00 
8,002.50 
480.00 
8,020.20 
10,000.00 




$273,027.87 




$446,829.99 



SCHEDULE 1 "B" 



Investments Belonging to the Permanent Fund 



December 31, 1940 



BONDS Due 

Alabama Power Company 1967 

Appalachian Electric Power 1963 

Central Pacific Railroad 19+9 

Central Railroad of Georgia 1959 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Associates 1956 

Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railroad 1970 

Florida Power & Light Company _ 1954 

Great Northern Railroad Company 1973 

Illinois Power & Light Company 1953 

Lawyers Mortgage Investment Trust 1938 

Lexington & Eastern Railroad 1965 

Louisville & Nashville Railroad 1st 

Minnesota Power & Light Company 1978 

Montana Power Company _ 1966 

New York Central & Hudson Railroad 1997 

New York Central & Hudson Railroad 1998 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 1947 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 1948 

New England Power Association 1954 

Northern States Power Company 1967 

Pacific Gas & Electric Company 1964 

Pennsylvania Railroad 1970 

United Drug Company 1953 

Wabash Railroad 1975 

Total Bonds 





Par 


Book 


Rate 


Value 


Value 


\y* 


$10,000 


$10,337.50 


4 


10,000 


11,174.06 


4 


5,000 


5,012.50 


5 


10,000 


5,000.00 


4 


10,000 


9,650.00 


354 


10,000 


10,150.00 


5 


10,000 


9,525.00 


5 


10,000 


9,250.00 


6 


9,000 


8,865.00 


5 


8,075 


2,075.00 


5 


3,000 


2,977.50 


454 


5,000 


5,000.00 


4i/ 


8,000 


8,321.23 


334 


10,000 


9,491.35 


3/2 


5,000 


4,400.00 


3 x /4 


5,000 


4,800.00 


4 


6,000 


6,480.00 


6 


2,500 


2,462.74 


SV 2 


20,000 


19,000.00 


3/2 


10,000 


9,537.50 


4 


5,000 


5,100.00 


334 


5,000 


4,900.00 


5 


20,000 


18,910.83 


sy 2 


12,000 


6,000.00 




$208,575 


$188,420.21 



No. of 

STOCKS Shares 

Aluminum Co. of America 6% Pfd 100 

Boston & Albany Railroad Company _ 15 

Boston Edison Company 100 

Duquesne Lighting Co. 5% 1st Pfd 100 

Electric Bond & Share Co. Pfd. 6% 100 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co 25 

Pennsylvania Railroad 200 

Puget Sound Power & Light Co. Prior Pr. Pfd 85 

Puget Sound Traction Light & Power Pfd 25 

Quincv Market Cold Storage Co. Pfd 16 

Standard Oil Co. of Ohio 5% Pfd 100 

Union Pacific Railroad Co. Com 25 

United Corporation, Pfd 35 

Total Stocks 

Total Permanent Fund Investments 



$10,712.50 
3,070.00 

15,981.95 
9,750.00 

10,325.00 
2,398.34 

10,000.00 
7,613.17 
2,581.25 
1,600.00 

10,300.00 
3,000.00 
1,806.88 

$89,139.09 

$277,559.30 



[ 23 ] 



LADES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 

Mrs. Timothee Adamowski 

Mrs. Charles F. Adams, Jr. 

Mrs. Rodolphe L. Agassiz 

Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Miss Olivia Ames 

Mrs. Francis I. Amory 

Mrs. Harcourt Amory, Jr. 

Mrs. Roger Amory 

Mrs. David Ames 

Mrs. Talbot Baker 

Mrs. James O. Bangs 

Miss Julia A. Barbour 

Mrs. B. Devereux Barker 

Mrs. B. D. Barker, Jr. 

Mrs. Thomas P. Beal, Jr. 

Mrs. Wm. DeFord Beal 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Mrs. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. George Baty Blake 

Mrs. Thomas S. Blumer 

Mrs. John F. Bradley 

***Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley 

Miss Barbara Bremer 

Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 

Miss Elsie C. Brewer 

Mrs. Gorham Brooks 

Mrs. Davenport Brown 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 

Mrs. Frederick M. Burnham 

Miss Nina Burnham 

Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 

Mrs. Samuel Cabot 

Mrs. William Caswell 

Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 

Mrs. Charles E. Channing 

Mrs. Theodore Chase 

Mrs. Frederic C. Church, Jr. 

Mrs. Forrester A. Clark 

Mrs. Henry C. Clark 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Clark 

Mrs. Robert F. Clark 

Mrs. Robert J. Clark 

Mrs. Charles P. Clifford 

Mrs. Sargent F. Collier 

Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 

Mrs. T. Jefferson Coolidge, Jr. 

Mrs. Elwood Cooke 

Mrs. Frederick G. Crocker 

Mrs. Taylor* Crowninshield 

Mrs. Francis B. Crowninshield 

Mrs. Charles C. Cunningham 

Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson 

Mrs. Frederick M. Dearborn, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Devens 

Mrs. J. Lindsay Dexter 

Mrs. William Dexter 



Mrs. Frederick W. Eaton 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

Mrs. John M. Elliot 

Mrs. Clark Emmet 

Mrs. Robert W. Emmons 

Mrs. Robert Faxon 

Mrs. William S. Febiger 

Mrs. John Flint 

Mrs. Lawrence Foster 

Mrs. Donald McKay Frost 

Mrs. Theodore Frothingham, Jr. 

Mrs. John D. Gannett 

Mrs. George P. Gardner, Jr. 

Mrs. Harrison Gardner 

Mrs. Wallace Goodrich 

Mrs. Francis C. Gray 

Mrs. Henry V. Greenough 

Mrs. James C. Green way, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry S. Grew 

Mrs. Brinley Hall 

Mrs. John L. Hall 

Mrs. John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Paul Hamlen 

Mrs. Huntington R. Hardwtck 

***Mrs. Charles Harrington 

Mrs. Richard Harte 

Mrs. Robert F. Herrick, Jr. 

Mrs. Christian A. Herter 

Mrs. John Hoar 

Mrs. Charles E. Hodges 

Mrs. Amor Hollingsworth, Jr. 

Mrs. Valentine Hollingsworth 

Mrs. John Homans 

Mrs. Charles Hovey 

Mrs. Chandler Hovey, Jr. 

Miss Phyllis Howe 

Mrs. James M. Hunnewell 

Mrs. G. Newell Hurd 

Mrs. Benjamin Huntington 

Mrs. Mark Jouett 

Mrs. Edmund S. Kelley, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 

Mrs. William Kemble 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder, 2nd 

Mrs. Franklin King 

Mrs. Gelston T. King 

Mrs. Alexander H. Ladd, Jr. 

Miss Katharine Ladd 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. Gardiner M. Lane 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence 

Miss Luisita A. Leland 

Mrs. Charles E. Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 

Mrs. James Means 

Mrs. Houghton Metcalf 

Mrs. Charles G. Mixter, Jr. 



[ 24 1 



Mrs. Sherman Morss 
Mrs. J. Lothrop Motley 
Mrs. Richard Olney 
Mrs. Hamilton Osgood 
Mrs. Franklin H. Palmer 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Augustin Parker, Jr. 
Mrs. Francis S. Parker 
Mrs. Frederick Parker 
Mrs. William A. Parker 
Mrs. Thomas U. Perkins 
Mrs. Marc Peter, Jr. 
Mrs. Andrew J. Peters 
Mrs. Carleton Pike 
Mrs. Brooks Potter 
Mrs. George Putnam 
Mrs. Winthrop Pyemont 
Mrs. Laurence Reeve 
Mrs. Harrison G. Reynolds 
***Mrs. Charles F. Richardson 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Mrs. J. Hampden Robb 
Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 
Mrs. William A. Russell 
Mrs. Edward Roberts 
Mrs. Henry B. Sawyer 
Mrs. H. Eugene Sawyer 
Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 
Mrs. Philip S. Sears 
Mrs. Richard D. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Louis A. Shaw 
Mrs. S. Parkman Shaw 



Mrs. F. Foster Sherburne 
Mrs. Stephen W. Sleeper 
Mrs. C. Wharton C. Smith 
***Miss Ida C. Smith 
Mrs. William S. Spaulding 
Miss Faith Stanwood 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. Richard C. Storey 
Mrs. Richard C. Storey, Jr. 
Mrs. George H. Swift 
Mrs. Nathan Talbot 
Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 
Mrs. Thomas C. Thacher, Jr. 
Mrs. Warren Thayer 
Mrs. Sears Tuckerman 
Mrs. John A. Tuckerman 
Mrs. Bayard Warren 
***Mrs. George E. Warren 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Mrs. Donald C. Watson 
Mrs. George S. Weld 
Miss Mary West 
Mrs. Edward A. Whitney 
Mrs. Norton Wigglesworth 
Mrs. G. Herbert Windeler 
Mrs. Nathaniel T. Winthrop 
Miss Katherine Winthrop 
Mrs. Roger Wolcott 
Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr. 
Mrs. William S. Youngman 



***Honorary Members (no dues) 




[ 25 ] 



1940 CONTRIBUTORS 



Anonymous Contributions (68) $4, 

Abbott, Mrs. Gordon 

Abbott, Mr. Gordon, Jr 

Adams, Miss Ethelind 

Agassix, Mrs. R. L 

Agoos, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon 

Alcaide, Mr. and Mrs. A. S 

Aldrich, William T 

Aldrich, Mrs. William T 

Allan, Mrs. Bryce J 

American Mut. Liability Ins. Co. 

Ames, Mrs. John S 

Ames, Mr. and Mrs. John S., Jr 

Ames, Mrs. Oliver 

Amory, Mr. and Mrs. Francis I 

Atkinson, Edward W 

Aver, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F 

Bacon, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Edward 

Baer, Mrs. Louis 

Baldwin, Mrs. George S 

Barbour, Miss Julia A 

Barlow, Miss Mary L 

Barnet, Solomon J 

Bartol, Dr. and Mrs. John W 

Baxter, Mrs. Gregory Paul „ 

Baylies, Lincoln 

Beal, Miss Edith L 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P 

Beal, Mrs. William DeFord 

Bemis, Mrs. A. Farwell 

Bemis, Albert Farwell Charity 
Trust 

Bidwell, Mr. & Mrs. Raymond B. 

Bigelow, Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Bigelow, Mrs. Henry Forbes 

Blackfan, Dr. and Mrs. K. D 

Blake, Mrs. George B 

Blumer, Mrs. Thomas S 

Boston Lying In Hosp. Employees 

Boston Mfg. Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Employees 

Bowden, Mrs. Herbert L 

Bradlee, Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. 

Bradley, Mrs. Ralph 

Brandegee, Mr. and Mrs. 

Edward D 

Bremer, Miss Barbara 

Bremer, Miss Sarah F 

Brewer, Miss Susan H 

Brooks, Gorham 

Brown, Mrs. Edwin P 

Buff, Miss Alice E .... 

Burgess, John K 

Burke, Mrs. Edmund J 

Busk, Mr. and Mrs. F. Wadsworth 

Cabot, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 

Campbell, Mrs. Wallace M 

Carters Ink Co. and Employees 

Carter, John & Co., Inc 



964.14 Chamberlain, Mrs. George N 25.00 

25.00 Chapin, Mrs. Henry B 10.00 

50.00 Chase, Arthur T. .'.. 4.00 

25.00 Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Talbot C 20.00 

50.00 Chase, Mrs. Theodore 35.00 

100.00 Children's Hospital Employees 39.50 

10.00 Church, Mr. and Mrs. F. C., Jr 100.00 

100.00 City and County Employees 15.00 

50.00 Clapp, Misses Elizabeth W. and 

100.00 Mary C 2.00 

7.14 Clark, Dr. and Mrs. George 10.00 

50.00 Clark, Miss Katherine F 5.00 

300.00 Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel T. 25.00 

25.00 Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. 25.00 

50.00 Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Philip M 25.00 

10.00 Conant, Mr. & Mrs. Augustine B. 5.00 

150.00 Condit, Miss Louise 10.00 

Converse, Mrs. Costello C 100.00 

Converse, Miss Eliza Nott 5.00 

10.00 Coolidge, Mr. and Mrs. J. 

10.00 Templeman 50.00 

5.00 Countway, Francis A 100.00 

20.00 Craig, Mrs. Helen M. 50.00 

25.00 Crocker, Mrs. George H 25.00 

5.00 Crowninshield, Mr. and Mrs. 

10.00 Francis B 100.00 

10.00 Cunningham, Mr. and Mrs. Guy... 5.00 

10.00 Curtis, Albert H 10.00 

5.00 Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 25.00 

250.00 Curtis, Mrs. Louis, Sr 25.00 

50.00 Cutler, Mr. and Mrs. Roger W 125.00 

25.00 

.Dalton, Henry R 50.00 

15.00 Damon, J. Linfield 10.00 

20.00 Dane, Mr. and Mrs. E. B., Jr 50.00 

50.00 Dane, Mrs. John 25.00 

100.00 Davenport, Mrs. George H 25.00 

15.00 Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

20.00 Dennett, Mr. and Mrs. Carl P 250.00 

25.00 Desmond Publishing Company 5.00 

5 00 Devens, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 35.00 

Dexter, Charles 10.00 

10.00 Dexter, Mrs. Philip 50.00 

15.00 Dexter, Mr. and Mrs. William 50.00 

25.00 Dexter, Mr. and Mrs. William 

10 00 Endicott 25.00 

Dooley, William J 35.00 

35.00 Drury, Mrs. Samuel S 25.00 

25.00 Duane, Mr. and Mrs. James C. 20.00 

25.00 

10.00 Elliot, Mr. and Mrs. John M 50.00 

25.00 Emmons, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. 25.00 

25.00 Employers Group & Employees 5.00 

10.00 Endicott, Mr. and Mrs. H. 

25.00 Wendell 200.00 

10.00 Endicot, Miss Katherine 50.00 

20.00 Evans, Mrs. David J 5.00 

Fales, Mrs. Herbert E „ 25.00 

10.00 Falvev, Mrs. Donald 25.00 

5.00 Fay, Mrs. Henry H 10.00 

1.00 Febiger, William S. Company 150.00 \ 

5.00 "William Jay Fegan Day" 200.00 

[ 26 ] 



Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. Bennett S. 
Fessenden, Mr. and Mrs. Sewall H 
First National Bank of Boston and 

Affiliated Employees 

Fish, Miss Margaret A 

Fisher, Mrs. Richard T 

Flagg, Dr. and Mrs. Elisha 

Fogg, Mr. and Mrs. George P 

Folsom, Grenville W 

Forbes, Dr. and Mrs. Alexander... 

Forbes, Allan 

Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. 

Foster, Mrs. Alfred D 

Foster, Miss Hilda S 

Francis, Mr. and Mrs. George 

Tappan 

French, Miss Katharine 

Friedman, Mrs. Max 

Frost, Mr. and Mrs. Donald 

McKay 

Frost, Mrs. Rufus H 

Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 

Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A 

Gannett, Robert T 

Gardner, Mrs. George P 

Garritt, Miss Elizabeth M 

Gerry, Mrs. E. Peabody 

Gilmore, Mrs. George L 

Goldthwait, Mrs. Joel E 

Goodwin, Mrs. Harry M 

Grandin, Mr. and Mrs. John L 

Grant, Judge Robert 

Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Francis C 

Gray, Regin a 1 d 

Gray, Mrs. Reginald 

Gray, Roland 

Greenway, Mr. & Mrs. James C. 

Grew, Edward W 

Grew, Mrs. Edward W 

Grew, Mr. and Mrs. Henry S 

Guild, Mrs. S. Eliot 

Hall, Mrs. George A 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John L 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John M 

Hallowell, Jones & Donald 

Halsey, Mrs. Martha Fuller 

Hammond, Mr. and Mrs. H. L 

Hammond, Mrs. Samuel 

Hanington, Miss Elizabeth F 

Hartt, Mrs. Arthur W 

Hasenfus, Nathaniel J 

Hatfield, Dr. and Mrs. Hugh K.... 

Heard, Mrs. John 

Hedge, Henry R 

Herman, Mrs. Joseph M 

A Friend 

Herter, Mr. and Mrs. Christian A. 

Hoag, Mrs. Charles R 

Hobbs, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin W. 

Holland, Mrs. Edward G 

Hollingsworth, Mr. Amor 1 

Hollingsworth, Amor, Jr 

Holmes, Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. 

Hopkins, Miss Emma A 

Hornblower, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 



100.00 Houghton, Mr. and Mrs. 

.200.00 Frederick 25.00 

Howe, James C 50.00 

5.00 Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr.... 10.00 

5.00 Hunnewell, Mrs. Henry S 50.00 

50.00 Hunnewell, Mr. James M 100.00 

20.00 Hunnewell, Mrs. James M 50.00 

5.00 Hutchins, Mrs. Edward W 5.00 

10 -°0 T , n TT 

25 qq Jackson, Dr. Henry 10.00 

1000 Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 10.00 

^'qq Jardine, Janette G 5.00 

5 00 Jenkins Brothers 2.00 

1000 J ones > Mr - and Mrs - William E 50.00 

Jordon, Mrs. Robert 150.00 

5 Q0 Jouette, Mr. and Mrs. Mark R 75.00 

10-00 Kemble, Mr. and Mrs. William T. 50.00 

10.00 Keystone Mfg. Co. Emp 5.00 

Kidder, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 2nd 50.00 

50.00 Kimball, Mrs. Benjamin P 10.00 

2-00 Kimball, Mrs. Thatcher R 10.00 

5.00 King, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 50.00 

50.00 King, Mrs. Gelston T 150.00 

100 00 King, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P 50.00 

200 00 K1 °P ot > A 15 - 00 

' n n Kneppenberg, Henrv C, Jr 7.14 

r " Kiskin, Bibvl 1 6.00 

5.00 ' 

25.00 Ladd, Mr. and Mrs. Alex H., Jr.... 20.00 

10.00 Ladd, Dr. and Mrs. William E 50.00 

10.00 Lamb, Mrs. Horatio A 25.00 

25.00 Lane, Miss S. Belle 5.00 

10.00 Langill, Leslie 20.00 

25.00 Lavelle, Marie A 5.00 

25.00 Lawrence, James & Company 45.00 

25.00 Lawrence, Miss Mary B 5.00 

10.00 Lee, Mr. and Mrs. John C 10.00 

50.00 Leland, Miss Elizabeth C 5.00 

25.00 Leland, Mrs. Lester 100.00 

10.00 Leland, Miss Luisita 15.00 

25.00 Lever Brothers Company 500.00 

10.00 Leveroni, Judge Frank 25.00 

Levi, Miss Elizabeth F 5.00 

25.00 Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. George, Jr.... 15.00 

100.00 Libertv Mut. Ins. Co. Employees... 1.00 

25 - 00 Lindsav, Mrs. Thomas P 100.00 

3 °- 00 Long, Mr. Harry V 5.00 

20.00 Loring, Mr. Augustus P., Jr 40.00 

20.00 Loring, Mrs. Augustus P., Jr 25.00 

5 - 00 Loring, Miss Marjorie C 25.00 

5 - 00 Lothrop, Miss Mary B 10.00 

6 / 2S Luce, Stephen B 15.00 

:> - 00 Lyman, Mrs. Henry 100.00 

10 - 00 Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald T.... 25.00 

10 - 00 Lyman, Professor Theodore 100.00 

2.00 - ' 

15.00 Mahady, E. F. Company 10.00 

5.00 Manna^ Marie 10.00 

50.00 Manson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Edgar... 5.00 

25.00 Mason, Mrs. Austin B 20.00 

15.00 Mead, Mrs. F. S 25.00 

25.00 Meadows, Mr. W. J 10.00 

,000.00 Means, Mrs. James 20.00 

40.00 Meigs, Mrs. M. S 2.50 

5.00 Merrill, Mrs. Luther M 10.00 

5.00 Metcalf, Mrs. Thomas N 50.00 

200.00 Meyer, Mrs. Slatonstall 10.00 

[ 27 ] 



Meyer, Mrs. Saltonstall „ 10.00 

Michael, Arthur 10.00 

Mitchell, Miss Lilian 25.00 

Monks, Mrs. George H 25.00 

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. 5.00 

Moors, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W.... 25.00 

Morse, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H 5.00 

Moseley, Mrs. F. S 200.00 

Motley, Mr. E. P 25.00 

Motley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lothrop... 15.00 

Murphy, Miss Helena A 15.00 

Newell, Dr. Franklin S 25.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Employees 43.40 

Newman, Mrs. Samuel J 10.00 

Nickerson, Mrs. Roland 50.00 

Olsen, Olaf 15.00 

Orlandini, Mrs. Vittorio 5.00 

Paine, John B 50.00 

Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. 100.00 

Parker, Augustin H 15.00 

Parker, Mrs. J. Harleston 25.00 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. William 

Amo ry 100.00 

Parks, Mrs. William A 20.00 

Peavy, Mrs. Leopold 5.00 

Peters, Mrs. W. Y 10.00 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T 10.00 

Phelan, Mrs. James J 25.00 

Philbrick, Mrs. M. E 35.00 

Pickering, Miss Minnie M 5.00 

Pickman, Mr. and Mrs. Dudley L. 20.00 

Pitman, Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. 10.00 

"In Memory of Louis Pokat" 5.00 

Preston Moss & Co. Employees 20.00 

Railway Express Employees „.. 4.00 

Rantoul, Edward L 10.00 

Ratshesky, Mrs. Theresa S 5.00 

Reed, Miss Emily S 15.00 

Reed, Miss Ida B 15.00 

Reidy, Mrs. Maurice A 5.00 

Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs. 

Harrison G 25.00 

Rice, Harrv L 15.00 

Rice, Mr. John C 25.00 

Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles F 10.00 

Richardson, Dr. Edward P 25.00 

Richardson, Mrs. John 5.00 

Richardson, William K 25.00 

Riley, Miss Mabel Louise 75.00 

Rimmer, Mrs. Charles P 25.00 

Ripley, Alfred L 40.00 

Robinson, Edward P 5.00 

Robinson, Fred N 5.00 

Rotch, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G 255.00 

Rothwell, James Mason 10.00 

Rousmaniere, Miss Mary S 10.00 



Sanderson, E. L 

Sargent, Dr. Ara N 

Sayles, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W.... 

Schumaker, Dorothy G 

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R 

Searle, Miss Martha E 

Sears, Mr. and Mrs. Francis P 



5.00 

5.00 
10.00 

6.00 
15.00 

3.00 
25.00 



Sears, Mrs. Helen N 10.00 

Sears, Herbert M „ 50. 00 

Sears, Mr. and Mrs. R. D., Jr lo!oo 

Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. S. P., Jr 25.00 

Shepherd, Miss Emily B 10.00 

Sherburne, Mrs. Maud T 10.00 

Sias, Mrs. Charles D 50.OO 

Slattery, E. T. Company 105.00 

Slayton, Miss Maud S 10.00 

Smith, Mrs. Charles L 10.OO 

Smith, Dr. and Mrs. Clement A 125.00 

Smith, Miss Ida C 5. 00 

Soule, Mrs. Horace H., Sr 10.00 

Spaulding, Mr. and Mrs. John T. 25.00 

Spaulding, Mrs. William S 25.00 

Stackpole, Miss Alice 5.00 

Stackpole, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis 5.00 

State Employee Group 5.00 

Stearns, R. H 5.00 

Steinert, Mrs. Alexander 5.00 

Stockton, Charles H 50.00 

Stockton, Mr. Philip 300.00 

Stone, Miss Mary P 100.00 

Strauss, Mrs. Ferdinand 10.00 

Sturgis, Mrs. S. Warren 10.00 

Sullivan, Miss Mary G 5.00 

Swift, Mr. and Mrs. George H 100.00 

Sylvester, Mrs. Joseph S 50.00 

Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. William O. 50.00 

Thomas, Miss Helen 25.00 

Thorndike, Dr. and Mrs 10.00 

Thorp, Miss Alice A „ 10.00 

Travelli, Charles Irwin Fund 100.00 

Trainer, Mr. Harry R 10.00 

Tuckerman, Mr. and Mrs. 

Bayard, Jr 100.00 

United Fruit Company & Revere 

Sugar Refinery Employees 10.00 

Vaughan, Miss Bertha H 

Vaughn, Walter J 

Wardell, Mr. and Mrs. 

S hel don E 

Warren, Mrs. George E 

Warren, Mrs. Samuel D „ 

Watters, Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. 

Weld, Mrs. Charles G 

Welch, Mr. and Mrs. Francis C... 

Weld, Mrs. Rudolph 

Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. Wm., Jr. 

Whitney, Rev. Arthur B 

Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. 

Wiggin, Maude L 

Williams, Mrs. Charles A.... 

Williams, Roger 

Windeler, Mrs. G. H 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B 

Winthrop, Miss Katherine 

Wolcott, Mrs. Roger, Jr 

Wolcott, Mr. and Mrs. S. 

H u nti ngton 

Wood, Mrs. William M 

Woodard, Mrs. Anita Clark 

Wyzanski, M. E. & C. E 

Zepfler, Louis 5.00 



25.00 


5.00 


25.00 


200.00 


100.00 


5.00 


25.00 


5.00 


10.00 


50.00 


5.00 


15.00 


2.50 


5.00 


25.00 


25.00 


50.00 


100.00 


100.00 


25.00 


75.00 


15.00 


25.00 



[ 28 ] 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation: 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL 







-■■■%:: 




FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

For the Year 1941 



Jtt iHfmnnam 



DR. KENNETH D. BLACKFAN 
November 29, 1941 



Medical Director 
1923 - 1941 

THOMAS MORGAN ROTCH 
Professor of Pediatrics 



Distinguished as a Teacher, a 

Clinician, and in Research; 

a life devoted to the well being of 

young children. 



FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

1941 

INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 

Since 1881 the Infants' Hospital has provided medical 
treatment for infants without regard to race, creed, 
color or residence. 

Our Research Studies and the training and experience 
given to Doctors, Medical Students and Nurses may 
some day SAVE THE BABY IN YOUR OWN HOME. 

WHAT YOUR DOLLARS GIVE 

Light, heat, food, nurses and doctors for one baby 

for . . . 

One day costs $4.00 

Seven days cost $28.00 

Twenty days cost $80.00 

One month costs $120.00 

$200 runs the whole hospital full of sick babies 

for one day. 

$6000 endows a memorial bed in perpetuity. 




t 2 ] 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL DIRECTOR 



DURING the past year the Staff of the Infants' Hospital has made a 
devoted effort to sustain the high standards of diagnostic skill and of 
patient care which Dr. Blackfan established over the eighteen years of his 
leadership. The several investigations in which he was keenly interested 
have also been carried forward. 

The study of ultraviolet light as a means of preventing cross-infection 
between ward patients, which was begun by Dr. Charles F. McKhann, was 
continued throughout the past year by Dr. Glidden L. Brooks, according 
to a very carefully designed plan which involved innumerable throat cul- 
tures on patients and on personnel. Cultures of samples of ward air were 
also made. The lamps for this study were supplied by the Westinghouse 
Company. They were placed in the south wing of both the upper and lower 
wards. The patients in the north wings served as controls. The results 
of this study do not convincingly support the efficacy of ward air disinfection 
by this method and for the present at least, it seems wise to put this problem 
aside. 

Dr. Alfred T. Shohl has been continuing his studies of the practicability 
of giving mixtures of amino acids by intravenous infusion. The amino acids 
are the units of the chemical structure of proteins. The proteins of the food 
intake may be regarded as large bundles of these substances which are un- 
fastened by the processes of digestion. The individual amino acids are then 
absorbed and are used for the building and repair of the body proteins. 
When there is very severe disturbance of the gastro-intestinal function, as so 
often happens in infants, the processes of release and absorption of these sub- 
stances are more or less completely interfered with. In these situations the 
only way of supplying the amino acids is to introduce them into the blood 
stream. This amounts to attemping to feed an infant through his veins and 
may seem a rather bold experiment. But, as you know, the introduction of 
water, salts and glucose by intravenous infusion is an established procedure 
and is often dramatically life-saving. So it is quite reasonable to make the 
same attempt with the amino acids. Dr. Shohl has gone about it very 
cautiously and has found that if certain rules are observed as regards the 
concentration of the substances, the total quantity given and the rate of 
infusion, no untoward effects are observed beyond, occasionally, a slight rise 
in temperature. As regards benefit, he has produced the direct evidence 
that an infant can be kept in positive nitrogen balance by this means of 
supply. A positive nitrogen balance is demonstrated by finding less nitrogen 
in the excreta that is provided by the amino acids administered. This means 
that these substances have been utilized, not only to the extent of preventing 

[ 3 ] 



wastage of body tissues, but to also produce growth. This study has thus 
had an excellent outcome and gives us a therapeutic procedure which will 
have a wide utility. 

This amino acid therapy will find its application chiefly in the very 
acute and severe disturbances of nutrition. Dr. Charles D. May has been 
studying a situation of chronic malnutrition which has long baffled pedia- 
tricians and which is known as celiac disease. The word celiac simply refers 
to the protuberant abdomen which these infants display. In this disease 
there is a great wastage of the food intake and the infants get into a state of 
extreme emaciation. Thirty years ago very few of these infants survived. 
Then it was found that if they were carefully fed a certain type of food 
many of them would pull through. Recovery, however, was a very slow 
process usually occupying several years. Dr. May has found that by giving 
them a crude extract of liver together with a crude extract of yeast, which 
contains the B. group of vitamins, they can be brought back to a normal 
state of nutrition within three or four months. This is an important and a 
brilliant medical discovery. Dr. May does not regard his work as completed. 

The crude extracts of liver and of yeast contain a great many individual 
chemical substances. So what remains to be done is to find out which sub- 
stance or group of substances is actually responsible for the curative effect 
of the crude extracts of liver and yeast. This is the present stage of Dr. 
May's work. He has gone to the war in charge of the laboratory equipment 
of the Harvard unit. He has left a plan for the progress of this study, 
which needless to say, will be carefully and diligently followed. 

It can be anticipated with certainty that the war will make difficult the 

maintenance of the high standards of the Infants' Hospital. A reduction of 
the number of internes and residents will undoubetedly be necessary. This 
can only be made up for by a larger expenditure of time on the wards by the 
senior members of a probably greatly reduced staff. But it is not to be 
doubted that the necessary devotion to the main purpose of the Hospital, the 
care of its patients, will be forthcoming. 



[ 4 ] 




MEDICAL STATISTICS 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital 

Dec. 3 1 , 1 940 43 

Number of patients admitted during the year 1941 664 

Number of patients discharged during the year 1941 664 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital 

Dec. 31, 1941 43 



707 707 



Number of patients — weekly rate — $24.50 to $35.00 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $24.50 76 

Number of patients — reduced rate per week — 50c to 

$24.50 571 

Number of patients — free 17 

Total number of Hospital days 14,598 

Average number of patients daily 39+ 

Average days' stay 21 + 

DISCHARGED 

Relieved 485 

Unrelieved : 32 

Transferred to other hospitals 50 

Discharged on parents' own responsibility or against advice 4 

Died 93 (14.0%) 



664 



29 died in a few hours 
1 7 died in less than 24 hours 
10 died in less than 48 hours 
60% died in less than 48 hours 



G. vox L. Meyer, 

Director. 



[ 5 ] 




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[ 7 ] 



REPORT OF THE NURSING SERVICE 



DURING the year 1941, 57 student nurses from The Children's 
Hospital School of Nursing and approximately 250 students from 
schools which affiliate with us have received teaching in the care of infants 
at the Infants' Hospital. 

There have been no changes in the supervisory and head nurse staff. 
With the change in night nurses' hours, from a schedule in which they were 
on from 7 P.M. to 7 A.M. with two hours off duty after twelve o'clock to a 
straight shift from 11 P.M. to 7 A.M. with a night off every other week, 
we lost four hours of service from Infants' Hospital each night. This has 
been replaced by having a person on half-time at Infants' Hospital and half- 
time at The Children's Hospital. It is an unsatisfactory arrangement, be- 
cause it means that the graduate nurse is on the medical wards of The Chil- 
drens' Hospital for four hours and then goes over to take care of the prema- 
tures, which is not good nursing practice. We believe that in the interest of 
good nursing care for prematures the person who is now half-time at the 
Infants' Hospital should be made full-time, when personnel is available. 

Although there has been a definite shortage of nurses, our numbers at 
Infants' Hospital have been kept stable, but we do not know how much 
longer this will continue so far as graduate nurses are concerned. It does 
not seem probable that there will be any shortage in the number of student 
nurses. 

Although we had somewhat fewer patients in 1941 than in 1940, the 
number of time-consuming treatments for the nursing service did not de- 
crease but increased. The comparative figures show : 

1940 1941 

Intravenous injections 621 586 

Hypodermoclyses 554 596 

Constant drips 65 155 

Transfusions 467 569 



1707 1906 

The illness record for students and graduates is slightly better than in 1940. 

1940 1941 

Average number of students off duty daily for ill- 
ness or leave of absence following illness 96 .95 

Total days of illness for graduate staff 96 65^ 

Total days of leave of absence following illness for 

graduate staff 23 16j^ 

[ 8 ] 



At one period in November the Infants' Hospital really operated in the 
isolation unit of The Children's Hospital since all infants, except prema- 
tures, were transferred, owing to an exposure to chicken pox. 

The death of Dr. Blackfan is keenly felt by the nursing staff. 



Respectfully submitted, 



December 31, 1941 



Stella Goostray, 
Superintendent of Nurses. 




[ 9 ] 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



AGAIN this year social work for patients in the Infants' Hospital has 
been confined to that group picked by the doctors as especially needing 
this type of service. Under this plan seventy-four babies have been referred 
by the doctors for evaluation of home conditions or for help in working out 
satisfactory plans at the time of discharge. This principle of selection con- 
tinues from last year but is a departure from that of former years when 
every baby's social situation was routinely reviewed by the social worker. 

Practically all of the group referred to us have been visited in their 
homes, the parents interviewed on various occasions at home and in the 
hospital, and the social agencies in the community consulted for information 
and solicited for aid. Sometimes it requires a long time to work out satis- 
factory solutions to difficult problems and usually social service has to con- 
tinue after the child has left the hospital. Fifty-two patients received some 
Social Service attention anywhere from one to three months while the other 
twenty-two required help for four months or over. 

Again this year the largest number of problems centered around feeding 
and nutritional disturbance diagnoses. Feeding difficulties develop early 
and are involved often with a great deal of emotional difficulty especially 
for the mother. Any baby who refuses food because of illness, or even when 
there is no organic disease, becomes an object of great concern with undue 
importance placed on the food intake. For the mother food becomes a 
measure of success and the symbol of authority; for the child, a means of 
power and advantage. It is sometimes a slow process to help a mother take 
a reasonable, understanding attitude towards feeding and develop the proper 
methods of management. 

Besides this type of intensive problem, there are financial needs of 
families to be met by referral to relief giving agencies, budgetary advice and 
incidental help from our own funds. For example, we supplied train fare 
for a patient who needed to come to the hospital, but could not afford the 
long trip from the western part of the State. On a very cold Saturday 
afternoon we supplied emergency assistance to a young mother who was 
without heat or food and who already had one baby in the hospital with 
pneumonia and another ill at home with a serious ear infection. Also, cloth- 
ing has been provided from time to time to needy families from a supply 
donated to us for this purpose. 

Other services, such as arranging convalescent care, nursing supervision 
at home and transportation have been given as the needs arose. The most 
dramatic baby of the year was the little foundling discovered in a paper bag 
in the Fenway by a passing workman and brought here for haven and medi- 
cal treatment. This healthy baby boy, after observation in the hospital 

[ 10 ] 



found a name, a foster home and social workers responsible for his future 
well being through the State Division of Child Guardianship. This illus- 
trates how the social work in the hospital is dependent on and related to the 
functions and effort of other social agencies in the community. 

A student, being trained in medical-social work, has received some of 
her practical experience under the supervision of the Infants' Hospital Social 
Worker, who has also contributed to the ward teaching of student nurses 
by means of case presentations in informal groups. Although sharing her 
time with The Children's Hospital, the worker actually has her office in the 
Infants' Hospital and is therefore geographically very accessible to the staff 
of this institution. 

Emily J. Marsh, Social Worker, 

Infants' Hospital. 




r 5i ] 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1942 

President 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH 

197 Commonwealth Avenue 

Secretary 

CHARLES M. ROTCH 

30 State Street 

Assistant Secretary 
HENRY W. PALMER, Jr. 

Treasurer 

LINCOLN BAYLIES 

441 Stuart Street 

HENRY K. WHITE — Assistant Treasurer 



DIRECTORS 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 
Mrs. F. I. Amory 
Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 
Lincoln Baylies 
Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 
Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 
Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 
Hasket Derby 
Charles Devens 
Mrs. Samuel Eliot 
John M. Hall 
Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 
Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 
Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 



Mrs. Alfred Kidder II 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George von L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
F. L. W. Richardson, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. S. D. Warren 



Mr. Henry K. White 



Lincoln Baylies 



Finance Committee 
Henry K. White 



Charles M. Rotch 



Hospital Director 
George von L. Meyer 



Acting Medical Director 
James L. Gamble, M.D. 



Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



CONSULTANTS 



Physicians 

William H. Howell, M.D. 
Fritz B. Talbot, M.D. 
Allan M. Butler, M.D. 



Roentgenologist 
Merrill C Sosman, M.D. 



[ 12 ] 



ACTIVE STAFF 

(For the academic year 1941-1942) 



Bronson Crothers, M.D. 
Louis K. Diamond, M.D. 
Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 
Clement A. Smith, M.D. 



Physicians 



Richard M. Smith, M.D. 
Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 
Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 



Randolph K. Byers, M.D. 



Associate Physicians 



R. Cannon Eley, M.D.* 
Charles D. May, M.D.* 



Surgeon 
William E. Ladd, M.D. 



Orthopedic Surgeon 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. 



Associate Surgeons 

George D. Cutler, M.D. 
Robert E. Gross, M.D. 
Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. 
Thomas H. Lanman, M.D.* 
Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 



Associate Orthopedic Surgeon 
William T. Green, M.D. 

Bacteriologist 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 



Pathologist 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 

Associate Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

Otolaryngologist 

Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D.* 

Associate Otolaryngologists 

Charles I. Johnson, M.D.* 
Charles W. Ferguson, M.D. 

Research Associate Laryngologist 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 



Ophthalmologist 
Edwin B. Dunphy, M.D. 



Dermatologist 
E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 



Roentgenologist 
Edward B. D. Neuhauser, M.D. 



Social Service 
Miss Marion Hall 



Psychologist 
Elizabeth E. Lord, Ph.D. 

Supervisor of Nursing 
Miss Harriet Russell, R.N. 

* Leave of Absence to Join the Armed Forces. 

[ 13 ] 



Social Service Worker 

Miss Emily J. Marsh 
(Resigned April, 1942) 

Miss Kathleen Scott 
(beginning June, 1942) 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE OFFICERS FOR 1942 



Chairman 
MRS. ALFRED KIDDER, II 

Vice-Chairman 
MRS. JOHN S. AMES, Jr. 

Second Vice-Chairman 
MRS. WILLIAM BENJAMIN BACON 

Secretary 
MRS. CHARLES FOX HOVEY 

Assistant Secretary 
MISS ANDREE CASSELS 

Treasurer 
MRS. FRANKLIN KING 

Committee in Charge of Nurses' Teas 
MRS. CHARLES C. CUNNINGHAM 

Social Service Representatives 
MRS. JOHN S. AMES, Jr. 

War Service Committee 

(A joint committee of members of the Welfare Committee of The Children's Hospital, 

and the Ladies' Aid Committee) 

Soon after the treacherous attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor, the Welfare 
Committee of The Children's Hospital organized, under the able and inspiring leader- 
ship of Mrs. Bartlett Harwood, a War Service Committee. 

Through the courtesy of Mrs. William E. Russell and Mrs. Harwood, I was asked 
to serve and the members of the Ladies' Aid Committee of the Infants' Hospital were 
also invited to collaborate in the new venture. 

The joint War Service Committee has been functioning harmoniously since the 
middle of February. Of the three subcommittees formed, a member of the Ladies' Aid 
Committee has been graciously included as Co-Chairman. 

The service was sanctioned by the Director of both Hospitals, by the Board of 
Managers of The Children's Hospital, and by our own Board of Directors. 

LADIES' AID COMMITTEE FINANCIAL REPORT 

MRS. FRANKLIN KING, Treasurer 
January 1st, 1941 — January 1st, 1942 

RECEIPTS 

Balance January 1st, 1941 $ 449.78 

Dues :. 900.00 

Donations 614.50 

Donation for Chair 25.00 

$1,989.28 



PAYMENTS 

Bed in memory of Mr. Philip Stockton $ 600.00 

Materials and Supplies for Hospital 731.26 

Postage and Printing _ 34.22 

Chair 29.75 

Welfare Committee Share in Teas (two years) 150.00 

Bank Service Cha rge s 1.50 

$1,546.73 

Balance January 1st, 1942 442.55 

$1,989.28 
[ 16 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE — ANNUAL REPORT 



DURING the year 1941 the Ladies' Aid Committee of the Infants' 
Hospital has met regularly as usual. There have been a few resigna- 
tions but we are pleased to have 12 new active members. 

This year for the second time it was decided not to hold a money- 
raising entertainment. Members were asked to make contributions in addi- 
tion to their regular dues and the response was very generous. 

The House Committee has carried out its plan of redecorating and 
refurnishing the Mothers' Room and the History Room. The Knitting and 
Sewing Committee furnished wool and directions for members to make the 
knitted garments which are needed for the babies. Toys were bought and 
collected during the year. 

At the May meeting the Committee voted to donate $600 to name a 
bed in honour of Mr. Philip Stockton. Also, at the May meeting Dr. 
Richard Smith gave an interesting talk about new methods used in the 
Hospital to combat and prevent disease. Miss Hall, head of the Social 
Service Department, spoke at the December meeting on the work done by 
that Department to help the patients and their families. 

Th teas for the Nurses have been held regularly at Gardner House on 
the third Tuesday of each month. The Christmas tea on December 16th 
was well attended by both Doctors and Nurses. 

Two ideas presented to the Committee by the Board of Directors are 
still under consideration. The first is the suggested establishment of a 
counter in the lobby of The Children's Hospital at which would be sold 
various articles for the benefit of the Infants' Hospital. The second is the 
use of advertising and publicity to make the public conscious of the Infants' 
Hospital as an independent institution which needs separate support. Com- 
mittees have been appointed to investigate and report on these proposals. 

The Committee feels deeply the loss of Doctor Blackfan. His splendid 
work and devotion to the Hospital are greatly appreciated and will be long 
remembered. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anita H. Hovey, 

Secretary. 

[ 17 ] 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



LINCOLN BAYLIES, TREASURER 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1941 



ASSETS 

Cash $ 18,107.58 

Accounts Receivable 1,590.00 

Investments: 

General Fund - $410,73 5.46 

Permanent Fund 272,937.02 

683,672.48 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr., Memorial Hospital 

and Equipment 145,45 1.40 

TOTAL ASSETS $848,821.46 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Children's Hospital — Current Account $ 6,539.85 

General Fund 411,998.76 

Beverly Farms (Massachusetts) Real Estate Fund 4,609.03 

Hospital and Equipment Fund 145,451.40 

Permanent Fund 280,055.74 

Accounts Payable 166.6S 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUNDS $848,821.46 



statement of income and expense 
for the year ended december 31, 1941 

rece: pts 

Income from Investments $ 35,666.29 

i))u .oils: 

Greater Boston Community Fund $ 21,575.00 

Permanent Charity Fund 2,000.00 

Direct Donations for General Purposes 445.00 

Eugene Fay Trust Fund 200.00 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund 100.00 

Charles A. Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

24,370.00 

Income — Children's Hospital 20,028.14 

Miscellaneous Income 21.10 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $ 80,085.53 

[ 18 ] 



PAYMENTS 



Expense — Children's Hospital - $ 81,904.78 

Salaries 2,804-.00 

Publicity and Advertising 456.28 

Audit of Children's Hospital 210.00 

Insurance - 200.00 

Rent and Light 165.00 

Office Furniture and Equipment 116.28 

Miscellaneous Expenses 101.55 

Office Supplies and Expenses 45.35 

Printing and Stationery 15.96 

TOTAL PAYMENTS 

Excess of Payments over Receipts for year ending 

December 31, 1941 _ 



$ 86,019.20 



$ 5,933.67 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

We have examined the Treasurer's books and records of the Infants' Hospital for 
the year ended December 31, 1941. In connection therewith we examined or verified 
independently the cash balances, bonds and stocks representing the investments of the 
funds. 

In our opinion, the balance sheet and statement of income and expense submitted 
herewith set forth the financial condition of the Hospital at December 31, 1941, and 
the results of it* operations of the year then ended. 

GREATER BOSTON COMMUNITY FUND 
Auditors. 




[ 19 ] 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE GENERAL FUND 



December 31, 1941 



BONDS 



Due 



Arkansas Power and Light Company 1956 

Boston & Maine Railroad — 1st Mortgage 1960 

Boston & Maine Railroad — Income Bonds 1970 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 1971 

Columbia Gas & Electric Corporation 1961 

Consolidation Coal Company 1960 

Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railroad 1962 

Gatineau Power Company 1969 

Government of Dominion of Canada 1952 

Illinois Power & Light Corporation 1956 

International Paper Company 1955 

Jersey Central Power & Light Company 1965 

Maine Central Railroad 1945 

New York Central Railroad Company 1946 

North Boston Lighting Companies 1947 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 1970 

Potomac Edison Company 1961 

Safe Harbor Water Power Company 1979 

Saguenay Power Company, Ltd. ._ 1966 

Shawinigan Water & Power Company 1967 

Southern Railway Company 1956 

United Stock Yards Corporation 1951 

Western Maryland Railway 1977 

Total Bonds 





Par 


Book 


Rate 


Value 


Value 


5 


$10,000.00 


$ 9,575.00 


4 


3,200.00 


3,200.00 


4^ 


8,000.00 


7,505.00 


5 


10,000.00 


8,650.00 


5 


5,000.00 


5,219.62 


5 


4,000.00 


1,000.00 


3/ 2 


10,000.00 


9,800.00 


334 


5,000.00 


4,912.50 


5 


10,000.00 


9,950.00 


5 


6,000.00 


6,255.00 


6 


10,000.00 


9,962.50 


3 x /4 


10,000.00 


10,250.00 


4 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


334 


10,000.00 


9,800.00 


3 J/2 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


334 


5,000.00 


4,900.00 


4 J / 2 


10,000.00 


9,950.00 


4 J /4 


10,000.00 


9,691.25 


454 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


4 J / 2 


10,000.00 


6,196.95 


6 


10,000.00 


9,650.00 


454 


10,000.00 


9,800.00 


sy 2 


5,000.00 


4,987.50 




$186,200.00 


$176,255.32 



STOCKS 



No. of 
Shares 



American Telephone & Telegraph Co 117 

Arkansas Powder & Light Company, Pfd 100 

Central Maine Power Company, Pfd 200 

Draper Corporation 875 

E. I. duPont de Nemours _ 35 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Assoc. 6% Pfd 200 

First National Bank of Boston 125 

General Electric Company 800 

General Motors Corp. 5% Pfd 100 

Nashua Manufacturing Co. — 1st Pfd 100 

Nashua Manufacturing Co. — 2nd Pfd 100 

Pacific Gas and Electric 200 

Phillips Petroleum 125 

Phoenix Insurance Company - 60 

Saco-Lowell Shops, Common 150 

Saco-Lowell Shops, Pfd 150 

Southern Pacific Railroad, Common 100 

Standard Oil of New Jersey 125 

Union Pacific Railroad, Pfd 100 

United Fruit Company 100 

United States Steel Company 100 

Total Stocks 

Total General Fund Investments 

[ 20 ] 



$ 21,692.27 

5,000.00 

21,000.00 

47,673.75 

5,285.00 

18,600.00 

5,703.13 

29,600.00 

12,025.26 

6,000.00 

4,100.00 

5,075.00 

5,711.15 

5,580.00 

1,000.00 

4,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,411.88 

8,002.50 

8,020.20 

10,000.00 

$234,480.14 

$410,735.46 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE PERMANENT FUND 



December 31, 1941 



BONDS Due 

Alabama Power Company 1967 

Central Pacific Railway Company 1949 

Central of Georgia Railway Company 1959 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Associates .._ 1956 

Florida Power & Light Company 1954 

Great Northern Railroad Company 1973 

Illinois Power & Light Corporation 1953 

Kentucky Utilities 1970 

Lawyers Mortgage Investment Trust 

Lexington & Eastern Railroad 1965 

Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co 2003 

Minnesota Power & Light Company 1978 

Monongahela Railway Company 1966 

Montana Power Company 1966 

New England Power Association „ 1954 

New York Central & Hudson River 

Railroad Company 1998 

New York Central & Hudson River 

Railroad Company 1997 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 1948 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 1947 

Northern States Power Company 1967 

Pacific Gas & Electric Company 1964 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 1970 

United Drug Company Bonds 1953 

Wabash Railway 1975 

Total Bonds 





Par 


Book 


Rate 


Value 


Value 


4^ 


$10,000.00 


$10,337.50 


4 


5,000.00 


5,012.50 


5 


10,000.00 


5,000.00 


4 


10,000.00 


9,650.00 


5 


10,000.00 


9,525.00 


5 


10,000.00 


9,250.00 


6 


9,000.00 


8,865.00 


4 


10,000.00 


10,450.00 




7,267.50 


1,267.50 


5 


3,000.00 


2,977.50 


4i/4 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


41/2 


8,000.00 


8,321.23 


¥A 


10,000.00 


10,250.00 


334 


10,000.00 


9,491.35 


5/2 


20,000.00 


19,000.00 


3^2 


5,000.00 


4,800.00 


3^ 


5,000.00 


4,400.00 


6 


2,500.00 


2,462.74 


4 


6,000.00 


6,480.00 


3^ 


10,000.00 


9,537.50 


4 


5,000.00 


5,100.00 


334 


5,000.00 


4,900.00 


5 


20,000.00 


18,910.83 


5 1 / 


12,000.00 


6,001.00 




$207,767.50 


$186,989.65 



No. of 

STOCKS Shares 

Allied Chemical and Dye 35 

Aluminum Company of America, Pfd 100 

Boston and Albany Railroad Company 15 

Boston Edison Company 400 

Duquesne Light Company, Pfd. 100 

Kennecott Copper Company 150 

Liggett and Myers _ 60 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co 25 

Pennsylvania Railroad 200 

Puget Sound Traction Light & Power, Pfd 25 

Quincy Market Cold Storage Co., Pfd 16 

Standard Oil Company of Ohio, Pfd 100 

Union Pacific Railroad Co., Common 25 

Total Stocks 

Total Permanent Fund Investments 



$ 5,683.13 

10,712.50 
3,070.00 

15,981.95 
9,750.00 
5,590.20 
5,280.00 
2,398.34 

10,000.00 
2,581.25 
1,600.00 

10,300.00 
3,000.00 

$ 85,947.37 

$272,937.02 



[ 21 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 

Mrs. Timothee Adamowski 

Mrs. Charles F. Adams, Jr. 

Mrs. David Ames 

Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Miss Olivia Ames 

Mrs. Francis I. Amory 

Mrs. Harcourt Amory, Jr. 

Mrs. Roger Amory 

Mrs. Benjamin Bacon 

Mrs. Talbot Baker 

Mrs. James O. Bangs 

Miss Julia A. Barbour 

Mrs. B. Devereux Barker 

Mrs. B. D. Barker, Jr. 

Mrs. William DeFord Beal 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Mrs. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. George Baty Blake 

Mrs. John Blanchard, 2nd 

Mrs. Thomas S. Blumer 

Mrs. Cameron Bradley, Jr. 

***Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley 

Miss Barbara Bremer 

Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 

Miss Elsie C. Brewer 

Mrs. Davenport Brown 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 

Mrs. Frederick M. Burnham 

Miss Nina Burnham 

Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 

Mrs. Samuel Cabot 

Miss Andree Cassels 

Mrs. William Caswell 

Mrs. Charles E. Channing 

Mrs. Theodore Chase 

Mrs. Joseph Choate, III 

Mrs. Frederic C. Church 

Mrs. Forrester A. Clark 

Mrs. Henry C. Clark 

Miss Margaret Clark 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Clark 

Mrs. Robert F. Clark 

Mrs. Robert J. Clark 

Mrs. Eliot Codman 

Mrs. Sargent F. Collier 

Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 

Mrs. T. Jefferson Coolidge, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick G. Crocker 

Mrs. Taylor Crowninshield 

Mrs. Charles C. Cunningham 

Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson 

Mrs. John A. V. Davies 

Mrs. Frederick M. Dearborn, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Devens 

Mrs. J. Lindsay Dexter 

Mrs. William Dexter 

Mrs. Frederick W. Eaton 



Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

Mrs. William Emmett, II 

Mrs. Robert W. Emmons 

Mrs. Robert Faxon 

Mrs. William S. Febiger 

Mrs. John Flint 

Mrs. Lawrence Foster 

Miss Eleanor Frothingham 

Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 

Mrs. Theodore Frothingham, Jr. 

Mrs. Marshall Fulton 

Mrs. John D. Gannett 

Mrs. George P. Gardner, Jr. 

Mrs. Harrison Gardner 

Mrs. Wallace Goodrich 

Mrs. Francis C. Gray 

Mrs. Henry V. Greenough 

Mrs. James C. Greenway, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry S. Grew 

Mrs. Brinley M. Hall 

Mrs. John L. Hall 

Mrs. John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Paul Hamlen 

Mrs. Huntington R. Hardwick 

***Mrs. Charles Harrington 

Mrs. Richard Harte 

Mrs. Andrew H. Hepburn 

Mrs. Robert F. Herrick, Jr. 

Mrs. Christian A. Herter 

Mrs. John Hoar 

Mrs. Charles E. Hodges, Jr. 

Mrs. Amor Hollingsworth, Jr. 

Mrs. Valentine Hollingsworth 

Mrs. Chandler Hovey, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 

Mrs. James M. Hunnewell 

Mrs. Benjamin Huntington 

Mrs. G. Newell Hurd 

Mrs. Mark Jouett 

Mrs. Edmund S. Kelley, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 

Mrs. William Kemble 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder, 2nd 

Mrs. Franklin King 

Mrs. Gelston T. King 

Mrs. Alexander H. Ladd, Jr. 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. Gardiner M. Lane 

Mrs. Howard Lapsley 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence 

Miss Luisita A. Leland 

Mrs. Charles E. Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 

Mrs. James Means 

Mrs. Houghton Metcalf 

Mrs. Charles Meyer 

Mrs. Charles G. Mixter, Jr. 

Mrs. Sherman Morss 



[ 22 ] 



Mrs. J. Lothrop Motley 
Mrs. Hamilton Osgood 
Mrs. Franklin H. Palmer 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Augustin H. Parker, Jr. 
Mrs. Francis S. Parker 
Mrs. Frederick Parker 
Mrs. William A. Parker 
Mrs. Thomas N. Perkins, Jr. 
Mrs. Marc Peter, Jr. 
Mrs. Andrew J. Peters 
Mrs. Carleton Pike 
Mrs. Arnold Porter 
Mrs. Brooks Potter 
Mrs. George Putnam 
Mrs. Winthrop Pyemont 
Mrs. Lawrence Reeve 
***Mrs. Charles F. Richardson 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Mrs. Joseph P. Richardson 
Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 
Mrs. William A. Russell 
Mrs. Renouf Russell 
Mrs. Henry B. Sawyer 
Mrs. H. Eugene Sawyer 
Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 
Mrs. Philip S. Sears 
Mrs. Richard D. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Louis A. Shaw 
Mrs. S. Parkman Shaw 
Mrs. F. Foster Sherburne 
Mrs. J. Henry Sleeper 



Mrs. Stephen W. Sleeper 

***Miss Ida C. Smith 

Mrs. William S. Spaulding 

Miss Faith Stanwood 

Mrs. Malcolm C. Stewart 

Mrs. Philip Stockton 

Mrs. R. C. Storey 

Mrs. Richard C. Storey, Jr. 

Mrs. George H. Swift 

Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 

Mrs. Nathan Talbot 

Mrs. Thomas C. Thacher, Jr. 

Mrs. Warren Thayer 

Mrs. John A. Tuckerman 

Mrs. Sears Tuckerman 

Mrs. Bayard Warren 

Miss Camilla Warren 

***Mrs. George E. Warren 

Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 

Mrs. Donald C. Watson 

Mrs. George S. Weld 

Miss Mary West 

Mrs. Howard Whiteside 

Mrs. Edward A. Whitney 

Mrs. Norton Wigglesworth 

Mrs. G. Herbert Windeler 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Winthrop 

Mrs. Roger Wolcott 

Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr. 



*** Honorary Members 




[ 23 ] 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Ames, Mrs. John S., Jr. 
Amorv, Mrs. F. I. 
Anderson, Mrs. Larz 



Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 
Bartlett, Nelson S., Jr. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Nelson S., Jr. 
Baylies, Lincoln 
Beale, Arthur M. 
Bell, Mrs. Stoughton 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward L. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A. 
Bradley, Mrs. J. Gardner 
Bremer, Mrs. Theodore G. 
Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 



Jackson, Mrs. James 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Jr. 



Kaufman n, Mrs. Karl F. 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred II 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M. 



Ladd, Mrs. William E. 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Liggett, Louis K. 
Lovett, Mrs. R. W. 



Merriman, Mrs. Roger B. 
Meyer, George von L. 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble 



Cave, Mrs. Edwin F. 
Chapin, Mrs. John R. 
Clark, Mrs. R. F. 
Clark, Mrs. R. J. 
Converse, Miss E. N. 
Crowninshield, Mrs. F. B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Allen 
Curtis, Mrs. E. R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 



Nickerson, Mrs. Roland W. 



O'CONNELL, P. A. 



Palmer, Mrs. Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W. 
Palmer, Mrs. Henry W., Jr. 
Palmer, Henry W., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. F. S. 



Dane, Mrs. Ernest B., Jr. 
DeForde, Miss Alice 
Derby, Hasket 
Devens, Charles 



Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 
Ely, Mrs. P. V. R. 



Forbes, F. Murray 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 



Hall, Mrs. John L. 
Hall, John M. 
Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Hamlen, Mrs. P. M. 
Harrington, Mrs. Charles 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. 
Homans, Mrs. John 
Hovey, Mrs. Charles F. 
Howes, Mrs. Osborne 
hunnewell, f. w. 



Iasigi, Mrs. Mary V. 
Ide, Miss E. K. 



Richardson, F. L. W., Jr. 
Richardson, Mrs. Homer B. 
Rotch, Arthur G. 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Rotch, Charles M. 



Sargent, Mrs. S. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Henry R. 
Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. 
Sears, Mrs. Philip S. 
Seymour, Robert W. 
Shaw, S. Parkman, Jr. 
Sheafe, Mrs. William 
Simmons, Mrs. G. W. 
Stillman, Mrs. Carl S. 
Stockton, Mrs. Philip 

Talbot, Mrs. Fritz B. 
Tarbell, Mrs. John F. 
Thacker, Mrs. T. C. 
Tower, Miss E. M. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry 

Warren, Mrs. Fiske 
Warren, Mrs. S. D. 
Webster, Edwin S. 
Windeler, Mrs. G. H. 



[ 24 ] 




[ 25 ] 



1941 CONTRIBUTORS 



Anonymous Contributors (73) $6 

Abbott, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon, Jr. 

Agassiz, Mrs. R. L 

Agoos, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon 

Alcaide, Mr. and Mrs. A. S 

Aldrich, William T 

Aldrich, Mrs. William T 

Alford, Miss Martha A 

Allan, Mrs. Bryce J 

Allen, Mrs. Thomas „ 

Ames, Mr. and Mrs. David 

Ames, Mr. and Mrs. John S., Jr.... 

Ames, Mrs. Oliver ..„ 

Amory, Mr. and Mrs. Francis I.... 
Aver, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F 

Bacon, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Edward 

Baer, Mrs. Louis 

Baldwin, Mrs. George S 

Barbour, Miss Julia A - 

Barlow, Miss Mary L 

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. Joel M 

Barry, Miss Anna Kingman 

Bartol, Dr. and Mrs. John W 

Bartol, Louis C 

Baxter, Mrs. Gregory Paul 

Beal, Miss Edith L 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P 

Bell, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 

Bemis, Albert Farwell Charity 
Trust 

Bigelow, Mrs. Henry Forbes 

Blackfan, Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
D 

Blake, Mrs. George B 

Blake, Mr. and Mrs. G. B 

Blumer, Mrs. Thomas S 

Bradlee, Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. 

Bremer, Miss Sarah F 

Buff, Miss Alice E 

Burgess, Mrs. Theodore P 

Burke, Mrs. Edmund J 

Cabot Godfrey L. Inc. Employees 

Campbell, Mrs. Louise 

Campbell, Walter M 

Carter, John & Co. Inc 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B 

Chard Motors Inc. Employees 

Chase, Miss Alice P 

Chase, Arthur T 

Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Talbot C 

Chase, Mrs. Theodore 

Children's Hospital Employees 

Church, Mr. and Mrs. F. C 

City and County Employees..- 

Clapp, Misses Elizabeth and 

M a ry C 

Clark, Dr. and Mrs. George O 

Clark, Miss Katherine F 



,355.00 Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel T. 100.00 

85.00 Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Philip M.... 25.00 

50.00 Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J 25.00 

100.00 Coburn, Mr. William H 5.00 

19.23 Colby Memorial Trust 25.00 

50.00 Committee of the Permanent 

50.00 Charity Fund „ 2,000.00 

100.00 Condit, Miss Louise 10.00 

100.00 Connolly, Mr. and Mrs. Richard... 10.00 

10.00 Converse, Miss Eliza Nott 10.00 

10.00 Coolidge, Mr. and Mrs. 

200.00 J. Templeman 50.00 

25.00 Countway, Francis A 100.00 

50.00 Craig, Mrs. Helen M 50.00 

150.00 Crocker, Mrs. George H 25.00 

Crowninshield, Mr. and Mrs. 

Francis B 100.00 

10.00 Cunningham, Mrs. Charles C 125.00 

10.00 Cunningham, Mrs. Guy 5.00 

5.00 Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. Louis „ 25.00 

20.00 Curtis, Mrs. Louis, Sr 25.00 

20.00 Curtiss, Mr. and Mrs. Frederic H. 25.00 

5.00 Cutler, Mr. and Mrs. Roger W 150.00 

2.00 Curtis, Albert H 10.00 

10.00 

5.00 Dabnev, F. L. & Co. Emplovees 25.00 

10.00 Dalton, Henry R .". 50.00 

5.00 Dane, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 75.00 

250.00 Davenport, Mrs. George H 25.00 

10.00 Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

DeNormandie, Mr. and Mrs. P. Y. 25.00 

15.00 Desmond Publishing Co 5.00 

100.00 Devens, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 50.00 

Dexter, Mrs. Philip „ 50.00 

30.00 Dexter, Mr. and Mrs. William 

20.00 Endicott 25.00 

25.00 Dooley, William J 25.00 

25.00 Drury, Mrs. Samuel S 25.00 

25.00 Duane, Mr. and Mrs. James C 50.00 

25.00 

10.00 Elliot, Mr. and Mrs. John M 50.00 

10.00 Emmons, Mrs. R. W 50.00 

10.00 Endicott, Mr. and Mrs. 

H. Wendell 200.00 

5.00 Endicott, Miss Katherine 50.00 

5.00 Evans, Mrs. David J 5.00 

5.00 

5.00 Fales, Mrs. Herbert E 25.00 

10.00 Falvey, Mrs. Donald 25.00 

1.00 Farrar, Frederick A 25.00 

15.00 Fav, Eugene F. Estate 200.00 

4.00 Febiger, William S. Co 200.00 

20.00 Federal Emplovees Group 5.00 

25.00 "William Jay Fegan Day" 200.00 

54.50 Fessenden, Mr. and Mrs. 

100.00 Sewall H 200.00 

8.77 First National Bank of Boston 

Employees 5.00 

2.00 Fish, Miss Margaret A 5.00 

10.00 Flagg, Dr. and Mrs. Elisha 20.00 

3.00 Fogg, Mr. and Mrs. George P 5.00 

[ 26 ] 



Folsom, Grenville W 

Forbes, Dr. and Mrs. Alexander... 

Forbes, Allan 

Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. 

Foster, Mrs. Alfred D 

Foster, Miss Hilda S 

Fox, Miss Edith M 

Francis, Mr. and Mrs. 

George Tappan 

Friedman, Mr. and Mrs. Max 

Frost, Mr. Donald McKay 

Frost, Mrs. Rufus H 

Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 

Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A 



Gardner, Mrs. George P 200.00 

Gerry, Mrs. E. Peabody 5.00 

Gilmore, Mrs. George L 10.00 

Goodrich, Mrs. Wallace 25.00 

Grav, Mr. and Mrs. Francis G 25.00 

Reginald 25.00 

Mrs. Reginald 25.00 

Roland 10.00 

Grew, Mrs. Edward W 10.00 

Grew, Mr. and Mrs. Henry S 25.00 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund 100.00 



Gray, 
Gray, 
Gray, 



Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John L 100.00 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John M 30.00 

Halsey, Mrs. Martha Fuller 20.00 

Hammond, Mr. and Mrs. H. L 10.00 

Hammond, Mrs. Samuel 5.00 

Hanington, Miss Elizabeth F 5.00 

Hatfield, Dr. and Mrs. Hugh K.... 10.00 

Hayden, Miss V. Pauline 100.00 

Hedge, Henry R 2.00 

Henderson, Mr. Donald D. F 10.00 

Herman, Mrs. Joseph M 15.00 

Herter, Mr. and Mrs. Christian A. 50.00 

Hillis, Mrs. Robert 25 

Hoag, Mrs. Charles R 25.00 

Holland, Mrs. Edward G 25.00 

Hollingsworth, Amor, Jr 25.00 

Holmes, Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. 5.00 

Hood, H. P. & Sons Employees 10.00 

Hopkins, Miss Emma A 5.00 

Houghton, Mrs. Clement S 50.00 

Howe, James C 50.00 

Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. 10.00 

Hunnewell, Mr. James M 100.00 

Hunnewell, Mrs. James M 50.00 

Hunnewell, Miss Jane B 5.00 

Inches, Mr. and Mrs. Henderson... 10.00 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 10.00 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. William K. 10.00 

Jardine, Janette G 5.00 

Jenkins Brothers 2.00 

Johnson, Elizabeth E 5.00 

Jordan, Mrs. Robert 150.00 

Kemble, Mr. and Mrs. William T. 25.00 

Kidder, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred, II... 50.00 

Kimball, Mrs. Benjamin P 15.00 

Kimball, Mrs. Thatcher R 10.00 



10.00 King, Mrs. Gelston T 150.00 

25.00 King, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P 50.00 

10.00 Klopot, A 15.00 

5.00 

10.00 Ladd, Dr. and Mrs. William E 100.00 

10.00 Lamb, Mrs. Horatio A 25.00 

25.00 Lane, Mrs. Gardiner M 25.00 

Lane, S. Belle 5.00 

5.00 Lawrence, Mrs. Amory A 25.00 

10.00 Lawrence, Miss Mary B 5.00 

50.00 Lee, Mr. and Mrs. John C 10.00 

2.00 Leland, Miss Elizabeth C 5.00 

5.00 Leland, Miss Luisita 15.00 

50.00 Lever Brothers Company 500.00 

Leveroni, Judge Frank 25.00 

Levi, Miss Elizabeth F 5.00 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. George, Jr. 15.00 

Long, H. V 5.00 

Loring, Mrs. Augustus P., Jr 25.00 

Loring, Mr. Augustus P., Jr 50.00 

Loring, Mr. and Mrs. Caleb 50.00 

Loring, Miss Marjorie C 25.00 

Lothrop, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. 15.00 

Lothrop, Miss Mary B 5.00 

Lyman, Mrs. George H 5.00 

Lyman, Theodore 100.00 

Mahady, E. F. Company 10.00 

Manson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Edgar 5.00 

Mason, Mrs. Austin B 20.00 

Mayosmith, Mr. and Mrs. 

Richmond 5.00 

Mead, Mrs. F. S „ 10.00 

Meadows, Mr. W. J 10.00 

Means, Agnes B 20.00 

Meredith & Grew Inc. Employees 10.00 

Merrill, Mrs. Luther M 10.00 

Metcalf, Mrs. Thomas N „ 100.00 

Mitchell, Miss Lilian 25.00 

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. 5.00 

Moors, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W.... 25.00 

Morse, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H.... 5.00 

Moseley, Mrs. F. S 200,00 

Motley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lothrop 15.00 

Murphy, Miss Helena A 12.00 

N. E. Power Ass'n & Affiliated 

Co. Emp 5.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Employees 11.50 

Newman, Mrs. Samuel J 10.00 

O'Brien, Miss Harriet E 4.00 

Olsen, Olaf 15.00 

Orlandini, Mrs. Vittorio 5.00 

Page, Mrs. E. B 20.00 

Paine, John B 50.00 

Parker, Augustin H 15.00 

Parker, Mrs. Augustin H., Jr 5.00 

Parker, Mrs. J. Harleston 25.00 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. 

William Amory 100.00 

Parks, Mrs. William A 20.00 

Partridge, Mrs. Richard 5.00 

Peavy, Mrs. Leopold 5.00 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T 10.00 



[ 27 ] 



Phelan, Mrs. James J 25.00 

Pickering, Miss Minnie M 5.00 

Pickman, Mr. and Mrs. Dudley L. 20.00 

Pokat Printing Company 5.00 

Rantoul, Edward L 10.00 

Rantoul, Mrs. Neal 100.00 

Ratshesky, Mrs. Theresa S 10.00 

Reed, Miss Emily S 15.00 

Reed, Miss Ida B 15.00 

Rice, Harry L 15.00 

Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles F 10.00 

Richardson, Mrs. John _ 5.00 

Richardson, William K 25.00 

Rilev, Miss Mabel Louise 75.00 

Ripley, Alfred L 40.00 

Robb, Mr. and Mrs. J. Hampden 50.00 

Robinson, Edward P 5.00 

Robinson, Fred N „ 10.00 

Rotch, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G 225.00 

Rothwell, James Mason 10.00 

Rousmaniere, Miss Mary S 10.00 

Rowley, Dr. Francis H 5.00 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Robert 10.00 

Sayles, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W.... 5.00 

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R 15.00 

Searle, Miss Martha E...~.,.. 5.00 

Sears, Herbert M 50.00 

Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. S. P., Jr 25.00 

Shepard, Miss Emily B 10.00 

Sherburne, Mrs. Maud T 10.00 

Sias, Mrs. Charles D - 50.00 

Slattery, E. T. Company 100.00 

Smith, Mrs. Charles L 10.00 

Soule, Mrs. Horace H., Sr 10.00 

Spaulding, Mr. and Mrs. John T. 25.00 

Spaulding, Mrs. William S 25.00 

Stackpole, Miss Alice - 5.00 

Stackpole, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis 10.00 

Staniford, Mrs. Daniel 10.00 

State Employee Group _ 5.13 

Stearns, R. H 5.00 

Steinert, Mrs. Alexander 5.00 

Stimson, Mr. Frederic Josup 10.00 



Stone, Miss Mary P 100.00 

Stone, Mrs. Robert G 20.00 

Sturgis, Mrs. S. Warren 10.00 

Sullivan, Miss Mary G 10.00 

Sun Oil Company Employees 5.00 

Swift, Mr. and Mrs. George H 100.00 

Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. William O. 50.00 

Thomas, Miss Helen 20.00 

Thorp, Miss Alice A 10.00 

Trainer, Mr. Harry R 10.00 

Travelli, Charles Irwin Fund 100.00 

Tripp, Mr. William V., Jr 20.00 

United Fruit & Revere Sugar 

Refinery Co. Employees 15.00 

Vaughan, Miss Bertha H 25.00 

Vaughan, Walter J 5.00 

Veazie, Miss Mary L 5.00 

Vincent, Dr. Beth.. 25.00 

Wardwell, Mr. and Mrs. 

Sheldon E 25.00 

Warren, Mr. and Mrs. Bayard 50.00 

Warren, Mrs. George E 200.00 

Watters, Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. 10.00 

Weld, Mrs. Charles G 25.00 

Weld, Mrs. Rudolph 10.00 

White, Mr. and Mrs. Henry K 50.00 

Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. 

William, Jr 50.00 

Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. 10.00 

Wiggin, Maude L 2.50 

Williams, Roger 25.00 

Willis, Edith M....„ 5.00 

Winsor, Mrs. Frederick 10.00 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B 50.00 

Winthrop, Miss Katherine 100.00 

Wolcott, Mr. and Mrs. 

S. Huntington „ 25.00 

Wolters, Miss Helene 25.00 

Wood, Mrs. William M 50.00 

Wyzanski, M. E. and C. E. Trust 25.00 

Zepfler, Louis 5.00 



[ 28 ] 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation: 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL 





SIXTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

For the Year 1942 



SIXTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 
1942 

INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 

Since l88l the Infants' Hospital has provided medical 
treatment for infants without regard to race, creed, 
color or residence. 

Our Research Studies and the training and experience 
given to Doctors, Medical Students and Nurses may 
some day SAVE THE BABY IN YOUR OWN HOME. 

WHAT YOUR DOLLARS GIVE 

Light, heat, food, nurses and doctors for one baby 

for . . . 



One day costs 


$4.00 


Seven days cost 


$28.00 


Twenty days cost 


$80.00 


One month costs 


$120.00 



$200 runs the whole hospital full of sick babies 

for one day. 

$6000 endows a memorial bed in perpetuity. 




[ 2 ] 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL DIRECTOR 



A~p\HE year 1942 presented many unusual situations in the Infants' 
A Hospital. The war made necessary numerous readjustments in per- 
sonnel and routines. It is likely that the difficulties which have arisen will 
not be less during the coming year. The spirit of cooperation has been 
heartening and resulted in making possible the continuation of the high 
quality of service given to the patients. Doctors, nurses, and all others 
working in the hospital have appreciated the necessity of assuming extra 
duties and responsibilities. The lure of service with the armed forces — 
either army or navy — and the feeling that in such service there is a more 
direct contribution to the war effort than remaining on the peace-time job 
has been hard to resist. Those who have carried on in the hospital deserve 
our appreciation and should feel that the care of the infants who will become 
the citizens of tomorrow is truly a war service and worthy of their best 
efforts. 

The hospital has been very busy, especially during recent months. The 
admissions have been for much the same conditions as in previous years. The 
use of chemotherapy — the sulfonamide drugs — has modified in a striking 
manner the treatment of many infectious conditions and greatly shortened 
the course and reduced the mortality in some of them. We no longer see a 
large number of infants ill with pneumonia lying under oxygen tents ; most 
of these patients respond promptly to the administration of one or the other 
of these newer drugs. The infants with meningitis also recover more quickly 
and completely than under earlier forms of therapy. They require only a 
few lumbar punctures for diagnosis and to determine the progress of the 
disease. Treatment by the spinal canal route has been abandoned, to the 
great benefit of the patients. 

The use of amino acids as a means of supplying protein to infants ill 
with certain conditions has been continued with gratifying results. What 
was formerly a method of trial has now become an established procedure. 
Dr. Shohl is extending our knowledge in this field and we look forward to 
the demonstration of additional situations in which amino acid therapy will 
be beneficial. The metabolism studies carried on in connection with this 
work constitute an important aspect of the hospital's service to the commu- 
nity and to medical science. 

This hospital, in common with all hospitals for infants, is presented 
with the problem of preventing cross-infections from patient to patient or 
from other personnel — doctors, nurses, students, employees — to patients. 
We have not escaped this year from such infections. As you are aware, 
studies have been made in previous years in an effort to control this menance 

[ 3 ] 



but thus far no completely effective procedures have been found. We have 
not abandoned our efforts to find a solution, and are keeping ourselves in- 
formed concerning the work of others elsewhere directed toward the same 
problem. 

The year now beginning may be even more difficult than the last in the 
matter of maintaining adequate personnel. We are confident, however, that 
the spirit of cooperative service which has been so evident in the past year 
will find a way to carry on. The nurse's aides and volunteer workers have 
been of great service. They are doing a really important work for the in- 
fants and the hospital. 

May I express my keen appreciation of the cordial relationship between 
the medical staff, the nursing staff, the administration, and all others work- 
ing in the hospital. The Infants' Hospital is a pleasant and friendly place 

in which to work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard M. Smith, M.D. 




fv 



[ 4 ] 




MEDICAL STATISTICS 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital 

December 31, 1941 43 

Number of patients admitted during the year 1942 671 

Number of patients discharged during the year 1942 677 

Number of patients remaining in the Hospital 

December 31, 1942 , 37 

714 714 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $28.00 to $37.50 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $28.00 118 

Number of patients — reduced rate per week — 75c to 

$28.00 539 

Number of patients — free 14 

Total number of Hospital days 14,474 

Average number of patients daily 39— f- 

Average days' stay 21 -j- 

DISCHARGED 

Relieved _ 479 

Unrelieved 49 

Transferred to other hospitals 42 

Discharged on parents' own responsibility or against advice 2 

Died 105 (14.7%) 



667 



34 died in a few hours 
19 died in less than 24 hours 
12 died in less than 48 hours 
61.0% died in less than 48 hours 



G. von L. Meyer, 

Director. 



[ 5 ] 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR 



THE first year of the war has caused a drastic change in every indi- 
vidual's mode of living, and these individuals found themselves deprived 
not only of many luxuries, but of many things which had for years been 
considered necessities in daily life. 

Infants' Hospital was no exception to this rule, and like all other 
hospitals it faced a program which was being modified to meet existing con- 
ditions resulting from reduction in personnel and other factors. 

The demands on the Hospital, however, remain unchanged for the birth 
rate in the community has not shown any signs of decreasing under the stress 
of war. 

Admissions were 671 (against 664 in 1941). Hospital days totalled 
14,474. The average census was 39, the same as the pre-war year. 

We welcomed in the middle of the year the appointment of Dr. Richard 
M. Smith as Chief of the Medical Service. Dr. Smith is Thomas Morgan 
Rotch Professor of Pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School succeeding to 
the chair formerly held by Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan from 1923 to 1941. 

We regretfully accepted Miss Harriet Russell's resignation as Super- 
visor in August, the position she had very ably filled for five years. 

Miss Mary G. Chapman was appointed to fill the vacanacy. 

In the face of adjustments that had to be met, and the difficulties that 
were encountered, the Medical and Nursing Staff of the Infants' Hospital 
deserve the gratitude and admiration of all concerned. It is with thanks to 
them and their unselfish devotion to the cause, that the Infants' Hospital can 
look back upon a year of accomplishment. 

G. v. L. Meyer, Director 



[ 6 ] 




II ' ... I I ■■ I ..' I 




[ 7 ] 



REPORT OF NURSING SERVICE 



DURING the year 1942, 38 student nurses from The Children's Hos- 
pital School of Nursing and approximately 240 students from schools 
which affiliate with us have received teaching in the care of infants at the 
Infants' Hospital. 

The illness record for the year is as follows : 

Average number of students off duty daily for illness 

or leave of absence following illness 96 

Total days of illness for graduate staff 25^2 

Total days of leave of absence following illness for 

graduate staff 6^2 

The war emergency is having its effect on the nursing service at Infants' 
Hospital as it has elsewhere. In some ways we are in a better position than 
many hospitals because of our increase in student nurses, both in our own 
school and in the affiliating group. However, more student nurses should 
mean more supervision, and while we are fortunate in having our supervisor 
and head nurses the changes and lack of auxiliary service such as ward 
helpers creates many problems. The amount of nursing care required has 
not been lessened by this emergency, but rather increased. We continuously 
have a large number of premature babies. 

We have combined certain of the work of the milk laboratory with 
that of the milk laboratory of Smith Ward of the Children's Hospital so 
that one person is in charge, and her salary is divided between the two hos- 
pitals. We have part-time service in the treatment room when available. 

Since the first class for Red Cross Nurse's Aides was completed at 
The Children's Hospital on November 27th, 1942, we have had some vol- 
unteer service at the Infants' Hospital. We appreciate it, and wish it were 
on a continuous basis rather than here and there as the volunteer may come. 

Mrs. Charles H. Lawrence, who is one of our older graduates, has 
been giving us a day of volunteer service for the past few months. A few of 
our graduates have come in for part-time work. 

The number of our general staff nurses is an uncertain quantity and 
varies from day to day. 

Miss Harriet Russell, who was supervisor for five years, resigned in 
August, and Miss Mary G. Chapman, who was formerly a head nurse on 
the service, and later night supervisor at the Children's Hospital, was ap- 
pointed. Miss Thelma Reynolds, who for a number of years was the head 
nurse on the upper ward, went with the Harvard Unit to Ireland, and Miss 
Hope Furgin was appointed. The changes in staff nurses are too numerous 
to mention. 

[ 8 ] 



On the closing day of the year the employed staff for the twenty-four 
hour service consists of : 

1 Supervisor 

2 Head nurses 

3 Staff nurses 

3 Ward helpers 

In addition we have a graduate in the milk laboratory who gives half- 
time to the Infants' Hospital. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stella Goostray, 



December 31, 1943. 



Superintendent of Nurses. 




[ 9 ] 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



THOUGH it seems a far cry from babies to soldiers, the war has taken 
Miss Emily Marsh who after two and one half years of doing the social 
work at the Infants' Hospital resigned in April to take a position with the 
Red Cross at the Lovell General Hospital at Fort Devens. In June Miss 
Kathleen Scott, a recent graduate from the Simmons College School of 
Social Work came to fill the vacancy, the work in the interval having been 
covered by the Director of Social Service. 

During the year a total of 109 babies came to the attention of the Social 
Service Department. The greatest number of referrals were for home in- 
vestigations to determine suitability for convalescent and permanent care 
upon discharge from the hospital. Sometimes a few changes in the physical 
environment of the home made the return of the baby possible, while in other 
instances arrangements for placement outside the home seemed indicated. 
For more complicated social and emotional problems longer and more in- 
tensive attention was necessary. Sometimes marital discord or strained 
family relationships were disrupting factors, so upsetting the mother that the 
baby's needs could not be adequately met. Often immature and unstable 
mothers needed help in accepting responsibility for their babies, over anxious 
mothers had to be reassured and new mothers taught and encouraged. For 
these two latter groups, the Community Health Association has been of in- 
estimable value in giving home supervision and instruction. 

We are still being called upon to deal with a range of social and emo- 
tional factors related to feeding problems, as described and emphasized in 
our reports of the last two years. Perhaps of equal frequency and intensity, 
are those situations in which parents need help in facing the tragic fact of a 
mentally defective child. If in addition permanent institutional care is 
recommended, the paucity of sufficient resources for the very young child 
makes placement extremely difficult. 

Of course the improvement in general economic conditions, has greatly 
decreased purely financial problems although the wages of most of our babies' 
fathers have not been strikingly high. Even in spite of better incomes, many 
families are still living in the same poor physical environment of depression 
days because better housing is not available. 

On the other hand new kinds of difficulties are being created by the 
war. During November and December, we have had several babies ready 
to go home to families who were without heat because of the oil shortage 
and these instances threaten to increase during the winter months of 1943. 
The enlistment of fathers in the Armed forces has created financial crises in 
some homes. The absence and danger of the father in other cases has created 

[ 10 ] 



emotional upsets and worry on the part of the mothers, tending to disturb 
home atmospheres and reflecting upon the security and care of children. The 
demands of industry are causing more mothers to be out of their homes all 
day at work, thus complicating the adequate care of little children, but more 
especially making the care of sick and convalescent babies more difficult to 
arrange. 

The meeting of such problems as have been presented in this report has 
required home visiting, contacts with parents and the integration of our 
work with appropriate social agencies in the community. In spite of gas and 
tire shortages and the complications of public transportation, a total of 103 
home visits have been made in the last six months. 

For several years a 100% contact has not been attempted by Social Ser- 
vice, but rather the doctors, nurses and community agencies have been the 
sources through which our cases have come. In order to see if this policy 
was a sound one, a simple study was made by the social worker during the 
month of November. She routinely reviewed the social situations of the 50 
patients admitted to the Infants' Hospital during that month and found 19 
babies which seemed to her to require some attention from our department, 
but of this group picked by her, 17 were referred to us anyway by the doctors 
and the mother of one referred herself. Therefore, only one case was picked 
up by the 100% contact which would not have come to us by our present 
method of selection. Recently several very suitable cases have been called to 
our attention through nurses and we should like to emphasize our interest 
in having more problems come to us from this course. 

The social worker makes ward rounds once a week and is at all times 
readily accessible to the medical and nursing staffs with whom we have had 
great pleasure in working. 

Marion W. Hall, 

Director of Social Service. 



[ ii i 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1943 



President 
ARTHUR G. ROTCH 

197 Commonwealth Avenue 

Secretary 
CHARLES M. ROTCH 

30 State Street 

Assistant Secretary 
HENRY W. PALMER, JR. 

Treasurer 
LINCOLN BAYLIES 

441 Stuart Street 

CHARLES M. ROTCH — Assistant Treasurer 



DIRECTORS 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Mrs. F. I. Amory 

Mrs. William Benjamin Bacon 

Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 

Lincoln Baylies 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Hasket Derby 

Charles Devens 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 

Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 

Marcien Jenckes 



Mrs. Alfred Kidder II 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George von L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
F. L. W. Richardson, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 
Dr. Richard M. Smith 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. S. D. Warren 
Henry K. White 



Lincoln Baylies 



Finance Committee 
Arthur G. Rotch 



Charles M. Rotch 



Hospital Director 
George von L. Meyer 



Physician in CJiief 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 



Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



CONSULTANTS 



Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
William H. Howell, M.D. 



Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. 
Fritz B. Talbot, M.D. 



[ 12 ] 



ACTIVE STAFF 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. — Physician-in-Chief 

Visiting Physicians 

Bronson Crothers, M.D. Charles A. Janeway, M.D. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. Clement A. Smith, M.D. 
Louis K. Diamond, M.D. (To April 27, 1943) 

James L. Gamble, M.D. Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 

*Lewis W. Hill, M.D. Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Physicians 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. Henry E. Gallup, M.D. 

Stewart H. Clifford, M.D. *Charles D. May, M.D. 

*R. Cannon Eley, M.D. Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 

Alfred T. Shohl, M.D. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 
William E. Ladd, M.D. — Surgeon-in-Chief 

Visiting Surgeons 
*Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 

Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. (Neurosurgery) 
*Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. (Otolaryngology) 

Associate Visiting Surgeons Assistant Surgeon 

George D. Cutler, M.D. *John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 

Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 

Robert E. Gross, M.D. Visiting Otolaryngologist 

Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 
Associate Surgeons 

*Henry W. Hudson M.D. Associate Visiting Otolaryngologists 

*Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. *Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

*Augustus Thorndike, M.D. Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

Research Associate in Otolaryngology 
*Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. — Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 

Orthopedic Surgeon Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons 

James W. Sever, M.D. A. H. Brewster, M.D. 

William T. Green, M.D. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. — Pathologist-in-Chief 

Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Director, Chemistry Laboratory Bacteriologist 

James L. Gamble, M.D. John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Roentgenologist — Edward B. D. Neuhauser, M.D. 
Dermatologist — E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 
Ophthalmologist — J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 
Stomatologist — Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 
Social Service — Miss Marion Hall 



On leave of absence with the U. S. Armed Forces. 

[ 13 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE OFFICERS FOR 1943 



Chairman 
MRS. WILLIAM BENJAMIN BACON 

Vice-Chairman 
MRS. GEORGE BATY BLAKE 

Second Vice-Chairman 
MRS. JOHN A. V. DAVIES 

Third Vice-Chairman 
MISS IDA C. SMITH 

Secretary 
MRS. FREDERIC B. KELLOGG 

Assistant Secretary 
MISS LAWRENCE L. REEVE 

Treasurer 
MRS. FRANKLIN KING 

War Service Committee 

A joint Committee of members of the Welfare Committee of The Children's Hospital, 
and the Ladies' Aid Committee headed by Mrs. Bartlett Harwood, a Manager 
of The Children's Hospital.) 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE FINANCIAL REPORT 

MRS. FRANKLIN KING, Treasurer 
January 1st, 1942 — January 1st, 1943 

RECEIPTS 

Balance January 1st, 1942 $ 442.55 

Dues 825.00 

Donations _ 220.00 

Raffle of bicycle" ., 487.50 

$1,975.05 

PAYMENTS 

Bed in memory of Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan $ 600.00 

Materials and supplies for Hospital _ 489.10 

Postage and printing 45.9 1 

Welfare Committee share in tea 1.80 

Sofa 125.00 

Bank service charges _ 2.90 

$1,264.71 

Balance January 1st, 1943 710.34 

$1,975.05 

[ 14 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE — ANNUAL REPORT 



THE Ladies' Aid Committee has met regularly throughout the year. 
There have been a few resignations and several new members have 
been elected. 

Again this year no entertainment was undertaken, but the request for 
over subscription of dues was so successful that the Committee was able to 
endow a bed in memory of Dr. Blackfan. 

In line with the Committee's interest in the appearance of the hospital, 
they this year put a new chair and sofa in the Mothers' Room. 

The project of a store has been given up, but the Committee is cooperat- 
ing with the War Service Committee of The Children's Hospital, and 18 
members are workers. 

Since the war has affected supplies for the teas, they were given up after 
May 19th except for a very successful Christmas tea, held on December 15th. 

The war has forced several of the officers to resign, but since Mrs. King 
remains as Treasurer, the substitute officers are learning from her. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sarita B. Kellogg, 

Acting Secretary. 




[ 15 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 

Mrs. Timothee Adamowski 

Mrs. Charles F. Adams, Jr. 

Mrs. David Ames 

Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Miss Olivia Ames 

Mrs. Francis I. Amory 

Mrs. J. Austin Amory 

Mrs. Roger Amory 

Mrs. William Benjamin Bacon 

Mrs. Talbot Baker 

Mrs. James O. Bangs 

Miss Julia A. Barbour 

Mrs. B. Devereaux Barker 

Mrs. J. L. P. Barker, Jr. 

Mrs. William DeFord Beal 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Mrs. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. George Baty Blake 

Mrs. John Blanchard, 2nd 

Mrs. Thomas S. Blumer 

Mrs. Cameron Bradley 

***Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley 

Mrs. John F. Bradley 

Miss Barbara Bremer 

Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 

Miss Elsie C. Brewer 

Mrs. Davenport Brown 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 

Mrs. Edmund J. Burke 

Mrs. Frederic M. Burnham 

Miss Nina Burnham 

Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 

Mrs. Samuel Cabot 

Miss Andree Cassels 

Mrs. William Caswell 

Mrs. Ephron Catlin 

Mrs. Charles E. Channing 

Mrs. Theodore Chase 

Mrs. Joseph Choate, III 

Mrs. Frederic C. Church 

Mrs. Forrester A. Clark 

Mrs. Henry C. Clark 

Miss Margaret Clark 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Clark 

Mrs. Robert F. Clark 

Mrs. Robert J. Clark 

Mrs. Eliot Codman 

Mrs. Sargent F. Collier 

Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 

Mrs. T. Jefferson Coolidge, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick G. Crocker 

Mrs. Taylor Crowninshield 

Mrs. Charles C. Cunningham 

Mrs. Edward Cunningham, Jr. 

Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Mrs. Richard Danielson 

Mrs. John A. V. Davies 

Mrs. Frederick M. Dearborn, Jr. 



Mrs. Charles Devens 
Mrs. J. Lindsay Dexter 
Mrs. William Dexter 
Mrs. Frederick W. Eaton 
Mrs. Samuel Eliot 
Mrs. Robert W. Emmons, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert Faxon 
Mrs. William S. Febiger 
Mrs. John Flint 
Mrs. Lawrence Foster 
Miss Eleanor Frothingham 
Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 
Mrs. Marshall Fulton 
Mrs. John D. Gannett 
Mrs. George P. Gardner, Jr. 
Mrs. Harrison Gardner 
Mrs. Wallace Goodrich 
Mrs. Francis C. Gray 
Mrs. Henry V. Greenough 
Mrs. James C. Greenway, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry S. Grew 
Mrs. Brinley M. Hall 
Mrs. John L. Hall 
Mrs. John M. Hall 
Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 
Mrs. Paul Hameln 
Mrs. Huntington R. Hardwick 
***Mrs. Charles Harrington 
Mrs. Richard Harte 
Mrs. Andrew H. Hepburn 
Mrs. Robert F. Herrick, Jr. 
Mrs. Christian A. Herter 
Mrs. Amor Hollingsworth, Jr. 
Mrs. Chandler Hovey, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 
Mrs. James M. Hunnewell 
Mrs. Benjamin Huntington 
Mrs. G. Newell Hurd 
Mrs. Mark Jouett 
Mrs. Edmund S. Kelley, Jr. 
Mrs. Frederic B. Kellogg 
Mrs. William Kemble 
Mrs. Alfred Kidder, 2nd 
Mrs. Franklin King 
Mrs. Gelston T. King 
Mrs. Alexander H. Ladd, Jr. 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Mrs. Gardiner M. Lane 
Mrs. Howard Lapsley 
Mrs. John E. Lawrence 
Miss Luisita A. Leland 
Mrs. Charles E. Mason, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry Mason, Jr. 
Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 
Mrs. James Means 
Mrs. Houghton Metcalf 
Mrs. Charles Meyer 
Mrs. Charles G. Mixter, Jr. 
Mrs. Sherman Morss 
Mrs. J. Lothrop Motley 



[ 16 ] 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Hamilton Osgood 
Mrs. Franklin H. Palmer 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Augustin H. Parker, Jr. 
Mrs. Francis S. Parker 
Mrs. William A. Parker 
Mrs. Thomas N. Perkins, Jr. 
Mrs. Marc Peter, Jr. 
Mrs. Andrew J. Peters 
Mrs. Carleton Pike 
Mrs. Arnold Porter 
Mrs. Brooks Potter 
Mrs. George Putnam 
Mrs. Winthrop Pyemont 
Mrs. Eugene Record 
Mrs. Lawrence Reeve 
***Mrs. Charles F. Richardson 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Mrs. Joseph P. Richardson 
Mrs. Sherwood Rollins 
Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 
***Mrs. William E. Russell 
Mrs. Renouf Russell 
Mrs. Henry B. Sawyer 
Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 
Mrs. Philip S. Sears 
Mrs. Richard D. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Louis A. Shaw 
Mrs. S. Parkman Shaw 
Mrs. F. Foster Sherburne 
Mrs. J. Henry Sleeper 
Mrs. Stephen W. Sleeper 
***Miss Ida C. Smith 



Mrs. Richard M. Smith 

Mrs. William S. Spaulding 

Miss Faith Stanwood 

Mrs. Malcolm C. Stewart 

Mrs. Philip Stockton 

Mrs. R. C. Storey 

Mrs. Richard C. Storey, Jr. 

Mrs. George H. Swift 

Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 

Mrs. Nathan Talbot 

Mrs. Thomas C. Thacher, Jr. 

Mrs. Warren Thayer 

Mrs. John A. Tuckerman 

Mrs. Sears Tuckerman 

Mrs. F. Skiddy von Stade, Jr. 

Mrs. Bayard Warren 

Miss Camilla Warren 

***Mrs. George E. Warren 

Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 

Mrs. Donald C. Watson 

Mrs. Charles Weed 

Mrs. George S. Weld 

Mrs. Philip S. Weld 

Miss Mary West 

Mrs. Howard Whiteside 

Mrs. Edward A. Whitney 

Mrs. Norton Wigglesworth 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Winthrop 

Mrs. Roger Wolcott 

Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr. 



*** Honorary Members 




[ 17 ] 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



LINCOLN BAYLIES, TREASURER 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1942 



ASSETS 

Cash - $ 8,877.05 

Investments: 

General Fund $419,485.3 1 

Permanent Fund 271,524.30 

691,009.61 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr., Memorial Hospital 

and Equipment 145,45 1.40 



TOTAL ASSETS $845,338.06 

LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Children's Hospital — Current Account $ 11,701.80 

General Fund 407,932.32 

Beverly Farms (Massachusetts) Real Estate Fund 3,958.49 

Hospital and Equipment Fund _ 145,451.40 

Permanent Fund - 276,294.05 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUNDS $845,338.06 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1942 

RECEIPTS 

Income from Investments _ $ 32,924.59 

Donations: 

Greater Boston Community Fund _ $ 23,220.00 

Permanent Charity Fund 2,000.00 

Direct Donations for General Purposes 530.00 

Eugene Fay Trust Fund 100.00 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund _ 100.00 

Charles A. Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

26,000.00 

Income — Children's Hospital „ 23,183.78 

Miscellaneous Income — — 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $ 82,108.37 

[ 18 ] 



PAYMENTS 



Expense — Children's Hospital $ 86,873.00 

Salaries .. 1,182.00 

Publicity and Advertising „ „ 438.41 

Audit of Children's Hospital 200.00 

Insurance _ — 

Rent and Light 180.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 272.39 

Office Supplies and Expenses 36.10 



TOTAL PAYMENTS $ 89,181.90 

Excess of Payments over Receipts for year ending 

December 31, 1942 $ 7,073.53 



CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 

To the Officers and Trustees of the Infants' Hospital: 

We have made an examination of the financial books and records of the 
Infants' Hospital for the year ended December 31, 1942. 

We satisfied ourselves that all recorded cash receipts were deposited in 
the bank, and we examined cancelled checks for all disbursements. We veri- 
fied the balance of cash in bank by a certificate from the depository. 

On April 20, 1943, we inspected the securities held in the General and 
Restricted Funds and examined brokers invoices in support of all changes in 
the list between December 31, 1942, and the date of our count. 

In our opinion, based on such examination and subject to the qualifica- 
tion that securities are shown at book values, the accompanying statement of 
assets and liabilities and of income and expense present fairly the financial 
condition of the Hospital at December 31, 1942, and the results of its opera- 
tions for the year then ended. 

Charles F. Rittenhouse & Company 
Certified Public Accountants 

Boston, Massachusetts 
May 19, 1943 



[ 19 ] 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE GENERAL FUND 

December 31, 1942 



BONDS Due 

Arkansas Power and Light Company 1956 

Boston & Maine Railroad — 1st Mortgage 1960 

Boston & Maine Railroad — 1st Mortgage 1955 

Boston & Maine Railroad — Income Bonds 1970 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 1971 

Columbia Gas & Electric Corporation 1961 

Consolidation Coal Company „ 1960 

Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railroad 1962 

Government of Dominion of Canada 1952 

Illinois Power & Light Corporation 1956 

International Paper Company 1955 

Maine Central Railroad 1945 

New York Central Railroad Company 1946 

New York Steam 1963 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 1970 

Potomac Edison Company 1961 

Puget Sound Power & Light 1949 

Puget Sound Power & Light 1950 

Safe Harbor Water Power Company 1979 

Saguenay Power Company, Ltd 1966 

Shawinigan Water & Power Company 1967 

Southern Railway Company 1956 

Toledo, St. Louis & Western Railroad 1950 

L T nion Electric of Missouri 1971 

United Stock Yards Corporation 1951 

Virginia Public Service Co. 1st Mortgage 1972 

Western Maryland Railway 1977 

Total Bonds 

No. of 

STOCKS Shares 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co 117 

Dayton Power & Light 4-]/ 2 % Pfd 50 

Draper Corporation 875 

E. I. DuPont de Nemours 35 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Assoc. 67c Pfd 200 

First National Bank of Boston 125 

General Electric Company 800 

General Motors Corp. 5% Pfd 100 

Nashua Manufacturing Co. — 1st Pfd 100 

Nashua Manufacturing Co. — 2nd Pfd 100 

Pacific Gas and Electric 200 

Phillips Petroleum :. 125 

Phoenix Insurance Company 60 

Public Service Co. of Colorado 77c 50 

Saco-Lowell Shops, Common 150 

Saco-Lowell Shops, Pfd 150 

Southern Pacific Railroad, Common 100 

Standard Oil of New Jersev 125 

Union Pacific Railroad, Pfd 100 

United Fruit Company 100 

United States Steel Company 100 

Western Penn. Power ^/ 2 7c Pfd 50 

Total Stocks 

Total General Fund Investments 





Par 


Book 


'late 


Value 


Value 


5 


$10,000.00 


$ 9,575.00 


4 


3,200.00 


3,200.00 


3 


5,000.00 


4,625.00 


4/ 2 


8,000.00 


7,505.00 


:> 


10,000.00 


8,650.00 


3 


5,000.00 


5,219.62 


5 


4,000.00 


1,000.00 


3/2 


10,000.00 


9,800.00 


5 


10,000.00 


9,950.00 


5 


6,000.00 


6,255.00 


6 


9,000.00 


8,967.73 


4 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


m 


10,000.00 


9,800.00 


3/ 2 


5,000.00 


5,362.50 


33/i 


5,000.00 


4,900.00 


4/2 


10,000.00 


9,950.00 


5/2 


5,000.00 


5,082.12 


4/ 2 


5,000.00 


4,925.00 


4/ 2 


10,000.00 


9,691.25 


4% 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


4/ 2 


10,000.00 


6,196.95 


6 


10,000.00 


9,650.00 


4 


10,000.00 


8,600.00 


33/ 8 


5,000.00 


5,550.00 


4Zt 


10,000.00 


9,800.00 


334 


10,000.00 


10,400.00 


5/2 


5,000.00 


4,987.50 




$205,200.00 


$194,642.67 



$ 21,692.27 
5,450.00 

47,673.75 
5,285.00 

18,600.00 
5,703.13 

29,600.00 

12,025.26 
6,000.00 
4,100.00 
5,075.00 
5,711.15 
5,580.00 
5,550.00 
1,000.00 
4,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,411.88 
8,002.50 
8,020.20 

10,000.00 
5,362.50 

$224,842.64 

$419,485.31 



[ 20 ] 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE PERMANENT FUND 



December 31, 1942 



BONDS Due Rate 

Central Pacific Railway Company 1949 4 

Central of Georgia Railway Company 1959 5 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. 111. Div.... 1949 4 

Chicago, Western Indiana R. R 1952 4 

Eastern Gas k Fuel Associates 1956 4 

Florida Power & Light Company 1954 5 

Great Northern Railway Company 1973 5 

Illinois Power & Light Corporation 1953 6 

Kentucky Utilities 1970 4 

Lawyers Mortgage Investment Trust, Series 1 1945 

Lexington & Eastern Railroad 1965 5 

Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company 2003 4^4 

Minnesota Pow r er & Light Company 1978 4^2 

Monongahela Railway Company 1966 3 T /i 

Montana Power Company 1966 3^4 

New England Power Association 1954 5^2 

New York Central & Hudson River 

Railroad Company 1998 3 J / 2 

New York Central & Hudson River 

Railroad Company 1997 3^4 

New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad 1978 4^4 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad... 1948 6 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad... 1947 4 

Northern States Power Company 1967 3^4 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 1970 3^4 

Texas & Pacific Railway Company 1977 5 

United Drug Company Bonds 1953 5 

U. S. Treasury Series G 1954 2^4 

Wabash R. R. Company 1991 4^ 

Total Bonds 



Par 


Book 


Value 


Value 


$ 5,000.00 


$ 5,012.50 


10,000.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


4,750.78 


10,000.00 


9,675.00 


10,000.00 


9,650.00 


10,000.00 


9,525.00 


10,000.00 


9,250.00 


9,000.00 


8,865.00 


10,000.00 


10,450.00 


7,267.50 


1,267.50 


3,000.00 


2,977.50 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


8,000.00 


8,321.23 


10,000.00 


10,250.00 


10,000.00 


9,491.35 


10,000.00 


9,500.00 


5,000.00 


4,800.00 


5,000.00 


4,400.00 


8,000.00 


5,070.00 


2,500.00 


2,462.74 


6,000.00 


6,480.00 


10,000.00 


9,537.50 


5,000.00 


4,900.00 


5,000.00 


3,500.00 


20,000.00 


18,910.83 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


1,800.00 


540.00 


$205,567.50 


$184,586.93 



No. of 

STOCKS Shares 

Allied Chemical and Dye 35 

Aluminum Company of America, Pfd 100 

Boston and Albany Railroad Company 15 

Boston Edison Company 400 

Duquesne Light Company, Pfd 100 

Kennecott Copper Company 150 

Liggett and Myers 60 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co 25 

Pennsylvania Railroad 200 

Puget Sound Traction Light & Power, Pfd 25 

Quincy Market Cold Storage Co., Pfd 16 

Standard Oil Company of Ohio, Pfd 100 

Union Pacific Railroad Co., Common 25 

Wabash Railroad Company 45 

Total Stocks 

Total Permanent Fund Investments 



$ 5,683.13 

10,712.50 
3,070.00 

15,981.95 
9,750.00 
5,590.20 
5,280.00 
2,398.34 

10,000.00 
2,581.25 
1,600.00 

10,300.00 

3,000.00 

990.00 

$ 86,937.37 

$271,524.30 



[ 21 ] 



MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



Allen, Mrs. Thomas 

Ames, Mrs. John S., Jr. 

Amory, Mrs. F. I. 

Anderson, Mrs. Larz 

Bacon, Mrs. William Benjamin 



Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 
Bartlett, Nelson S., Jr. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Nelson S., Jr. 
Baylies, Lincoln 
Beale, Arthur M. 
Bell, Mrs. Stoughton 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward L. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A. 
Bradley, Mrs. J. Gardner 
Bremer, Mrs. Theodore G. 
Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 



Jackson, Mrs. James 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Jr. 
Jenckes, Marcien 

Kaufmann, Mrs. Carl F. 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred II 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M. 

Ladd, Mrs. William E. 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Liggett, Louis K. 
Lovett, Mrs. R. W. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B. 
Meyer, George von L. 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble 
Nickerson, Mrs. Roland W. 



Cave, Mrs. Edwin F. 
Chapin, Mrs. John R. 
Clark, Mrs. R. F. 
Clark, Mrs. R. J. 
Converse, Miss E. N. 
Crowninshield, Mrs. F. B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Allen 
Curtis, Mrs. E. R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 



Dane, Mrs. Ernest B., Jr. 
DeForde, Miss Alice 
Derby, Hasket 
Devens, Charles 
Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 



Ely, Mrs. P. V. R. 
Forbes, F. Murray 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 



Hall, Mrs. John L. 
Hall, John M. 
Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Hamlen, Mrs. P. M. 
Harrington, Mrs. Charles 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. 
Homans, Mrs. John 
Hovey, Mrs. Charles F. 
Howes, Mrs. Osborne 
hunnewell, f. w. 



Iasigi, Mrs. Mary V. 
Ide, Miss E. K. 



O'Connell, P. A. 

Palmer, Mrs. Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W. 
Palmer, Mrs. Henry W., Jr. 
Palmer, Henry W., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. F. S. 

Richardson, F. L. W., Jr. 
Richardson, Mrs. Homer B. 
Rotch, Arthur G. 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Rotch, Charles M. 

Sargent, Mrs. S. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Henry R. 
Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. 
Sears, Mrs. Philip S. 
Seymour, Robert W. 
Shaw, S. Parkman, Jr. 
Sheafe, Mrs. William 
Simmons, Mrs. G. W. 
Smith, Dr. Richard M. 
Stillman, Mrs. Carl S. 
Stockton, Mrs. Philip 

Talbot, Mrs. Fritz B. 
Tarbell, Mrs. John F. 
Thacker, Mrs. T. C. 
Tower, Miss E. M. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry 



Warren, Mrs. Fiske 
Warren, Mrs. S. D. 
Webster, Edwin S. 
Windeler, Mrs. G. H. 



[ 22 ] 



1942 CONTRIBUTORS 



Anonymous Contributors (97) $7,195.00 

Adams, Miss Ethelind 25.00 

Agoos, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon 75.00 

Alcaide, Mr. and Mrs. A. S 10.00 

Aldrich, William T 40.00 

Aldrich, Mrs. William T 50.00 

Ames, Mrs. John S., Jr 300.00 

Amory, Mr. and Mrs. Francis I.... 50.00 

Aver, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F 160.00 

Bacon, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 

Edward 10.00 

Baer, Mrs. Louis 10.00 

Barbour, Miss Julia A 10.00 

Barlow, Miss Mary L 20.00 

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. Joel M 5.00 

Bartlett, Nelson S., Jr 25.00 

Bartol, Dr. and Mrs. John W 10.00 

Bartol, Louis C 10.00 

Baxter, Mrs. Gregory Paul 18.00 

Beal, Miss Edith L 5.00 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P 250.00 

Beggs, Flora Nichols 5.00 

Bell, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 10.00 

Boit, Dalton & Church Employees 1.00 
Boston Insurance Company Em- 
ployees 2.00 

Bowden, Mrs. Herbert L 20.00 

Brandegee, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 

D 35.00 

Bremer, Miss Barbara 25.00 

Bremer, Miss Sarah F 25.00 

Brown, Mrs. Edwin P 25.00 

Burgess, Mrs. Theodore P 10.00 

Burke, Mrs. Edmund J 10.00 

Campbell, Walter M 5.00 

Carter, John & Co., Inc 5.00 

Century Indemnity Co. Employees 1.00 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B 10.00 

Chase, Miss Alice P „ 15.00 

Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Talbot C 20.00 

Chase, Mrs. Theodore 25.00 

Children's Hospital Employees 174.00 

Clapp, Misses Elizabeth and Mary 

C 1.00 

Clark, Dr. and Mrs. George 10.00 

Clark, Miss Katherine F 2.00 

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel T. 50.00 

Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Philip M.... 25.00 

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J „.. 25.00 

Colby Memorial Trust 25.00 

Committee of the Permanent 

Charity Fund 2,000.00 

Corkery, Margaret M 2.50 

Countway, Francis A 100.00 

Creighton, Mr. and Mrs. A. M 10.00 

Crowninshield, Mr. and Mrs. 

Francis B 200.00 

Curtis, Albert H 10.00 

Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 25.00 



Curtis, Mrs. Louis, Sr 25.00 

Cutler, Mr. and Mrs. Roger W 150.00 

Dalton, Henry R 50.00 

Davenport, Mrs. George H, 35.00 

Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

Desmond, Arthur W 5.00 

Devens, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 60.00 

Eaton, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. 25.00 

Eley, Dr. R. Cannon 12.50 

Elliot, Mr. and Mrs. John M 25.00 

Emery, Mrs. Forrest 5.00 

Emmons, Mrs. R. W 10.00 

Emmons, Robert W 50.00 

Evans, Mrs. David J 5.00 

Endicott, Mr. and Mrs. H. 

Wendell 200.00 

Endicott, Miss Katherine 100.00 

Falvey, Mrs. Donald 25.00 

Fay, Eugene F. Estate 200.00 

Federal Employees Group „ 4.50 

"William Jay Fegan Day" 200.00 

Ferguson, Mrs. Bennett S 100.00 

Fessenden, Mr. and Mrs. Sewall H. 200.00 

Fielding, Louise 15.00 

First National Bank of Boston 

Employees 5.00 

Folsom, Grenville W 10.00 

Forbes, Dr. and Mrs. Alexander 25.00 

Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. 5.00 

Foster, Mrs. Alfred D „ 5.00 

Foster, Miss Hilda S „ 10.00 

Fish, Miss Margaret A 5.00 

Flagg, Dr. and Mrs. Elisha 20.00 

Frost, Mr. Donald Kav 50.00 

Frost, Mrs. Rufus H 2.00 

Frothingham, Miss E. B 10.00 

Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 5.00 

Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A 50.00 

Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. Alvan T 100.00 

Gardner, Mrs. George P 200.00 

Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. Philip 10.00 

Gerry, Mrs. E. Peabody 5.00 

Gray, Mrs. Reginald 25.00 

Gray, Reginald 10.00 

Grew, Mr. and Mrs. Henry S 50.00 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund 100.00 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John L 100.00 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John M 75.00 

Halsey, Mrs. Martha Fuller 10.00 

Hanington, Miss Elizabeth F 5.00 

Hasenfus, Nathaniel J 5.00 

Heard, Mrs. John 5.00 

Herman, Mrs. Joseph M 15.00 

Herter, Mr. and Mrs. Christian A. 50.00 

Hoag, Mrs. Charles R 25.00 

Hood, H. P. & Sons Employees 10.00 

Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. 10.00 



[ 23 ] 



Howe, James C 50.00 

Hopkins, Miss Emma A 5.00 

Houghton, Mrs. Clement S 50.00 

Hutchins, Mrs. Edward W 5.00 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 10.00 

Jenkins Brothers 2.00 

Jordan, Mrs. Robert 150.00 

Kellev, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund 15.00 

Kemble, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. T 25.00 

Kimball, Mrs. Benjamin P 15.00 

King, Mrs. Gelston T 200.00 

King, Mr. and Mrs. Henry P 50.00 

Klopot, A 15.00 

Ladd, Dr. and Mrs. William E 100.00 

Lane, Mrs. Gardiner M 25.00 

Lee, Mr. and Mrs. John C 10.00 

Leland, Miss Elizabeth C 5.00 

Lever Brothers Company 500.00 

Leveroni, Judge Frank 25.00 

Levi, Miss Elizabeth F 5.00 

Long, H. V 5.00 

Loring, Miss Marjorie C 25.00 

Lvman, Henrv 25.00 

Lyman, Theodore 100.00 

Mahady, E. F. Company 10.00 

Manson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Edgar... 5.00 

Mason, Mrs. Austin B 20.00 

Means, Mrs. James B 20.00 

Meigs, Mrs. M. S 2.50 

Meredith & Grey Inc. Employees... 10.00 

Merrill, Mrs. Luther M 10.00 

Mitchell, Miss Lillian 25.00 

Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Edward C... 5.00 

Moors, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W.... 25.00 

Morse, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H 5.00 

Moseley, Mrs. F. S 200.00 

Motley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lothrop... 15.00 

N. E. Mutual Life Insurance 

Employees 8.00 

N. E. Power Ass'n & Affiliated Co. 

Employees 5.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Employees 2.98 

Newman, Mrs. Samuel J 10.00 

Orlandini, Mrs. Vittorio 5.00 

Page, Mrs. E. B 20.00 

Parker, Augustin H 15.00 

Parker, Mrs. Augustin H. Jr 25.00 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. William 

Amorv 100.00 

Parks, Mrs. William A 25.00 

Peavv, Mrs. Leopold 5.00 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T 10.00 

Phelan, Mrs. James J 25.00 

Pickering, Miss Minnie M 5.00 

Pickman, Mr. and Mrs. Dudley L. 20.00 

Pokat Printing Company 5.00 

Rantoul, Mrs. Neal 100.00 

Reed, Miss Emilv S 15.00 

Reed, Miss Ida B 15.00 

Rice, Harry L 15.00 



Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles F 10.00 

Richardson, Mrs. John 5.00 

Richardson, William K 25.00 

Riley, Miss Mabel Louise 75.00 

Ripley, Alfred L 50.00 

Robinson, Edward P 5.00 

Rothwell, Mr. and Mrs. 

James Mason 10.00 

Rowley, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. 50.00 

Rowley, Dr. Francis H 10.00 

Sanderson, E. L 5.00 

Sayles, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W.... 5.00 

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R 15.00 

Sears, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick R. 100.00 

Sears, Mr. and Mrs. Francis P 25.00 

Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. S. P., Jr 25.00 

Shepard, Miss Emily B 10.00 

Sias, Mrs. Charles D 50.00 

Slattery, E. T. Company 100.00 

Smith, Mrs. Charles L....".. 10.00 

Smith, Miss Ida C 15.00 

Sortwell, Mrs. A. F 10.00 

Sortwell, Mrs. A. F. Sr 10.00 

Spaulding, Mr. and Mrs. John T. 25.00 

Spaulding, Mrs. William S 25.00 

Stackpole, Miss Alice 5.00 

Stackpole, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis 10.00 

Staniford, Mrs. Daniel 10.00 

State Employe Group 275.00 

Steinert, Mrs. Alexander 5.00 

Stevens, Moses T 25.00 

Sullivan, Miss Mary G 10.00 

Sun Oil Company Employees 5.00 

Swift, Mr. and Mrs. George H 100.00 

Thayer, Mrs. Warren 10.00 

Thomas, Miss Helen 25.00 

Thorp, Miss Alice A 10.00 

Travelli, Charles Irwin Fund 100.00 

Vaughan, Miss Bertha H 25.00 

Vaughn, Walter J 5.00 

Veazie, Miss Mary L 5.00 

Vincent, Dr. Beth 25.00 

Wardwell, Mr. and Mrs. 

Sheldon E 25.00 

Warren, Mrs. George E 100.00 

Warren, Mrs. Samuel D 100.00 

Watters, Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. 10.00 

Weld, Mrs. Rudolph 10.00 

Wheeler Reflector Co. and 

Employees 50.00 

Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. Wm., Jr. 50.00 

Whitney, Reverend Arthur B 5.00 

Williams, Roger 25.00 

White, Mr. and Mrs. Henry K 50.00 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B...... 50.00 

Winthrop, Miss Katherine 100.00 

Wolcott, Mr. and Mrs. 

S. Huntington 25.00 

Wyzanski, M. E. and C. E 25.00 

Young, B. Loring 10.00 



[ 24 ] 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation: 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL 




SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 
For the Year 1943 



SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

i 943 

INFANT'S HOSPITAL 

300 LONG WOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 

Since 1881 the I nj ants' Hospital has provided medical 
treatment for infants without regard to race, creed, 
color or residence. 

Our Research Studies and the training and experience 
given to Doctors, Medical Students and Nurses may 
some day save the baby in your own home. 

WHAT YOUR DOLLARS GIVE 

Light, heat, food, nurses and doctors for one baby 

for . . . 



One day costs 


#7.00 


Seven days cost 


#49.00 


One month costs 


#210.00 



#6000 endows a memorial bed in perpetuity. 




{2 } 



REPORT OF THE PHYSICIAN-IN-CHIEF 



WORK in the Infants' Hospital went forward during the year 
1943 along much the same lines as in the past. Despite the 
many difficulties incident to the emergency, the smooth running of 
routine has been maintained with remarkable efficiency. The spirit 
of co-operative effoit is manifest in all the activities on the wards 
and is a vivid testimony to the character of the personnel. As has 
been demonstrated in the theater of war, the most important factor 
in the accomplishment of results when many persons of divergent back- 
ground and training are concerned is the quality of leadership. We 
are fortunate in having Miss Chapman as our Supervisor. At all 
times she has manifested a calm efficiency and directed the multiple 
activities of the Hospital in a way to win the confidence and respect 
of all the people with whom she comes in contact. 

The quantity of work has been greater than in any previous year. 
The usual number of admissions has been about 60 a month, but 
since April, there have been 80 or more a month. Treatments have 
been doubled over the number given in previous years. At times 
this additional work has been carried on with decreased personnel, - 
and with many and frequent changes in those who were available. 
There has been considerable illness among doctors and nurses making 
extra work for those remaining on duty. 

Beginning January 1, 1944 we have been able to assign three 
internes tc the Infants' Wards and to remove the care of the premature 
infants from the responsibility of these internes so that we hope in 
the future to have less difficulty with Medical Service. The shortage 
of nurses still confronts all hospitals. The volunteer assistance given 
by nurses' aides and by former nurse graduates has been of inestim- 
able help in meeting this situation. Miss Goostray deserves our sin- 
cere appreciation for the way in which she has met these difficult 
problems. 

One change of major importance has been instituted. The pre- 
mature infant care has been made a separate medics 1 seivice, with a 
different visiting physician and interne from those in the rest of the 
Hospital. This accomplishes two things, -- it relieves the regular 
service from some work and responsibility and it reduces the chances 
of introducing infection into the premature nursdy since it has its 
own independent perscnnel. Dr. Stewart H. Clifford is in direct 

'{S } 



charge of the premature service. The interne assigned to the pre- 
mature nursery is at the same time the pediatric interne at the Boston 
Lying-in Hospital so that his whole interest is concentrated upon the 
problem of premature and newborn infants. The care of premature 
infants has been improved further by the acquisition of a new Hess bed. 

In the past we have not had adequate facilities for the care of 
infants needing to be in an atmosphere of high humidity. Treatment 
under such modified conditions is an essential procedure in some acute 
infections of the throat and chest. Two rooms are being constructed 
which will be ideal for this purpose and should be in operation soon. 

The Director of the Hospital, reflecting the attitude of the 
Board of Managers, as well as his own, has been most sympathetic to 
all requests and helpful at all times. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard M. Smith, M.D., 

Physician-in-Chief 



44 > 




MEDICAL STATISTICS 

Number of patients remaining in the hospital 

December 31, 1942 ". -. 37 

Number of patients admitted during the year 1943 . . 869 

Number of patients discharged during the year 1943. 870 

Number of patients remaining in the hospital 

December 31, 1943 36 



906 906 

Number of patients— weekly rate— $28.00 to $37.50 . 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $28.00 355 

Number of patients — reduced rate per week — 75c to 

$28.00 502 

Number of patients — free . . . 12 

Total number of hospital days 13,859 

Average number of patients daily 37 

Average days' stay 15 

DISCHARGED 

Relieved 637 

Unrelieved 30 

Transferred to other hospitals 35 

Discharged on parents' own responsibility or against 

advice 3 

Died 165 (18.2%) 

Total 870 

38 died in a few hours 

20 died in less than 24 hours 

22 died in less than 48 hours 

48.4% died in less than 48 hours 

G. v. L. Meyer, 

Director. 
4'5 > 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 



HHIS has been a very busy year for the Infants' Hospital. The 
-*- report of the Physician-in-Chief will elaborate on this subject, 
but it is my pleasure to congratulate the Staff and personnel for their 
accomplishments in the face of the present wartime difficulties. 

The Board of Trustees of The Children's Hospital has voted 
to go ahead with plans for a new building to replace the pavilion 
wards. Committees are hard at work in order that, and in hopes that, 
plans and specifications will be completed and construction may start 
as soon as conditions are opportune. 

It is anybody's guess as to when the war will be over, but 1943 
saw the turn of the tide and put the Allies on an offensive basis, which 
assures ultimate success. 

The new hospital, as now contemplated, calls for a building lo- 
cated in the middle of the grounds, and which will rise 14 stories. Each 
typical floor above the laboratories, z-ray and operating rooms will 
consist of two units of 24 beds each. The building will be so con- 
structed that in the future wings can be added with 24 beds or 48 
beds to each typical floor. In other words it will be a building which 
will have "elbow room" for many years to come. 

Ideally Infants' Hospital should occupy one of the floors, and it is 
earnestly hoped that there will be no legal complications to prevent 
their being a part of the new centralized unit. 

To reach all parts of the new hospital by elevator, is going to 
mean greater efficiency throughout, it is going to mean better super- 
vision throughout, it is going to eliminate the necessity of trans- 
porting patients a considerable distance through changing tempera- 
tures to x-ray, etc., and last but not least we will have a modern 
building with all the latest improvements — a building of which 
we will be truly proud. 

Let us hope that the next Annual Report will contain plans for 
the new Infants' Hospital. 

G. v. L. Meyer, Director 



{6 } 





iiiisiiiiiiiiiii 

iiiiiliia 



tBlF 







\7 > 



REPORT OF NURSING SERVICE 



PHE Infants' Hospital continues to make an important contribu- 
■*■ tion to the education of nurses, and in turn the School of Nursing 
furnishes a large amount of nursing service. During the year clinical 
experience on the wards of the Infants' Hospital has been given to 
35 student nurses from the Children's Hospital School of Nursing, and 
approximately 250 affiliating students. 

We have had a relatively stable graduate staff at the Infants' 
Hospital during the year, although one head nurse was absent for 
several months due to illness. While the staff has been stable, it has 
not been adequate in numbers. We have had one vacancy most of 
the year. One head nurse is going into the Service early in the new 
year. Of our three general staff nurses, one is only part-time. We 
have had more student nurses, but more students should mean more 
supervision. We also lack two ward helpers who assisted with the 
care of convalescent babies. 

Additional student nurses have, been assigned to day, relief and 
night duty in the premature nursery, and the care of these infants is 
completely isolated from the care of the ward patients. That change 
has resulted in less infection among the babies. This is a progressive 
step, but, as we have indicated before, there should be a graduate 
nurse, apart from the regular ward staff, at all times in the premature 
room. No provision in the budget has ever been made for such 
service. Under present conditions it is unlikely that we could get the 
personnel but if it were provided for in the budget, at least we would 
have the authorization to attempt to find such people. 

Our illness record is higher than for some time. Last year the 
average number of students off duty daily for illness or leave of ab- 
sence following illness was .96; this year it is 1.2. The graduate staff, 
except for a long leave of absence for one head nurse, had a better 
record than last year. 

A new Hess bed, complete with oxygen unit, has greatly facili- 
tated the care of prematures or those needing oxygen. The two new 
steam rooms, which are being built on the upper ward, w T ill furnish 
much more satisfactory care for infants with respiratory infections, 
and the provision for drainage will make it no longer necessary for the 
nurse to stand in a pool of water. 

48 > 



The treatment room records show the following treatments 



Intravenous 


1506 


Clyses 


1598 


Transfusions 


569 


Lumbar punctures 


855 


Constant intravenous 


32 



Respectfully submitted, 

Stella Goostray, 
December 31, 1943. Superintendent of Nurses 



49 \ 



REPORT OF SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



~^\URING the past year a total of 175 cases was referred to the 
*^ Social Service Department by the nurses and doctors in the 
Infants' Hospital. 

Some of the problems mentioned in last year's Annual Report 
intensified in 1943. One half of the babies brought to our atten- 
tion in January and February were because the families claimed 
they did not have enough fuel oil to keep the babies well. Every 
effort was made to verify the need and fulfill it through special requests. 
With the introduction of food rationing it was necessary to offer to 
several families assistance in the use of these stamps together with 
budgeting their food allowances in view of the rising cost of living. 
Families receiving public relief were very much in the minority. 
There were no cases where supplementation of the income was neces- 
sary to meet the medical emergency even in those families where the 
father was in the Armed Services. 

Approximately one half of the patients referred to the Social 
Service Department were children of men either in the Armed Forces 
or about to be inducted. This brought the Social Service Department 
into close alliance with the Home Service of the American Red Cross. 
Numerous calls were received from the Red Cross to verify medical 
conditions of patients, pending the granting of furloughs to fathers 
to come to their children's bedsides. Distance is no barrier in severe 
illness and several fathers arrived from points as far west as San Diego, 
California, and from as far south as Tampa, Florida. 

Of the 18 children referred for institutional placements in the 
State Schools for mental defectives approximately 10 of the fathers 
were in the Service. This fact complicated an already difficult problem 
of placement. These placements are under ordinary circumstances 
very hard to make because of emotional difficulties on the part of 
parents and because of lack of resources. With the fathers gone to 
war the mothers tend to cl ng to the social worker. Recently two 
patients, victims of meningitis, needed permanent placement. Both 
were first babies with their mothers in their early twenties. After 
their husbands entered the army, these women focused their love and 
attention on their children. When the children became destined to 
custodial care for life, these mothers had nothing left and required 
great support and encouragement. 

00 } 



Another difficulty encountered was that of placing children with 
normal intelligence in foster homes either for short placements during 
emergencies or for long intervals. Regardless of the time element it 
was very difficult to obtain a foster home from any of the child plac- 
'ng agencies. Many of the foster mothers have secured defense work 
and their high wages are more attractive than the small remunera- 
tion for boarding children. The Wellesley Convalescent Home has 
been a great help to us in times of emergency. On a Saturday after- 
noon last summer a mother on her way to a hospital for an emergency 
operation brought her 18 months old baby here planning to leave 
him. This baby had previously been a patient in the Infants' 
Hospital but there was no medical reason to admit him again. There 
was little time to do any planning but the superintendent of the 
Convalescent Home came to the rescue by accepting this patient 
immediately. Another baby was deserted by her mother and dis- 
covered by a relative a day later who brought her to the hospital 
in a neglected state. The Convalescent Home again saved the day 
by taking the child and keeping her until a plan was made with the 
relatives to make a home. There were also the perennial problems 
of broken homes, discord of parents, excessive drinking, and poor 
care of children. 

Although the social worker shares her time with the Medical 
Out-Patient Department of The Children's Hospital, her office is 
located in the Infants' Hospital so she may work as closely as possible 
with the medical and nursing staffs there. In addition to her regular 
duties the social worker supervised a student from the Simmons 
College School of Social Work who received part of her experience on 
the wards of the Infants' Hospital. The social worker has made a 
practice of attending Grand Rounds every Tuesday morning and on 
several occasions has entered into the discussion by presenting social 
background when pertinent. An effort has been made to go on the 
regular morning rounds once a week with the Resident and House 
Officers and it is usually at these times that the social problems of 
the patient are revealed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen D. Scott, 

Social Service Worker 



in } 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1944 



President 
ARTHUR G. ROTCH 
137 Marlborough Street 

Secretary 

CHARLES M. ROTCH 

30 State Street 

Assistant Secretary 
HENRY W. PALMER, JR. 

Treasurer 

LINCOLN BAYLIES 
441 Stuart Street 

CHARLES M. ROTCH — Assistant Treasurer 



DIRECTORS 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Mrs. F. I. Amory 

Mrs. William Benjamin Bacon 

Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 

Lincoln Baylies 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Hasket Derby 

Charles Devens 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 

Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 

Marcien Jenckes 

Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 



Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George v. L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
F. L. W. Richardson, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 
Dr. Richard M. Smith 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. S. D. Warren 
Henry K. W t hite 



Lincoln Baylies 



Finance Committee 
Arthur G. Rotch 



Charles M. Rotch 



Hospital Director 
George v. L. Meyer 



Physician-in- Chief 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 



Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



CONSULTANTS 



Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
William H. Howell, M.D. 



Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. 
Fritz B. Talbot, M.D. 



in > 



ACTIVE STAFF 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. — Physician-in-Chief 

Visiting Physicians 

Bronson Crothers, M.D. *Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. Charles A. Janeway, M.D. 

Louis K. Diamond, M.D. Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 

James L. Gamble, M.D. Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Physicians 
Olga E. Allers, M.D. *Charles D. May, M.D. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. Dorothea M. Moore, M.D. 

Stewart H. Clifford, M.D. Edward L. Pratt, M.D. 

*R. Cannon Eley, M.D. Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 

Henry E. Gallup, M.D. Alfred T. Shohl, M.D. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 
William E. Ladd, M.D. — Surgeon-in-Chief 

Visiting Surgeons 
*Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 
Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. (Neurosurgery) 
*Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. (Otolaryngology) 

Associate Visiting Surgeons Assistant Surgeon 

George D. Cutler, M.D. *John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 

Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 

Robert E. Gross, M.D. Visiting Otolaryngologist 

Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 
Associate Surgeons 

*Henry W. Hudson, M.D. Associate Visiting Otolaryngologists 

*Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

*Augustus Thorndike, M.D. *Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Research Associate in Otolaryngology 
*Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Frank R. Ober, M.D. — Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 

Orthopedic Surgeon Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons 

James W. Sever, M.D. A. H. Brewster, M.D. 

William T. Green, M.D. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. — Pathologist-in-Chief 

Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Director, Chemistry Laboratory Bacteriologist 

James L. Gamble, M.D. John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Roentgenologist — Edward B. D. Neuhauser, M.D. 
Dermatologist — E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 
Ophthalmologist — J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 
Stomatologist — Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 
Social Service — Miss Marion Hall 



On leave of absence with the U. S. Armed Forces. 

{13 > 



LADIES' AID OFFICERS FOR 1944 



Chairman 
MRS. WILLIAM BENJAMIN BACON 

Vice Chairman 
MRS. GEORGE BATY BLAKE 

Second Vice Chairman 
MRS. JOHN A. V. DAVIES 

Third Vice Chairman 
MISS IDA C. SMITH 

Secretary 
MRS. FREDERIC B. KELLOGG 

Treasurer 
MRS. FRANKLIN KING 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

MRS. FRANKLIN KING, Treasurer 

January 1st, 1943 — January 1st, 1944 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand January 1st, 1943 $710.34 

Dues 820.00 

Donations 389.50 

Chances on bicycle 305.50 

PAYMENTS 

Bed for year $600.00 

Materials and supplies for hospital 508.55 

Postage and printing 37.36 

Share of circus 18.34 

Bank service charges 1 .06 

Balance January 1st, 1944 



$2,225.34 



$1165.31 
1060.03 

$2225.34 



{14 } 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE— ANNUAL REPORT 



THE Ladies' Aid Committee has met throughout the year on a 
restricted wartime schedule. It was recently decided to hold 
only three meetings a year, in October, January (annual meeting), 
and May. 

The emphasis of the committee has been on volunteer work in 
the hospital. This has been carried on successfully by members of 
the committee. 

The benefit which was a feature activity for many years has not 
lately been practicable and, therefore, to supplement the dues, all 
members were again urged to oversubscribe, with such good results 
that a free bed was endowed. 

Mrs. Bacon secured a coca-cola machine, whose revenue benefited 
the hospital, and which was much in demand in the hot weather. 

Mr. Floyd Bell has been doing publicity for the committee. 

A tablet in memory of Dr. Blackfan was unveiled. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sarita B. Kellogg, 

Secretary 



{15 } 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. 


Gordon Abbott, Jr. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


TlMOTHEE ADAMOWSKI 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Charles F. Adams, Jr. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


David Ames 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


John S. Ames, Jr. 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Olivia Ames 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Francis I. Amory 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


J. Austin Amory 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Roger Amory 


Miss 


Mrs. 


William Benjamin Bacon 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Talbot Baker 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


James O. Bangs 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


B. Devereaux Barker 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


J. L. P. Barker 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


William DeFord Beal 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Edward L. Bigelow 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Kenneth D. Blackfan 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


George Baty Blake 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


John A. Blanchard 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Thomas S. Blumer 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Cameron Bradley 


Mrs. 


***A/T 


rs. J. Gardner Bradley 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


John F. Bradley 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Barbara Bremer 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


J. Lewis Bremer 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Elsie C. Brewer 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Davenport Brown 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Theodore E. Brown 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Edmund J. Burke 


Mrs 


Mrs. 


Frederic M. Burnham 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Nina Burnham 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


F. Wadsworth Busk 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Samuel Cabot 


Mrs. 


Miss Andree Cassels 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


William Caswell 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Ephron Catlin 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Charles E. Channing 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Theodore Chase 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Joseph Choate, III 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Frederic C. Church 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Forrester A. Clark 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Henry C. Clark 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Nathaniel T. Clark 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Robert J. Clark 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Eliot Codman 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Sargent F. Collier 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Lawrence Coolidge 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


T. Jefferson Coolidge 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Frederick G. Crocker 


Miss 


Mrs. 


Taylor Crowninshield 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Charles C. Cunningham 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Edward Cunningham, Jr. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Christopher Cutler 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Roger W. Cutler 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Richard Danielson 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


John A. V. Davies 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Frederick M. Dearborn, Jr. 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Charles Devens 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


J. Lindsay Dexter 


Mrs. 



William Dexter 
Frederick W. Eaton 
Samuel Eliot 
Robert W. Emmons, Jr. 
Robert Faxon 
William S. Febiger 
John Flint 
Lawrence Foster 
Eleanor Frothingham 
Louis A. Frothingham 
Marshall Fulton 
John D. Gannett 
Thomas Gannett 
George P. Gardner, Jr. 
Harrison Gardner 
Wallace Goodrich 
Francis C. Gray 
Henry V. Greenough 
James C. Greenway, Jr. 
Henry S. Grew 
Brinley N. Hall 
John L. Hall 
John M. Hall 
Nathaniel Hamlen 
Paul Hamlen 
Huntington R. Hardwick 
Richard Harte 
Andrew H. Hepburn 
Christian A. Herter 
Frederic P. Herter 
Amor Hollingsworth, Jr. 
Chandler Hovey, Jr. 
Charles F. Hovey 
James M. Hunnewell 
Benjamin Huntington 
G. Newell Hurd 
Mark Jouett 
Edmund S. Kelley, Jr. 
Frederic B. Kellogg 
William Kemble 
Alfred Kidder, II 
Franklin King 
Gelston T. King 
Alexander H. Ladd, Jr. 
William E. Ladd 
Gardiner M. Lane 
Howard Lapsley 
John E. Lawrence 
Luisita A. Leland 
Charles E. Mason, Jr. 
Henry L. Mason, Jr. 
Frederick S. Mead 
Houghton Metcalf 
Charles Meyer 
Charles G. Mixter, Jr. 
Sherman Morss 
J. Lothrop Motley 
Hamilton Osgood 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Augustin H Parker, Jr. 



{16 } 



Mr . Francis S. Parker 

Mrs. William A. Parker 

Mrs. Thomas N. Perkins, Jr. 

Mrs. Carleton Pike 

Mrs. Arnold Porter 

Mrs. Brooks Potter 

Mrs. George Putnam 

Mrs. Winthrop Pyemont 

Mrs. Eugene Record 

Mrs. Lawrence Reeve 

***Mrs. Charles F. Richardson 

Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 

Mrs. Joseph P. Richardson 

Mrs. Sherwood Rollins 

Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 

Mrs. Re-nouf Russell 

Mrs. Henry B. Sawyer 

Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 

Mrs. Philip S. Sears 

Mrs. Richard D. Sears, Jr. 

Mrs. S. Parkman Shaw 

Mrs. F. Foster Sherburne 

Mrs. J. Henry Sleeper 

Mrs. Stephen W. Sleeper 

***Miss Ida C. Smith 

Mrs. Richard M. Smith 

Mrs. William S. Spaulding 

Miss Faith Stanwood 

Mr\ Malcolm C. Stewart 



Mrs. Philip Stockton 

Mrs. R. C. Storey 

Mrs. Richard C Storey, Jr. 

Mrs. George H. Swift 

Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 

Mrs. Nathan Talbot 

Mrs. Thomas C. Thacher, Jr. 

Mrs. Warren Thayer 

Mrs. John A. Tuckerman 

Mrs. Sears Tuckerman 

Mrs. F. Skiddy von Stade, Jr. 

Mrs. Bayard Warren 

Miss Camilla Warren 

Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 

Mrs. Donald C. Watson 

Mrs. Charles Weed 

Mrs. George S. Weld 

Mrs. Philip S. Weld 

Miss Mary West 

Mrs. Howard Whiteside 

Mrs. Edward A. Whitney 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Winthrop 

Mrs. Roger Wolcott 

Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott 

Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr. 



Honorary Members. 



{17 > 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



LINCOLN BAYLIES, TREASURER 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1943 



ASSETS 



Cash : $ 653.16 

Investments; 

General Fund $429,778.92 

Permanent Fund 277,051.98 

706,830.90 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr., Memorial Hospital 

and Equipment 145,451.40 



TOTAL ASSETS $852,935.46 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Children's Hospital — Current Account. . . . '. $ 4,324.44 

General Fund 418,379.36 

Beverly Farms ( Massachusetts) Real Estate Fund 8,486.21 

Hospital and Equipment Fund 145,451.40 

Permanent Fund 276,294.05 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUNDS $852,935.46 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1943 

RECEIPTS 

Income from Investments $ 32,358.97 

Donations; 

Greater Boston Community Fund.. . . $21,845.00 

Permanent Charity Fund 2,000.00 

Direct Donations for General Purposes 830.00 

Eugene Fay Trust Fund 200.00 

Grosberg Family Charity Fund 100.00 

Charles A. Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

25,025.00 

Income — Children's Hospital 33,457.65 

Miscellaneous Income — — 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $90,841.62 

{18 > 



PAYMENTS 



Expense— Children's Hospital $94,435.28 

Salaries 1,436.00 

Publicity and Advertising 520.00 

Audit of Children's Hospital 200.00 

Audit of Infants' Hospital 75.00 

Insurance 192.50 

Rent and Light 180.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 60.00 

Office Supplies and Expenses , . 67.91 



TOTAL PAYMENTS .-,„..... $97,166.69 



Excess of Payments over Receipts for year ending 

December 31, 1943 $6,325.07 



CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 

To the Officers and Trustees of The Infants Hospital: 

We have made an examination of the financial books and records 
of The Infants' Hospital for the year ended December 31, 1943. 

We satisfied ourselves that all recorded cash receipts were de- 
posited in the bank, and we examined cancelled checks for all dis- 
bursements. We verified the balance of cash in bank by a certificate 
from the depository. 

On January 5, 1944, we inspected the securities held in the Gen- 
eral and Restricted Funds. There were no changes in the list between 
December 31, 1943, and the date of our count. 

In our opinion, based on such examination and subject to the 
qualification that securities are shown at book values, the accompany- 
ing statement of assets and liabilities and of income and expense 
present fairly the financial condition of the Hospital at December 31, 
1943, and the results of its operations for the year then ended. 



Charles F. Rittenhouse & Company 
Certified Public Accountants 



Boston, Massachusetts 
March 21, 1944. 



{19 > 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE PERMANENT FUND 

December 31, 1943 



BONDS Due Rate 

Central Pacific Railway Company 1949 4 

Central of Georgia Railway Company. . . . 1959 5 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R.R. 111. Div. 1949 4 

Chicago & Western Indiana Railroad 1952 4 

Cities Service Power & Light, Debenture.. 1952 53^2 

Columbia Gas & Electric Company 1961 5 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Associates 1956 4 

Florida Power & Light Company 1954 5 

Great Northern Railway Company 1973 5 

Illinois Power & Light Corporation 1953 6 

Kentucky Utilities 1970 4 

Lawyers Mortgage Investment Corp. of 

Boston, Series A-l 1945 

Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company. 2003 \ x /i 

Minnesota Power & Light Company . .... 1978 43^ 

Monongahela Railway Company 1966 334 

Montana Power Company 1966 3^4 

New 7 York Central & Hudson River Rail- 
road Company 1998 33^ 

New York Central & Hudson River Rail- 
road Company 1997 33^2 

New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad. 1978 43^ 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. . . 1948 6 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. . 1947 4 

Northern States Power Company 1967 33^ 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 1970 3^4 

Texas & Pacific Railway Company 1977 5 

U. S. Treasury Series G. . . . 1954 23^2 

Wabash Railroad Company 1991 434 

Total Bonds 



STOCKS No. of Shares 

Allied Chemical and Dye 35 $ 5,683.13 

Aluminum Company of America, Pfd 100 10,712.50 

Boston & Albany R.R. Company, Common 15 • 3,070.00 

Boston Edison Company 400 15,981.95 

Duquesne Light Company, Pfd 100 9,750.00 

Kennecott Copper Company, Common. . . 150 5,590.20 

Liggett and Myers. ' '. . . 60 5,280.00 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Co. 25 2,398.34 

New Hampshire Fire Insurance Companv. 110 4,840.00 

Pennsylvania Railroad Companv 200 10,000.00 

Quincv Market Cold Storage Co., Pfd... 16 1,600.00 

Southwestern Public Service, Pfd 100 11,000.00 

Standard Oil Company of Ohio, Pfd 100 10,300.00 

Union Pacific Railroad Co., Common 25 3,000.00 

Wabash Railroad Company 45 990.00 

Total Stocks $100,196.12 



Par 


Book 


Value 


Value 


$ 5,000.00 


$ 5,012.50 


10,000.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


4,750.78 


10,000.00 


9,675.00 


15,000.00 


14.200.00 


5,000.00 


5,175.00 


10,000.00 


9,650.00 


10,000.00 


9,525.00 


10,000.00 


9,250.00 


9,000.00 


8,865.00 


10,000.00 


10,450.00 


10,000.00 


649.76 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


8,000.00 


8,321.23 


10,000.00 


10,250.00 


10,000.00 


9,491.35 


5,000.00 


4,800.00 


5,000.00 


4,400.00 


8,000.00 


5,070.00 


2,500.00 


2,462.74 


6,000.00 


6,480.00 


10,000.00 


9,537.50 


10,000.00 


9,800.00 


5,000.00 


3,500.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


1,800.00 


540.00 


$200,300.00 


$176,855.86 



Total Permanent Fund Investments $277,051.98 

4 20 > 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE GENERAL FUND 



December 31, 1943 



BONDS Due 

Arkansas Power and Light Company 1956 

Boston & Maine Railroad — 1st Motrgage . 1955 

Boston & Maine Railroad — 1st Mortgage . 1960 

Boston & Maine Railroad — Income Bonds 1970 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad.. . 1971 

Chicago Union Station Company E 1963 

Chicago and Western Indiana R.R. "C". . 1952 

Columbia Gas & Electric Corporation .... 1961 

Illinois Power & Light Corporation 1956 

International Paper Company 1955 

New York Central Railroad 1952 

New York, Chicago & St. Louis R.R., Ref. 1978 

New York Steam 1963 

Potomac Edison Company 1961 

Puget Sound Power & Light 1972 

Safe Harbor Water Power Corporation . . . 1979 

Saguenay Power Company, Ltd ' 1966 

Shawinigan Water & Power Company. . . . 1967 

Southern Railway Company 1956 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 1964 -69 

United Stock Yards Corporation 1951 

Virginia Public Service Co., 1st Mortgage. 1972 

Western Maryland Railway 1977 

Total Bonds 



Rate 

5 
5 
4 

±Vi 

5 

4 

5 
5 
6 

3 l A 

43^ 
3 l A 
43^ 
4M 
4^ 
4^ 

43^ 
6 

2V 2 
4^ 
3% 

sy 2 



Par 

Value 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

3,200.00 

8,000.00 

10,000.00 

18,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

6,000.00 

8,000.00 

12,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

14,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 



Book 
Value 
9,575.00 
4,625.00 
3,200.00 
7,505.00 
8,650.00 

19,794.14 
5,212.50 
5,219.62 
6,255.00 
7,971.32 

10,005.00 
4,062.50 
5,362.50 
9,950.00 

14,595.00 
9,691.25 

10,000.00 
6,196.95 
9,650.00 
5,000.00 
9,800.00 

10,400.00 
4,987.50 



$194,200.00 $187,708.28 



STOCKS 
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. . . . 
Consolidated Natural Gas Company .... 

Dayton Power & Light, 4^% Pfd 

Draper Corporation 

E. I. Du Pont de Nemours 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Assoc, 6% Pfd 

First National Bank of Boston 

First National Bank of New York 

General Electric Company, Common .... 
General Motors Corporation, 5% Pfd... . 
Great American Insurance Company. . . . 
Nashua Manufacturing Co. — 1st Pfd. . . . 
Nashua Manufacturing Co. — 2nd Pfd... . 

National Fire Insurance Company 

Pacific Gas and Electric 

Phillips Petroleum 

Phoenix Insurance Company 

Public Service Co. of Colorado, 7% Pfd. . 

Saco-Lowell Shops, Common 

Saco-Lowell Shops, 7% Pfd 

Southern Pacific Railroad, Common 

Standard Oil of New Jersey 

Union Pacific Railroad 

United Fruit Company, Common 

United States Steel Company, Common . . 
Western Pennsylvania Power, 4}^>% Pfd. . 

Total Stocks 

Total General Fund Investments 



No. 



of Shares 
117 

12 

50 
875 

35 
200 
150 
4 
800 
100 
160 
100 
100 

85 
200 
125 

60 

50 
150 
150 
100 
125 
100 
100 
100 

50 



$ 21,692.27 

318.84 

5,450.00 

47,673.75 
5,285.00 

18,600.00 
6,921.88 
6,080.00 

29,600.00 

12,025.26 
4,808.00 
6,000.00 
4,100.00 
5,121.25 
5,075.00 
5,711.15 
5,580.00 
5,550.00 
1,000.00 
4,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,093.04 
8,002.50 
8,020.20 

10,000.00 
5,362.50 

$242,070.64 

$429,778.92 



{21 } 



MEMBERS OF CORPORATION 



Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Ames, Mrs. John S., Jr. 
Amory, Mrs. F. I. 
Anderson, Mrs. Larz 



Kaufmann, Mrs. Carl F. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Frederick B. 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, II 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M. 



Bacon, Mrs. William Benjamin 
Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 
Bartlett, Nelson S., Jr. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Nelson S., Jr. 
Baylies, Lincoln 
Beale, Arthur M. 
Bell, Mrs. Stoughton 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward L. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A. 
Bradley, Mrs. J. Gardner 
Bremer, Mrs. Theodore G. 
Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Cave, Mrs. Edwin F. 
Chapin, Mrs. John R. 
Clark, Mrs. R. J. 
Converse, Miss E. N. 
Crowninshield, Mrs. F. B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Allen 
Curtis, Mrs. E. R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 

Dane, Mrs. Ernest B., Jr. 
DeForde, Miss Alice 
Derby, Hasket 
Devens, Charles 



Ladd, Mrs. William E. 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Liggett, Louis K. 
Lovett, Mrs. R. W. 



Merriman, Mrs. Roger B. 
Meyer, George v. L. 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble 

Nickerson, Mrs. Roland W. 

O'Connell, P. A. 



Palmer, Mrs. Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W. 
Palmer, Mrs. Henry W., Jr. 
Palmer, Henry W., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. F. S. 



Richardson, F. L. W., Jr. 
Richardson, Mrs. Homer B. 
Rotch, Arthur G. 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Rotch, Charles M. 



Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 

Forbes, F. Murray 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 

Hall, Mrs. John L. 
Hall, John M. 
Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Hamlen, Mrs. P. M. 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. 
Homans, Mrs. John 
Hovey, Mrs. Charles F. 
Howes, Mrs. Osborne 
hunnewell, f. w. 



Iasigi, Mrs. Mary V. 
Ide, Miss E. K. 

Jackson, Mrs. James 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Jr. 
Jenckes, Marcien 



Sargent, Mrs. S. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Henry R. 
Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. 
Sears, Mrs. Philip S. 
Seymour, Robert W. 
Shaw, S. Parkman, Jr. 
Sheafe, Mrs. William 
Simmons, Mrs. G. W. 
Smith, Dr. Richard M. 
Stillman, Mrs. Carl S. 
Stockton, Mrs. Philip 



Talbot, Mrs. Fritz B. 
Tarbell, Mrs. John F. 
Thacker, Mrs. T. C. 
Tower, Miss E. M. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry 



Warren, Mrs. Fiske 
Warren, Mrs. S. D. 
Webster, Edwin S. 
Windeler, Mrs. G. H. 



4 22 } 



1943 CONTRIBUTORS 



Anonymous Contributors (34) 
Abbott, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon, Jr. 
Adams, Miss Ethelind 
Agoos, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon 
Aldrich, Mr. William T. 
Aldrich, Mrs. William T. 
Ames, Mr. John S. 
Ames, Mr. and Mrs. John S., Jr. 
Amory, Mr. and Mrs. Francis I. 
Ayer, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. 

Barbour, Miss Julia A. 

Barlow, Miss Mary L. 

Bartol, Dr. and Mrs. John W. 

Baxter, Miss Amy S. 

Beal, Miss Edith 'L. 

Bemis, Mrs. A. Farwell 

Bemis, Albert Farwell Charity Trust 

Blumer, Mrs. Thomas S. 

Boston Mfrs. Mutual Fire Ins. Co. Emps. 

Bowden, Mrs. Herbert L. 

Bradlee, Mr.,and Mrs. Henry G. 

Bremer, Mrs. S. F. 

Brooks, Mr. Gorham 

Buff, Miss Alice E. E. 

Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Cabot, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 

Campbell, Mr. Walter M. 

Carter, John & Co., Inc. 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B. 

Chase, Miss Alice P. 

Chase, Arthur T. 

Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Talbot C. and 

family 
Children's Hospital Employees, The 
Church, Mr. and Mrs. Frederic C, Jr. 
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel J. 
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. 
Colby Memorial Trust 
Committee of Permanent Charity 
Condit, Miss Louise 
Converse, Miss E. Watt 
Count way, Mr. Francis A. 
Creighton, Mr. and Mrs. Albert M. 
Crocker, Mrs. George H. 
Crowninshield, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. 
Curtis, Mr. Albert H. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Curtiss, Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. 
Cutler, Com. and Mrs. Roger W. 

Dalton, Henry R. deceased (1943) 

Dane, Mrs. John 

Davenport, Mrs. George H. 

Dean Welfare Trust 

Dennett, Mr. and Mrs. Carl P. 

DeNormandie, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Y., 

and Miss DeNormandie 
Densmore, Mrs. G. Ellis 
Devens, Lt. and Mrs. 



Elliot, Mr. and Mrs. John M. 
Emery, Mrs. Forrest S. 
Emmons, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. 
Emmons, Mrs. R. W., Sr. 
Evans, Mrs. David J. 

Faulkner, Mrs. James M. 

Fay, Eugene F. Estate 

Federal Employees 

Fegan, Mrs. William J. 

Fessenden, Mr. and Mrs. Sewell H. 

Flagg, Mr. and Mrs. Elisha 

Fogg, Mr. and Mrs. George P. 

Folsom, Mr. Grenville W. 

Forbes, Dr. and Mrs. Alexander 

Fox, Miss Edith 

Francis, Mrs. G. Tappan 

Friedman, Misses Lee M., Elsie J., 

Sophie M. 
Frost, Mr. Donald McKay 
Frost, Mrs. Rufus H. 
Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 

Gilbert, Miss Helen C. 
Goodrich, Mrs. Wallace 
Goodwin, Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. 
Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Francis C. 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald 
Grew, Mr. Edward W. 
Grew, Mrs. Edward W. 
Grosberg Family Charity Fund 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Hall, Capt. and Mrs. John M. 
Halsev, Mrs. Fuller 
Hamlen, Mrs. Paul M. 
Hasenfus, Mr. Nathaniel J. 
Herman, Mrs. Joseph M. 
Herter, Mr. and Mrs. Christian A. 
Hoag, Mrs. Charles R. 
Hopkins, Miss Emma Adelia 
Houghton, Mrs. Clement S. 
Houghton, Mr. Clement S. 
Howe, Mr. James C. 
Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. 
Hulburd, Mrs. Charles F. 
Hunnewell, Mr- James M. 
Hunnewell, Mrs. James M. 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 
Jenkins Brothers 

King, Mr. and Mrs. Gelston T. 
Klopot, Mr. Abraham 

Ladd, Dr. and Mrs. W T illiam E. 
Ladies' Aid Committee 
Lane, Miss Emma G. 
Lawrence, Miss Mary B. 
Leland, Mr. Joseph D. 



•{23 > 



Leland, Miss Luisita A. 
Lever Bros. Company 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. George, Jr. 
Loring, Mrs. Augustus P., Jr. 
Loring, Mr. Augustus p 



juurmg, .Lvii. Augustus P., Jr. 
Loring, Mr. and Mrs. Caleb 
Loring, Miss Marjorie C. 
Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald T. 
Lyman, Mr. Theodore 



Loring 
Lyman 
Lyman 

Mahady, E. F. Co. and Employees 
Mason, Mrs. Austin B. 
Matlack, Miss Judith 
Meigs, Mrs. May Weston 
Meredith & Grew, Inc. Employees 
Merrill, Mrs. Luther M. 
Monks, Mrs. George H. 
Moore, Prof, and Mrs. Edward C. 
Moors, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. 
Morse, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. 
Moseley, Mrs. Frederick S. 
Motley, Mr. and Mrs. Lothrop 

Newell, Mr. Franklin S. 
N. E. Power Assn. & Affil. Cos. Emps. 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Emps. 
Newman, Mrs. Samuel J. 

Parker, Mr. Augustin H. 
Parker, Mrs. Augustin H., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. J. Harleston 
Parker, Mr. and Mrs. William A. 
Peabody, Rev. and Mrs. Endicott 
Peavy, Mrs. Leopold 
Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T. 
Phelan, Mrs. James J. 
Pickman, Mr. and Mrs. D. L. 
Pokat Printing Company 
Putnam, Mr. and Mrs. George 

Rantoul, Mrs. Neal 
Ratshesky, Theresa S. 
Reed, Miss Emily S. 
Reed, Miss Ida B. 



Rice, Mr. Harry L. 
Rice, Mr. John C. 
Richardson, Mrs. Charles F. 
Rimbach, Mrs. Mabelle B. 
Rothwell, Mr. James M. 
Rousmaniere, Miss Mary S. 

Sanderson, Mr. E. I. 

Sears, Mrs. Richard D. 

Shaw, Miss Miriam 

Shaw, Mr. and Mrs. S. Parkman 

Sias, Mrs. Alice E. 

Smith, Mrs. Charles L. 

Smith, Miss Ida C. 

Spaulding, Mr. John T. 

Spaulding, Mrs. William S. 

Stanley, Mr and Mrs. J. 

Stockton, Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. 

Steinert, Mrs. Alexander 

Stevens, Mr. Moses T. 

Swift, Mr. and Mrs. George H. 

Sturgis, Mr. S. Warren 

Thomas, Miss Helen 

Thorp, Miss Alice A. 

Travelli, The Charles Irwin Fund 

Tuckerman, Mrs. Sears 

Vaughan, Miss Bertha H. 
Veazie, Miss Mary L. 

Wadsworth, Mrs. Eliot 
Wardwell, Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon E. 
Warren, Mrs. George E. 
Weld, Mrs. Rudolph 
Wheeler Reflector Company 
White, Mr. and Mrs. Henry K. 
Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. William, Jr. 
Wiggin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. 
Wiggin, Miss Maude L. 
Winsor, Mrs. Frederick 
Winthrop, Miss Clara B. 
Winthrop, Miss Katharine 
Winthrop, Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel 
Wolcott, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel H. 



•{24 > 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation: 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts the sum of 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL 







iSftlL 











SIXTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



For the Year 1944 



SIXTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 

i 944 

INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

300 LONG WOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 

Since 1881 the Infants' Hospital has provided medical 
treatment for infants without regard to race^ creed \ color 
or residence. 

Our Research Studies and training and experience given 
to Doctors ', Medical Students and Nurses may some day 

SAVE THE BABY IN YOUR OWN HOME. 

WHAT YOUR DOLLARS GIVE 

Light, heat, food, nurses and doctors for one baby 

for . . . 

One day costs $7-34 

Seven days cost $51.28 

One month costs $220.20 

$6000 endows a memorial bed in perpetuity. 






{2> 



REPORT OF THE PHYSICIAN-IN-CHIEF 



HHE year 1944 passed in the Infants' Hospital without any striking 
■*■ innovations. 

The arrangement for residents and interns has continued this 
year as previously and despite the obvious limitations of the acceler- 
ated program has worked surprisingly well. The resident and intern 
staff have been conscientious in their duties and have taken excellent 
care of the patients. 

The character of the admissions has not materially changed from 
previous years. There has been a moderate increase in the number of 
infants with tuberculosis. 

The equipment has been augmented by the addition of one Hess 
bed and new oxygen beds in the premature nursery. These beds are 
simple in construction and have proved very satisfactory. The new 
steam rooms which were added have been of great assistance in the 
care of children with certain respiratory diseases. They have been 
in constant use and in many instances, if they have not actually been 
the most important factor in the saving of life, have contributed 
greatly to this end. 

Epidemic diarrhea of the newborn still constitutes a major 
problem. We had one such severe epidemic this year in infants sent 
to us from a nearby hospital. Fortunately there was only one death 
although many cf the children were severely ill. We have had no 
severe cases of diarrhea developing among our own patients on the 
ward. This is a great improvement over some of the previous years. 

An investigation of the role of viruses in the etiology of certain 
cases of diarrhea in infants is being carried out by Dr. Janeway and 
Dr. Pratt. If it were possible to establish the causative agent in 
epidemic diarrhea it is reasonable to believe that much might be 
accomplished in prevention, limitation of spread, and treatment. 
This study is being carried on under a grant from the Mason Fund. 

Dr. Gamble and Dr. Pratt are now making quantitative measure- 
ments of water and electrolyte changes accompanying diarrheal 
disease. It is hoped that information gained by this method may lead 
to a better understanding of the underlying physiological disturbances 
and assist in establishing better treatment. This work is being carried 
on through a grant from the Mead Johnson and Company. One of 
the nurse's aids, Miss Gertrude Lanman, has rendered invaluable 
assistance in the detailed care of the patients during the period of 

{3} 



study. Dr. Shohl, with the aid of a grant from the Mead Johnson 
and Company, has continued his study of infants with pancreatic 
fibrosis and celiac disease. 

The Premature division is being used increasingly by physicians 
and hospitals throughout this area. Over a ten-year period, the total 
yearly admissions have increased from 48 in 1934 to 106 in 1944. 
The average monthly census has increased from 6 in 1937 to 16 in 
1944. What the Infants' Hospital has to offer in the care of pre- 
mature babies is a real service to the community and we are glad to 
make our facilities available to other hospitals who are not ade- 
quately equipped for the care of premature babies. 

The prevention and control of infection in premature infants 
remains a major problem. This matter has been given careful study 
during the last year and some new technics instituted at the Infants' 
Hospital may prove successful in this regard. Investigations are in 
progress to demonstrate the ability of the premature infant to absorb 
vitamin A and in collaboration with research workers at the Massa- 
chusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, a study is being carried out to 
determine the relation of vitamin A deficiency in premature infants 
to the growth of the eye. 

We wish to record our appreciation of the unfailing support given 
to the Staff by the Director of the Hospital and to express our sin- 
cere admiration for the efficiency and devotion of Miss Chapman. 
During her illness, Miss Furgin carried a double responsibility with 
marked efficiency. Miss LaRoe's skill in the care of premature infants 
has added materially to the successful treatment of these patients. 

I should like also to bear testimony to the great assistance which 
the nurses' aids and volunteers have added to the care of the patients. 

Respectfully submitted, 

{signed) Richard M. Smith, M.D., 

Physician-in- Ch ief 



m 




X 






MEDICAL STATISTICS 

Number of patients remaining in the hospital 

December 31, 1943 36 

Number of patients admitted during the year 1944. . 893 

Number of patients discharged during the year 1944. 893 

Number of patients remaining in the hospital 

December 31, 1944 36 

929 929 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $28.00 to $37.50. 

Number of patients — weekly rate — $28.00 441 

Number of patients — reduced rate per week — 75c to 

$28.00 434 

Number of patients — free 18 

Total number of hospital days 14,614 

Average number of patients daily 39 

Average days' stay 16 

DISCHARGED 

Relieved 639 

Unrelieved 69 

Transferred to other hospitals 39 

Discharged on parents' own responsibility or against 

advice 

Died 146 (15.7%) 

Total 893 

39 died in a few hours 
30 died in less than 24 hours 
14 died in less than 48 hours 
56.8% died in less than 48 hours 

G. v. L. Meyer, 

Director 
{5> 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 



PHE Infants' Hospital, like all other hospitals has experienced a 
J- typical war year, and has weathered the storm remarkably well, 
thanks to the enduring efforts of the personnel. It had been hoped 
that by now we could assume that the worst was over, but it would 
seem on the contrary that the year 1944 is going to be merely an ex- 
perience to guide us in the conduct of another difficult year to follow. 

The rainbow in the sky is the plan for the new hospital building 
to replace, not only the pavilion wards of The Children's Hospital, 
but the Infants' Hospital as well. 

The plan is that the Infants' should have at least a floor of the 
new hospital. Their relations with The Children's Hospital would 
be unaltered. Its building would merely be superimposed on the 
Children's instead of being an horizontal unit connected with our 
hospital by passageways. A perpendicular connection by means of 
elevators will be of tremendous value to the well being of the Infants' 
Hospital. 

When an infant now is to be X-rayed, which is a frequent occur- 
rence, the poor baby has to be bundled up and carried through 
corridors of varying temperature a distance of 800 feet round trip to 
the X-ray Department. In the new building, they will step into an 
elevator and on issuing from the elevator they will be only a com- 
paratively few steps from the X-ray Department with no exposure 
to varying temperatures, and the amount of time that will be saved 
by nurses transporting children will be substantial. 

Furthermore, the excessibility of the Infants' Hospital to the 
various members of the Staff will then be the same as to all other wards 
in the hospital. 

It is believed that the atmospheric conditions in the summer 
months will be greatly improved by a tall building. 

The maintenance of the property has been below par, below what 
we should wish to do in normal times, but in spite of appearances, 
the property is in good condition, and repairs that are necessary to 
prevent deterioration have all been taken care of. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. v. L. Meyer, 

Director 
{6> 




0> 



REPORT OF NURSING SERVICE 



PHE nursing service of the Infants' Hospital has been as stable 
-*- as one may expect in time of war. The lower ward has had three 
different head nurses during the year. There have been frequent 
changes in the treatment room, and a new nurse in the premature 
nursery and one in the milk laboratory. Many of our problems are 
due to frequent changes rather than to lack of personnel. In a unit 
such as the Infants' Hospital, where the student personnel must be 
changed every month, the stability of the graduate staff and auxiliary 
helpers is exceedingly important. 

Shortages in other departments as the laundry, housekeeping 
department, etc. also have a definite effect on the nursing service. 
For example, if the laundry is short of workers, the laundry cannot 
be delivered on time or in necessary quantities and it takes the time 
of nurses to go to the laundry at intervals to get necessary linen. 

We are starting the new year with better arrangements for the 
care of premature babies and the milk laboratory than for some time, 
but the care of the premature babies will not approach anything like 
proper conditions until we have twenty-four-hour graduate service in 
the premature nursery. 

Three new type of oxygen tents for premature babies are in use. 
They are much simpler to use than the old type, and because they are 
made of plastocele the baby's condition may be more readily observed. 
The steam rooms were completed and are in almost constant use. 
They are very satisfactory except from the standpoint of plaster 
peeling. 

During the months of August and September the entire upper 
ward was used as a ward for newborn babies admitted with severe 
enteric infection. A great deal of nursing care was required, but it 
helped to save all but one baby. 

We have had some decrease in illness among personnel during the 
year. Among students it has amounted to approximately one less 
student ill daily. It is possible that the decrease among student 
nurses may be due to more reasonable hours, since the hours for day 
and relief duty were reduced to a forty-eight-hour week, including 
classes, which is the recommendation of the United States Public 
Health Service for cadet nurses. The change has not yet gone into 

{8} 



effect for night nurses. Most of the student nurses we now have are 
cadets. There has been no decrease in the total amount of service 
given by student nurses since more students have been assigned to 
the Infants' Hospital. 

During the year 314 student nurses have received one months' 
experience in the Infants' Hospital; of these 43 were Children's Hos- 
pital students and the others were affiliating students. 

We have continued to have Red Cross Nurse's Aides at the In- 
fants' Hospital and they and the War Service Volunteers of The 
Children's and Infants' Hospital have been exceedingly helpful. We 
are grateful to them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

{signed) Stella Goostray, 
Superintendent of Nurses 



m 



REPORT OF SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



I~N September there was a change in the set up of the Social Service 
■*■ Department in the Infants' Hospital when the present social 
worker took the place of Miss Scott who was transferred to the 
Orthopedic Service. Instead of sharing her time with the Social 
Service Department of The Children's Hospital, she works entirely 
for the Infants' Hospital, although on a part-time basis. 

Of the 140 cases referred to Social Service, the bulk of the cases 
fall into three main categories: the infants who as a result of menin- 
gitis, hydrocephalus, or congenital heart disease is left with a chronic 
condition, the infant with tuberculosis, and the premature baby. In 
the first group we have a large number of mental defectives who are 
referred to Social Service for placement. These cases continue to 
present a difficult problem to the social worker, because the resources 
for placement are limited, and parents find it hard to accept the fact 
that their child is mentally defective. 

In the cases of tuberculosis, it is imperative to make every effort 
to have all the contacts in the family examined, to provide sanatorium 
care whenever possible, and to deal with emotional attitudes of the 
family. Although great advances have been made in the treatment 
of tuberculosis there is still a stigma attached to this disease. In 
one instance, a whole family was broken up because of tuberculosis. 
One child died in the Infants' Hospital of tuberculosis meningitis. 
The father, the original contact, was then in a sanatorium, and a 
second child was admitted to Infants' Hospital with pulmonary tuber- 
culosis. There were originally in this family seven children. Examina- 
tion was arranged for the other members of the family, and a third 
child was found to have a tuberculous lesion. At present the father 
and two children are receiving sanatorium care. The mother receives 
financial support from a public agency, and the social w T orker over a 
period of time, helped her to accept her bad luck and carry on. 

Because good nursing care and proper feeding are essential for 
the premature baby, in these cases we need to know if the home can 
provide adequate care. As we work with these problems it becomes 
more and more apparent that we need the help and advice of the 
visiting nurse. We have, therefore, decided to adopt the policy of the 
Boston Lying-in which is to have 100% contact locally by the Public 
Health Nursing Association, and in the outlying districts by the Visit- 

•{10 > 



ing Nurse Association, prior to discharge. This plan will go into 
operation in the Infants' Hospital early in 1945. It will then be the 
responsibility of the social worker to review all the reports sent in by 
the visiting nurses, and to work further with those parents who 
present social problems which might interfere with their ability to give 
the baby adequate care. 

Because fuel oil rations have been more generous and unrationed 
foods more easily accessible, we have not had as many requests this 
year for letters to local ration boards. 

The problems of the service man's family have continued to 
persist, and we have found the Red Cross Home Service Department 
most co-operative. In the case of an infant with coeliac disease, the 
Red Cross financed an expensive predigested food which was essential 
to the life of the child. Through the Red Cross the granting of leaves 
in the case of serious illness has been facilitated. 

As an additional part of the social worker's routine, she shares in 
the teaching program of the student nurses by giving short talks on the 
medical-social aspects of certain diseases. In this regard it seems 
worth mentioning that many of the cases admitted to Infants' Hos- 
pital are admitted en the basis of social need, due in large measure 
to the wartime pressures placed upon the mother. 

As a new member of the Staff of the Infants' Hospital, I am most 
appreciative of its co-operative spirit, and look forward to further 
association with this hospital in 1945. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth F. Snedeker, 
Social Worker, Infants Hospital 



{ii} 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1945 



President 
ARTHUR G. ROTCH 
137 Marlborough Street 

Secretary 

CHARLES M. ROTCH 
30 State Street 

Assistant Secretary 
HENRY W. PALMER, JR. 

Treasurer 

LINCOLN BAYLIES 
441 Stuart Street 

CHARLES M. ROTCH— Assistant Treasurer 



DIRECTORS 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Mrs. William Benjamin Bacon 

Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 

Lincoln Baylies 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Mrs. F. B. Crowinshield 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Hasket Derby 

Charles Devens 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 

Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 

Marcien Jenckes 

Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 



Mrs. Alfred F. Kidder, II 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George v. L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
F. L. W. Richardson, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Henry K. White 



Lincoln Baylies 



Finance Committee 
Arthur G. Rotch 



Charles M. Rotch 



Hospital Director 
George v. L. Meyer 



Physician-in- Chief 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 



Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



CONSULTANTS 



Allen M. Butler, M.D. 
William H. Howell, M.D. 



Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. 
Fritz B. Talbot, M.D. 



112 > 



ACTIVE STAFF 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. — Physician-in-Chief 

Visiting Physicians 
Bronson Crothers, M.D. **Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. Charles A. Janeway, M.D. 

Louis K. Diamond, M.D. Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 

James L. Gamble, M.D. Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 

William G. Lennox, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Physicians 
Olga E. Allers, M.D. **Charles D. May, M.D. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. Dorothea M. Moore, M.D. 

Stewart H. Clifford, M.D. Edward L. Pratt, M.D. 

**R. Cannon Eley, M.D. Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 

Henry E. Gallup, M.D. Alfred T. Shohl, M.D. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 
William E. Ladd, M.D. — Surgeon-in-Chief 

Visiting Surgeons 

*Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 

Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. (Neurosurgery) 

**Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. (Otolaryngology) 

Associate Visiting Surgeons Assistant Surgeon 

George D. Cutler, M.D. *John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 

Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 

Robert E. Gross, M.D. Visiting Otolaryngologist 

Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 
Associate Surgeons 

**Henry W. Hudson, M.D. Associate Visiting Otolaryngologists 

**Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

**Augustus Thorndike, M.D. **Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Research Associate in Otolaryngology 
*Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. — Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 
Orthopedic Surgeon Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons 

James W. Sever, M.D. A. H. Brewster, M.D. 

William T. Green, M.D". ' 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. — Pathologist-in-Chief 

Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Director, Chemistry Laboratory Bacteriologist 

James L. Gamble, M.D. John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Roentgenologist — Edward B. D. Neuhauser, M.D. 
Dermatologist — E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 
Ophthalmologist — J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 
Stomatologist — Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 
Social Service — Miss Marion Hall 



** On leave with the U. S. Armed Forces. 

113> 



LADIES' AID OFFICERS FOR 1945 



Chairman 
MRS. WILLIAM BENJAMIN BACON 

Vice Chairman 
MRS. GEORGE BATY BLAKE 

Second Vice Chairman 
MRS. JOHN A. V. DAVIES 

Third Vice Chairman 
MISS IDA C. SMITH 

Secretary 
MRS. FREDERIC B. KELLOGG 

Treasurer 
MRS. FRANKLIN KING 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

MRS. FRANKLIN KING, Treasurer 
January 1st, 1944 — January 1st, 1945 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand January 1st, 1944 $1,060.03 

Dues. 755.00 

Donations 466.50 

Profits from coca cola machine 49.42 

Check from Pokat Printing Co 2.00 



$2,332.95 

PAYMENTS. 

Bed for year .' $600.00 

Subscription to Building Fund 500.00 

Materials and supplies for hospital 521.29 

Postage and printing 33.45 

Welfare Committee, Children's Hospital 

half proceeds from coke machine 6.78 

Bank Service Charges .50 

$1,662.02 

Balance January 1st, 1945 670.93 

$2,332.95 
114 * 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE -ANNUAL REPORT 



THE Ladies' Aid Committee has met four times during the year: 
three regular meetings and one extra meeting. Twenty-one mem- 
bers attended these meetings with an average of only eight each time 
from an active list of ninety-four members. 

The essential business of the committee has been dispatched : 
hospital linen bills have been paid, six hundred dollars has been given 
toward a free bed, as well as five hundred dollars to the Building 
Fund. This money came from over-subscription of dues. 

All peripheral activities such as volunteer work, keeping up cer- 
tain rooms in the hospital, and giving a benefit entertainment have 
been impossible with so few people willing and able to participate. 
Miss Smith and Mrs. Bacon have kept in touch with the hospital 
staff, but this has been the only connection. 

There are two new members and there have been no resignations 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sarita B. Kellogg, 

Secretary 



{15} 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 

Mrs. Timothee Adamowski 

Mrs. Charles F. Adams, Jr. 

Mrs. George D. Aldrich 

Mrs. David Ames 

Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Mrs. Francis I. Amory 

Mrs. Roger Amory 

Mrs. William Benjamin Bacon 

Mrs. Talbot Baker 

Mrs. James O. Bangs 

Mrs. B. Devereux Barker 

Mrs. B. Devereux Barker, Jr. 

Mrs. Thomas P. Beal 

Mrs. William DeFord Beal 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Mrs. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. George Baty Blake 

Mrs. John A. Blanchard 

Mrs. Thomas S. Blumer 

Mrs. Cameron Bradley, Jr. 

***Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley 

Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 

Mrs. Davenport Brown 

Mrs. Theodore Brown 

Mrs. Frederick M. Burnham 

Miss Nina Burnham 

Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 

Mrs. Samuel Cabot 

Miss Andree M. Cassels 

Mrs. Ephron Catlin, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles E. Channing 

Mrs. Theodore Chase 

Mrs. Joseph Choate, 3d 

Mrs. Frederick C. Church 

Mrs. Forrester A. Clark 

Mrs. Henrv C. Clark 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Clark 

Mrs. Robert J. Clark 

Mrs. Sargent F. Collier 

Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 

Mrs. T. Jefferson Coolidge, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick G. Crocker 

Mrs. Taylor Crowninshield 

Mrs. Charles C. Cunningham 

Mrs. Eric Cutler 

Mrs. George C. Cutler, Jr. 

Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 

Mrs. Roger W. Cutler, Jr. 

Mrs. B. Welch Dane 

Mrs. Richard E. Danielson 

Mrs. John A. V. Davies 

Mrs. Frederick M. Dearborn, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Devens 

Mrs. J. Lindsay Dexter 

Mrs. William Dexter 

Mrs. Frederick W. Eaton 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 



Mrs. Robert W. Emmons, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert M. Faxon 

Mrs. William S. Febiger 

Mrs. John G. Flint 

Mrs. Lawrence Foster 

Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 

Mrs. John D. Gannett 

Mrs. Thomas B. Gannett 

Mrs. John H. Gardiner 

Mrs. George P. Gardner, Jr. 

Mrs. Harrison Gardner 

Mrs. John W. Goodrich 

Mrs. Wallace Goodrich 

Mrs. Francis C. Gray 

Mrs. Henry V. Greenough 

Mrs. James C. Greenway, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry S. Grew 

Mrs. Brinley Hall 

Mrs. John L. Hall 

Mrs. John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Paul M. Hamlen 

Mrs. Huntington R. Hardwick 

Mrs. Richard Harte 

Mrs. Andrew H. Hepburn 

Mrs. Christian A. Herter 

Mrs. Amor Hollingsworth, Jr. 

Mrs. Chandler Hovey, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 

Mrs. James M. Hunnewell 

Mrs. Benjamin L. Huntington 

Mrs. G. Newell Hurd 

Mrs. Mark R. Jouett 

Mrs. Edmund S. Kelley, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederic B. Kellogg 

Mrs. William T. Kemble 

Mrs. Wisner Kenne 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder, 2nd 

Mrs. Franklin King 

Mrs. Gelston T. King 

Mrs. Alexander H. Ladd, Jr. 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. Howard Lapsley 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence 

Miss Luisita Leland 

Mrs. John L. Lyman 

Mrs. William DeFord Manice, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles E. Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry L. Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Houghton Metcalf 

Mrs. Charles A. Mever 

Mrs. Charles G. Mixter, Jr. 

Mrs. Sherman Morss 

Mrs. J. Lothrop Motley 

Mrs. Eleanor Frothingham Navarro 

Mrs. Hamilton Osgood 

Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 

Mrs. Augustin H. Parker, Jr. 



{16} 



Mrs. Francis S. Parker 

Mrs. William A. Parker 

Mrs. Thomas N. Perkins 

Mrs. Carleton Pike 

Mrs. Arnold Porter 

Mrs. Brooks Potter 

Mrs. George Putnam 

Mrs. Winthrop Pyemont 

Mrs. Eugene E. Record 

Mrs. Lawrence L. Reeve 

Mrs. Charles F. Richardson 

Mrs. Frederick L. W. Richardson, Jr. 

Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 

Mrs. Joseph P. Richardson 

Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 

Mrs. Renouf Russell, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry B. Sawyer 

Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 

Mrs. Philip S. Sears 

Mrs. Richard D. Sears, Jr. 

Mrs. S. Parkman Shaw 

Mrs. F. Foster Sherburne 

Mrs. J. Henry Sleeper 

Mrs. Stephen W. Sleeper 

***Miss Ida C. Smith 

Mrs. William S. Spaulding 

Miss Faith Stanwood 

Mrs. Malcolm C. Stewart 



Mrs. Philip Stockton 

Mrs. Richard C. Storey 

Mrs. Richard C. Storey, Jr. 

Mrs. George H. Swift 

Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 

Mrs. Nathan Talbot 

Mrs. Thomas C. Thacher 

Mrs. Warren Thayer 

Mrs. Peter Thompson 

Mrs. George Tiffany 

Mrs. John A. Tuckerman 

Mrs. Sears Tuckerman 

Mrs. F. Skiddy Von Stade, Jr. 

Mrs. Bayard Warren 

***Mrs. George E. Warren 

Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 

Mrs. Donald C. Watson 

Mrs. Charles H. Weed 

Mrs. George S. Weld 

Mrs. PhilipS. Weld 

Mrs. Howard S. Whiteside 

Mrs. Edward Allen Whitney 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Winthrop 

Mrs. Roger Wolcott 

Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr. 



Honorary Members 



{17} 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



LINCOLN BAYLIES, TREASURER 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1944 



ASSETS 

Cash $ 12,467.71 

Investments; 

General Fund $440,597.44 

Permanent Fund 275,702.70 

716,300.14 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr., Memorial Hospital 

and Equipment 145,451.40 



TOTAL ASSETS $874,219.25 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Children's Hospital— Current Account $ 8,486.28 

General Fund 432,015.45 

Beverly Farms (Massachusetts) Real Estate Fund. .... 8,486.21 

Hospital and Equipment Fund 145,451.40 

Permanent Fund 279,779.91 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUNDS $874,219.25 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1944 

RECEIPTS 

Income from Investments $ 33,718.76 S 

Donations; 

Greater Boston Community Fund . . . $21,685.00 

Permanent Charity Fund ........... 2,000.00 

Direct Donations for General Purposes 865.00 

Eugene Fay Trust Fund 200.00 

Grosberg Familv Charity Fund 100.00 

Charles A. Dean Welfare Trust 50.00 

24,900.00 

Income— 42,808.01/ 

Miscellaneous Income — — 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $101,426.77 

{18} 



PAYMENTS 



Expense— Children's Hospital $103,595.08 

Salaries 1,454.00 

Publicity and Advertising 491.16 

Audit of Children's Hospital 200.00 

Audit of Infants' Hospital 75.00 

Insurance 260.00 

Rent and Light 180.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 102.64 

Office Supplies and Expenses 157.03 

TOTAL PAYMENTS $106,514.91 



Excess of Payments over Receipts for year 

ending December 31, 1944 $ 5,088.14 



CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 

To the Officers and Trustees of the Infants'' Hospital: 

We have made an examination of the financial books and records 
of the Infants' Hospital for the year ended December 31, 1944. 

We satisfied ourselves that all recorded cash receipts were de- 
posited in the bank, and we examined cancelled checks for all disburse- 
ments. We verified the balance of cash in bank by a certificate from 
the depository. 

On January 12, 1945, we inspected the securities held in the 
General and Restricted Funds. There were no changes in the list 
between December 31, 1944, and the date of our count. 

In our opinion, based on such examination, the accompanying 
statement of assets and liabilities and of income and expense present 
fairly the financial condition of the hospital at December 31, 1944, 
and the results of its operations for the year then ended. 



Boston, Massachusetts 
March 20, 1945. 



Charles F. Rittenhouse & Company 
Certified Public Accountants 



{19} 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE PERMANENT FUND 

December 31, 1944 

Par Book 

BONDS Due Rate Value Value 

Central Pacific Railway Company 1949 4 $ 5,000.00 $ 5,012.50 

Central of Georgia Railway Company. . . . 1959 5 10,000.00 5,000.00 

Chicago & Western Indiana Railroad".. . . 1952 4 10,000.00 9,675.00 

Cities Service Company, Deb 1969 5 10,000.00 10,412.50 

Columbia Gas & Electric Company 1961 5 5.000.00 5,175.00 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Associates 1956 4 10,000.00 9,650.00 

Great Northern Railway Company 1973 5 10,000.00 9,250.00 

Kentucky Utilities 1970 4 10,000.00 10,450.00 

Lawyers Mortgage Investment Corp. of 

Boston, Series A-l 1945 10,000.00 649.76 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Co 2003 43^ 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Minnesota Power & Light Company 1978 AY 2 8,000.00 8,321.23 

Monongahela Railway Company 1966 3V( 10,000.00 10,250.00 

Montana Power Company . 1966 3% 10,000.00 9,491.35 

New York Central & Hudson River Rail- 
road Company . 1998 3V 2 5,000.00 4,800.00 

New York Central & Hudson River Rail- 
road Company 1997 3}/ 2 5,000.00 4,400.00 

New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, 

Ref., Series E 1978 4 V 8,000.00 5,070.00 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. . 1948 6 2,500.00 2,462.74 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. . 1947 4 6,000.00 6,480.00 

Northern States Power Company 1967 2>V 2 10,000.00 9,537.50 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company 1970 3% 10,000.00 9,800.00 

Queensboro Gas & Electric 1952 5^ 10,000.00 10,450.00 

Texas & Pacific Railway Company 1977 5 5,000.00 3,500.00 

Texas & Pacific Railroad ■ 1979 5 5,000.00 5,000.00 

U. S. Treasury Series G 1954 2.]/ 2 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Wabash Railroad Company 1991 4^ 1,800.00 540.00 



Total Bonds $186,300.00 $165,377.58 



STOCKS No. of Shares 

Allied Chemical and Dye 35 $ 5,683.13 

Aluminum Company of America, Pfd. 6% * 100 10,712.50 

Boston & Albany R.R. Co., Common 15 3,070.00 

Boston Edison Company 400 15,981.95 

Chemical Bank and Trust Company 100 4,825.00 

Duquesne Light Company, Pfd. 5%. ...... 100 9,750.00 

Guaranty Trust Company of New York. . 17 5,304.00 

Kennecott Copper Company, Common. . . 150 5,590.20 

Liggett and Myers 60 5,280.00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co. . 25 2,398.34 

New Hampshire Fire Insurance Co 110 4,840.00 

Pennsylvania Railroad Co., Common/ 200 10,000.00 

Quincy Market Cold Storage Co., Pfd 16 1,600.00 

Southwestern Public Service, Pfd 100 11,000.00 

Standard Oil Company of Ohio, Pfd 100 10,300.00 

Union Pacific Railroad Co., Common 25 3,000.00 

Wabash Railroad Company, 4V 2 % Pfd.... 45 990.00 

Total Stocks $110,325.12 

Total Permanent Fund Investments $275,702.70 

•{20 > 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE GENERAL FUND 



December 31, 1944 

BONDS Due Rate 

Arkansas Power and Light Company 1974 33^ 

Boston & Albany Railroad 1952 3^ 

Boston & Maine Railroad — 1st Mortgage. 1955 5 

Boston & Maine Railroad— 1st Mortgage. 1960 4 
Boston & Maine Railroad — Income Bonds 1970 4^ 

Brooklyn Union Gas, Deb 1969 4 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad.. . 1974 S% 

Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad . . . 1952 4 

Cincinnati Union Terminal 1974 2% 

Columbia Gas & Electric Corporation .... 1961 5 

Florida Power & Light, Deb 1979 4% 

International Paper Company 1955 6 

New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad. 1978 4 l / 2 

New York Steam 1963 S l / 2 

Puget Sound Power & Light 1972 4^ 

Safe Harbor Water Power Corporation . . . 1979 43^ 

Saguenay Power Company, Ltd 1966 434 

Shawinigan Water & Power Company ... . 1967 4 3^2 

Southern Railway Company 1956 6 

U. S. Treasury Bonds, Series AG 1964 -69 23^ 

Western Maryland Railway 1977 534 

Total Bonds 



Par 

Value 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

3,200.00 

8,000.00 

10,000.00 

15,000.00 

5,000.00 

12,000.00 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

8,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

14,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 



Book 

Value 

$ 10,350.00 

10,200.00 
4,625.00 
3,200.00 
7,505.00 

10,437.50 

15,112.50 
5,212.50 

12,222.00 
5,219.62 

10,700.00 
7,971.32 
4,062.50 
5,362.50 

14,595.00 
9,691.25 

10,000.00 
6,196.95 
9,650.00 
5,000.00 
4,987.50 



$175,200.00 $172,301.14 



STOCKS No. of Shares 

American Telephone & Telegraph Company 117 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 30 

Dayton Power & Light, 4^% Pfd 50 

Draper Corporation 875 

E. I. DuPont de Nemours 35 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Association, 6% Pfd.. 200 

First National Bank of Boston 250 

First National Bank of New York 7 

General Electric Common 800 

General Motors Corporation, 5% Pfd 100 

Great American Insurance Co., Common.. 340 

Nashua Manufacturing Co., Pfd. Stock. . . 100 

Nashua Manufacturing Co.— 2nd Pfd 100 

National Fire Insurance Company 85 

Norfolk & Western Railroad, Common ... 25 

Pacific Gas & Electric . ". 200 

Phillips Petroleum 125 

Phoenix Insurance Company 60 

Public Service Co. of Colorado, 7% Pfd. . . 50 

Saco-Lowell Shops, Common 150 

Saco-Lowell Shops, 7% Common 150 

Southern Pacific Railroad, Common. 200 

Standard Oil of New Jersey 125 

Union Pacific Railroad, Common 94 

United Fruit Company, Common 100 

United States Steel Company, Common . . 100 

Western Pennsylvania Power, 43^% Pfd.. 50 

Total Stocks 

Total General Fund Investments. 

<21> 



$ 21,692.27 

2,040.00 

5,450.00 

47,673.75 

5,285.00 

18,600.00 

11,921.88 

10,925.00 

29,600.00 

12,025.26 

9,915.50 

6,000.00 

4,100.00 

5,121.25 

5,025.00 

5,075.00 

5,711.15 

5,580.00 

5,550.00 

1,000.00 

4,000.00 

8,200.00 

5,093.04 

9,329.50 

8,020.20 

10,000.00 

5,362.50 

$268,296.30 

$440,597.44 



MEMBERS OF CORPORATION 



Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Ames, Mrs. John S., Jr. 
Anderson, Mrs. Larz 



Bacon, Mrs. William Benjamin 
Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 
Bartlett, Nelson S., Jr. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Nelson S., Jr. 
Baylies, Lincoln 
Beale, Arthur M. 
Bell, Mrs. Stoughton 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward L. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A. 
Bradley, Mrs. J. Gardner 
Bremer, Mrs. Theodore G. 
Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Chapin, Mrs. John R. 
Clark, Mrs. R. J. 
Converse, Miss E. N. 
Crowninshield, Mrs. F. B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Allen 
Curtis, Mrs. E. R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 



Dane, Mrs. Ernest B., Jr. 
DeForde, Miss Alice 
Derby, Hasket 
Devens, Charles 



Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 



Forbes, F. Murray 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 



Hall, Mrs. John L. 
Hall, John M. 
Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. 
Homans, Mrs. John 
Hovey, Mrs. Charles F. 
Howes, Mrs". Osborne 
Hunnewell, F. W. 

Iasigi, Mrs. Mary V. 
Ide, Miss E. K. 



Jackson, Mrs. James 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Jr. 
Jenckes, Marcien 



Kaufmann, Mrs. Carl F. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Frederick B, 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, II 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M. 

Ladd, Mrs. William E. 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Liggett, Louis K. 
Lovett, Mrs. R. W. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B. 
Meyer, George v. L. 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble 

Nickerson, Mrs. Roland W. 

O'Connell, P. A. 

Palmer, Mrs. Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W. 
Palmer, Mrs. Henry W., Jr. 
Palmer, Henry W., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. F. S. 

Richardson, F. L. W., Jr. 
Richardson, Mrs. Homer B. 
Rotch, Arthur G. 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Rotch, Charles M. 

Sargent, Mrs. S. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Henry R. 
Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. 
Sears, Mrs. Philip S. 
Seymour, Robert W. 
Shaw, S. Parkman, Jr. 
Sheafe, Mrs. William 
Simmons, Mrs. G. W. 
Smith, Dr. Richard M. 
Stillman, Mrs. Carl S. 
Stockton, Mrs. Philip 

Talbot, Mrs. Fritz B. 
Tarbell, Mrs. John F. 
Thacker, Mrs. T. C. 
Tower, Miss E. M. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry 

Warren, Mrs. Fiske 
Warren, Mrs. S. D. 
Webster, Edwin S. 
White, Henry K. 
Windeler, Mrs. G. H. 



•{22 > 



1945 CONTRIBUTIONS 



Anonymous Contributors (39) 
Adams, Miss Ethelind 
Ames, Mr. and Mrs. John S., Jr. 
Amory, Mr. and Mrs. Francis I. 
Aver, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. 



Folsom, Mr. Grenville W. 
Friedman, The Misses 
Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 
Fuller, Mrs. Alvan T. 



Barlow, Miss Mary L. 

Bartol, Dr. and Mrs. John W. 

Beal, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. 

Bemis, Mrs. A. Farwell 

Bigelow, Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 

Blake, Mrs. George B. 

Blake, Mr. and Mrs. G. B., Jr. 

Blumer, Mrs. Thomas S. 

Bowden, Mrs. Herbert L. 

Bradlee, Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. 

Bremer, Miss Sarah F. 

Brown, Mrs. Edwin P. 

Buff, Miss Alice E. 

Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Campbell, Mr. Walter M. 

Cater, John & Co., Inc. 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B. 

Chase, Miss Alice P. 

Children's Hospital Employees 

Clark, Dr. and Mrs. George O. 

Clark, Lt. and Mrs. Nathaniel T. 

Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. 

Colby Memorial Trust 

Committee of Permanent Charity Fund 

Converse, Miss Eliza Nott 

Countway, Francis A. 

Crowninshield, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. 

Curtis, Mrs. F. G. 

Curtis, Mrs. Louis, Sr. 

Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 



Dane, Mrs. John 
Dean Welfare Trust 
Dearborn, Mr. and Mrs. F. 



M., Jr. 



Elliot, Mr. and Mrs. John M. 
Emery, Mrs. Forrest 
Emmons, Mrs. Robert W., Jr. 

Falvey, Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Faulkner, Mrs. James M. 
Fay, Eugene F. Estate 
Federal Employees Group 
Fegan, Mrs. William Jay 
Fisher, Mrs. Richard T. 
Flagg, Dr. and Mrs. Elisha 



Goodrich, Mrs. Wallace 
Grandin, Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald 
Grew, Mr. Edward W. 
Grew, Mrs. Edward W. 
Grosberg Family Charity Fund 

Hall, Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Halsey, Mrs. Martha Fuller 
Hanington, Miss Elizabeth F. 
Hasenfus, Mr. Nathaniel J. 
Herman, Mrs. Joseph M. 
Hersey, Miss Ada H. 
Hoag, Mrs. Charles R. 
Houghton, Mrs. Clement S. 
Hovey, Mrs. Chandler 
Howe, Mr. James C. 
Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. 
Hunnewell, Mr. James M. 



Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 
Jenkins Brothers 



Kimball, Mrs. Benjamin P. 
King, Mr. and Mrs. Gelston T. 
Klopot, Mr. Abraham 

Ladies' Aid Committee 
Lane, Mrs. Gardiner M. 
Leland, Miss Elizabeth C. 
Leland, Mr. Joseph D. 
Leland, Miss Luisita 
Lever Brothers Company 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Little, Mrs. Leon M. 
Loring, Mr. and Mrs. Caleb 
Loring, Miss Marjorie C. 
Lyman, Mrs. Henry 
Lyman, Mrs. Herbert 
Lyman, Mr. Ronald T. 
Lyman, Mr. Theodore 

Mahady, E. F. Company 
Meigs, Mrs. Martin S. 
Merrill, Mrs. Luther M. 
Moore, Mrs. Edward C. 



•{23} 



Moors, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. 
Morse, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. 
Moseley, Mrs. F. S. 



N. E. Power Association & Affiliated 

Co. Employees 
Newman, Mrs. Samuel J. 



Parker, Mr. and Mrs. William Amory 

Peavy, Mrs. Leopold 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T. 

Phelan, Mrs. James J. 

Pickman, Mr. and Mrs. Dudley L. 

Pokat Printing Company 



Sanderson, E. L. 

Sayles, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W, 

Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. 

Slattery, E. T. Company 

Slayton, Miss Maud S. 

Smith, Mrs. Charles L. 

Smith, Miss Ida C. 

Spaulding, Mr. John T. 

State Employe Group 

Steinert, Mrs. Alexander 

Stockton, Mr. and Mrs. Charles H, 

Sullivan, Miss Mary G. 

Swift, Mr. and Mrs. George H. 

Thomas, Miss Helen 
Travelli, Charles Irwin Fund 
Tuckerman, Mrs. Sears 



Rantoul, Mrs. Neal 
Ratshesky, Mrs. Theresa S. 
Reed, Miss Emily S. 
Rice, Harry L. 
Richardson, Mrs. H. B. 
Riley, Miss Mabel Louise 
Rothwell, Mr. James Mason 



Warren, Mrs. Samuel D. 

Watters, Mrs. Walter F. 

Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. William, Jr. 

Whitney, Rev. Arthur B. 

Wiggin, Maude L. 

Winthrop, Miss Clara B. 

Wyzanski, M. E. 



{24} 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation: 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL 




SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



For the Year 1945 



SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

194 5 

INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 



Since 1881 the Infants" Hospital has provided medical 
treatment for infants without regard to race, creed, color 
or residence. 

Our Research Studies and training and experience given 
to Doctors , Medical Students and Nurses may some day 

SAVE THE BABY IN YOUR OWN HOME. 



WHAT YOUR DOLLARS GIVE 

Light, heat, food, nurses and doctors for one baby 

for . . . 

One day costs $8.44 

Seven days cost $59.08 

One month costs $253.20 

$6000 endows a memorial bed in perpetuity. 




{2} 



REPORT OF THE PHYSICIAN-IN-CHIEF 



PHE most important event occurring in 1945 in connection with 
-*• the work of the Infants' Hospital has been the return to active 
duty of many members of the staff who have been in military service. 
The struggles of the last years to maintain the care of the patients 
and teaching responsibilities at the high level which has always been 
obtained in the work of the Infants' Hospital will be greatly reduced 
by the resumption of duties by these men. We have missed them 
during their years of absence and welcome them back with enthusiasm. 

The intern and resident situation which has been under rigid 
control by the War Manpower Commission has been relieved some- 
what during the year by their allowing additional personnel to be 
appointed from the ranks of the returning veterans. We hope that, 
with the removal of all restrictions of appointments which will take 
place in the year 1946, we shall be able before long to return to a 
system of staggered appointments and longer services. Considering 
the accelerated educational program and the rapidity with which 
interns had to be replaced and their short term of service, the quality 
of their work has been surprisingly good. 

Arrangements are in progress to provide a better physical set-up 
for the care of premature infants. At the present time the premature 
infants are scattered over three separate rooms and admission to these 
rooms is in direct contact with the general ward. Scattered location 
and distribution makes it almost impossible to maintain any isolation 
of these infants from contacts with personnel, many of whom are 
either ill with diseases which are transmissible by direct contact or 
personnel who may harbor infectious organisms in the secretions of 
their respiratory tract. We hope to centralize all the facilities for the 
care of premature infants on a single floor and to be able to separate 
this unit from contact with the rest of the ward. This has necessitated 
moving the laboratory from the second to the first floor and this move 
has been accomplished. The laboratory is now in what was formerly 
the record librarian's room. Miss Lowden who has served faithfully 
as record librarian for many years has terminated her services to the 
Hospital and the record room will be combined with the record room 
of The Children's Hospital, thus releasing the room for laboratory 
purposes. 

{3} 



There have been no unusual epidemics among the patients but 
we still are inadequately protected against the possibility of cross- 
infections. This problem deserves careful study, not only for the 
protection of our present Hospital personnel but in relation to the 
construction of the wards of the new Infants' Hospital. It is hoped 
that this problem may be given intensive study during the next year. 

Investigations have gone forward particularly in relation to 
children with pancreatic fibrosis and the disturbances of water and 
electrolyte balance. 

Miss Mary Chapman has continued to demonstrate her efficiency 
in directing the work of the Hospital and the rest of the nursing staff 
have carried out their duties effectively, often in the face of inadequate 
assistance. The nurses aids and volunteers have continued to render 
valuable assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

{signed) Richard M. Smith, M.D., 

Physician-in-Chief 



{4> 




MEDICAL STATISTICS 

Number of patients remaining in the hospital 

December 31, 1944 36 

Number of patients admitted during the year 1945. . 937 

Number of patients discharged during the year 1945. 935 7 

Number of patients remaining in the hospital 

December 31, 1945 38 

i < 973 vc 973 jvo 

Number of patients— weekly rate— $28.00 to $37.50. 

Number of patients— weekly rate— $28.00 532 

Number of patients — reduced rate per week — 75c to 

$28.00. 387 

Number of patients — free 18 

Total number of hospital days 14,065 

Average number of patients daily 38 + 

Average days' stay 15 + 

DISCHARGED 

Relieved 675 

Unrelieved 37 

Transferred to other hospitals 53 

Discharged on parents' own responsibility or against 

Advice 1 

Died 169 (18.0%) 

Total " 935- q 3} 

51 died in a few hours 
20 died in less than 24 hours 
18 died in less than 48 hours 
52.6% died in less than 48 hours 

Henry M. Pollock, Acting Director 

{5} 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 



pHE shortage of nursing and other personnel became still more 
-*■ acute in 1945; yet the Infants' Hospital remained filled to near 
capacity. 

Plans for the new Children's Hospital, in which the Infants' 
Hospital will share, are going ahead rapidly, and it was not felt ad- 
visable to do much more in the matter of maintenance of the present 
building than was absolutely necessary. While nothing was left 
undone that was necessary for the care of the patient, much was to 
be # desired in the appearance of the building. Steps were taken to 
rearrange and improve the Premature Nursery for greater control of 
infectious diarrhea in the summer months. 

All at the Infants' Hospital regretted the decision of George v. L. 
Meyer to resign in June as Director after many years of service. 
Henry M. Pollock, who had been engaged as Consultant on Building 
Plans for The Children's Hospital, continued as Director with the 
assistance of George S. Lawler as Business Administrator until the 
new Director took office in January of 1946. 

All are most anxious to move into new quarters in the proposed 
Children's Hospital, but until then the many problems created by 
the old building and war-caused shortages will be handled as they 
appear. 

Much credit is due the Staff, nurses, housekeeping department, 
culinary department, and all others, for their loyalty and devotion in 
carrying on while heavily overburdened during this most trying 
period. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henry M. Pollock, M.D., 

Acting Director 

46} 





msmm 




in 



REPORT OF NURSING SERVICE 



^\URING the past year 351 students received a month's experience 
*-^ in the Infants' Hospital as part of their clinical experience in 
nursing. Of this group forty-nine were Children's Hospital students 
and the others were from affiliating schools. 

The illness record for the year is as follows: 
Average number of students off duty daily for illness 

or leave of absence following illness 1.5 

Total days of illness for graduate staff 56 

Total days of leave of absence following illness for 

graduate staff 54 

The nursing shortage still exists. At the end of the year we have 
a vacancy in the Milk Laboratory, since the nurse in charge has been 
transferred to the position of head nurse on the lower floor, and one 
in the Treatment Room. 

The number of general staff nurses or general duty nurses, that 
is, those who assist with the bedside nursing for The Children's and 
Infants' Hospitals before the war was thirty-nine. Never during 
the past year have we had even the number which were on the Private 
Ward of The Children's Hospital before the war, and the small group 
had to be divided between Private Ward, Infants' Hospital and all the 
wards of The Children's Hospital for the twenty-four-hour service. 
Service needs have been covered by part-time personnel and student 
nurses. In spite of the general nursing shortage at no time has any 
portion of the Infants' Hospital been closed. 

A comparison of treatments for the years 1941, the last prewar 
year, and 1945 is ample evidence of the increasing amount of nursing 
service needed in the Infants' Hospital. 

1941 1945 
Intravenous injections 586 1014 

Hypodermoclyses 396 937 

Constant intravenous 155 133 

Transfusions 569 453 

The use of penicillin with its frequent administration by hypo- 
dermic is also a striking example of a time-consuming treatment 
which is required in the Hospital today. On the day this report is 
written twenty-one patients in the Infants' Hospital, out of a total 

<8> 



of thirty-two patients, exclusive of prematures, are having penicillin 
every three hours. 

Other types of service, which in normal times are cared for by 
other groups, have become services rendered by nurses. The all- 
year program for medical education has also increased the demands 
on the nursing service. All of these factors, patient care, medical 
education and. nursing education, tie in. Good nursing service is 
needed for patients and is a necessary complement to good medical 
education, and good nursing service is the outgrowth of a good pro- 
gram in nursing education, and sufficient graduate nurse and auxiliary 
service to supplement student nurse service. 

At the beginning of the year a follow-up service for premature 
babies returning home was instituted. Prior to the discharge of the 
baby a form is sent to the School of Nursing Office for referral to the 
City of Boston Health Department in the Boston area, or to a Visiting 
Nurse Association in the outlying communities, asking that home 
conditions be reviewed and the mother prepared for the baby's return. 
A report on the conditions comes back to the Supervisor of the Infants' 
Hospital. When the child is actually discharged another form is sent 
to the agency giving the doctor's orders for the baby. 

Again, as in previous reports, we stress the importance of having 
a graduate nurse during the twenty-four hour service in the Premature 
Nursery. With the opening of the new Premature Nursery we hope 
that provision will be made in the budget for such service. We also 
hope that the supply of nurses will be such that nurses may be obtained. 

One cannot close this report without expressing deep appreciation 
of the loyal spirit in which graduate nurses and student nurses alike 
accepted the added responsibilities and met the demands made upon 
them during all of the war years. 

We appreciate greatly, also, the contribution which has been made 
by the graduates of this and other schools who came in for part-time 
work. The volunteer service, which has been given both by the Red 
Cross Nurse's Aides and by the War Service Committee, has been 
efficient and effective, and we are grateful to each volunteer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

{signed) Stella Goostray, 
Director, Nursing Service 



m 



REPORT OF SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



T 



HE total number of cases referred to Social Service in 1945 was 
136. Of these cases, 5 had congenital lues, 17 were premature 
babies, 27 had nutritional disorders, 35 were cases of hopeless mental 
retardation or chronic physical disability, and the remaining 52 cases 
presented various other medical problems. 

We are glad to report that the plan described in the last year's 
Annual Report for one hundred per cent investigation of the homes of 
all premature babies, prior to discharge, has been in effect during this 
year. The Public Health Nursing Association in Boston and the 
Visiting Nurse Association in the outlying districts have made a 
preliminary home visit while the baby was still in the Hospital and a 
follow-up visit after his return home. These nursing organizations 
were prompt in sending in reports, so that in the cases where it seemed 
advisable for the Infants' Hospital social worker to make further 
social investigation and planning, adequate time was available before 
the patient's discharge. Of the 103 premature babies admitted to the 
Hospital in 1945, 42 were discharged to their own homes and benefitted 
by this plan. Of this number 17 required further social service 
consideration. 

In the cases of congenital lues, it has been the responsibility of 
the social worker to know the family, and be sure that the parents 
are either under treatment, or that treatment is initiated, if necessary. 

As in 1944, the group of children with chronic mental and physical 
conditions continued to present a difficult problem for the social 
worker, as there are still inadequate resources in the community for 
the care of these patients. 

In the group of 52 cases with various medical problems, the 
social worker- contributed in several different ways. She was asked 
to make home visits to determine the environmental and emotional 
factors which might have contributed to the disease and to reassure 
and encourage the parents when the treatment and the course of the 
disease was prolonged. 

The 27 cases of nutritional disorders were of particular interest, 
as they presented problems which could often be relieved by the co- 
operation of both nurse and social worker. Because we have seen, 



during the year, so many babies where a feeding difficulty was the 
basis of the disorder, Miss Mary Chapman, Supervisor of Nurses in 
Infants' Hospital, and the social worker, acted in close co-operation. 
In planning for the home care and follow-up of these cases, the mother 
was encouraged to visit and feed the baby while the child was still 
in the Hospital. Miss Chapman gave generously of her time to ex- 
plain to the parent individual feeding techniques, as they applied to 
the needs of the particular baby, and upon discharge the social worker 
made repeated follow-up visits in an attempt to further evaluate social 
factors which seemed to bear on the problem, and to encourage and 
support the mother. The doctors have been interested in this pro- 
gram and have co-operated in making it possible. 

Another problem which came to the attention of the social worker 
in the course of the year was the isolation of parents from the hos- 
pitalized infant, because of the distance involved. Since the Infants' 
Hospital serves the entire New England area, many of the patients 
came from outlying districts. This made it hard for parents to visit 
and to keep in contact with the doctor. In these cases, the worker 
tried to keep in touch with the families through correspondence and 
found that personal letters from time to time served as a great source 
of comfort. 

Making ward rounds with the doctors and nurses at least once 
a week was an integral part of the social worker's routine. It was 
frequently at this time that cases were referred to the worker and 
plans for after care discussed. The work of the Social Service Depart- 
ment of the Infants' Hospital has been done on a part-time basis. 
This arrangement has been apparently satisfactory to the nursing 
and medical staff, and from the point of view of adequately covering 
the social service problems. It would be interesting, especially in 
cases of nutritional disturbances, to make more complete social studies 
from the point of view of environmental and emotional factors. Such 
a project, however, would require more time than the five, one-half 
days a week the worker is now able to give. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elizabeth Snedeker, 
Social Worker, Infants' Hospital 



{n} 



REPORT OF THE BUILDING MAINTENANCE 

COMMITTEE 



A FTER two conferences with Dr. Pollock and Mr. Rotch it has 
■*■ *- been decided that it is very necessary to make some alterations 
in the Premature Wards of the Infants' Hospital. Due to the proxim- 
ity of the present ward to the main hall the danger of summer infec- 
tions is very great. 

Mr. Rotch and Mrs. Warren went out January 25, 1946 to see 
how far the improvements have progressed since the autumn when 
there was the first conference. 

The laboratory has been moved to the front of the building on 
the left as you enter in the small Helen Rotch Memorial Room. It 
seems to be proving adequate and a cheerful room to work in. The 
ward floor has now been cleared to start the work of isolating the 
back section of the main building with a glass partition and making 
three separate wards with varying degrees of heat and humidity for 
premature cases. The general alterations also include two treatment 
rooms. One room will have four incubators of the newest design, 
recommended by Dr. Branch, which will be removed to the new 
hospital when completed. These plans are somewhat confusing as 
they involve a certain amount of changing around temporarily, but 
when completed it is hoped will be a great improvement in the work- 
ing conditions and the safety of the patients. The total cost of these 
improvements should be between $5,000 and $6,000. 

At the moment the hospital is badly in need of cleaning. Needless 
to say painting would be still better. It looks very shabby and must 
be quite distressing to work in. It is now becoming easier to get 
painters and it is hoped that it will not be long before Dr. Branch 
can see his way clear to starting the work very badly needed in the 
Infants' Hospital. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(signed) Helen T. Warren 



{ 12} 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS FOR 1945 



President 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH 

137 Marlboro Street 

Secretary 

JOHN M. HALL 

30 State Street 

Treasurer 
LINCOLN BAYLIES 

441 Stuart Street 

Assistant Secretary and Treasurer 

CHARLES M. ROTCH 

30 State Street 



DIRECTORS 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 

Mrs. William Benjamin Bacon 

Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 

Lincoln Baylies 

Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 

Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 

Hasket Derby 

Charles Devens 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

Mrs. Thomas B. Gannett 

John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 

Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 

Marcien Jenckes 

Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 



Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George v. L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. Theodore Sturdevant 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Henry K. White 



Lincoln Baylies 



Finance Committee 
Charles M. Rotch 



Henry K. White 



Hospital Director 
Charles F. Branch, M.D. 



Physician-in- Ch ief 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 



Superintendent of Nurses 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



{13} 



ACTIVE STAFF 



THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. — Physician-in-Chief 

Visiting Physicians 
Bronson Crothers, M.D. Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. Charles A. Janeway, M.D. 

Louis K. Diamond, M.D. Clement A. Smith, M.D. 

James L. Gamble, M.D. Harold C Stuart, M.D. 

William G. Lennox, M.D. Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Physicians 

Olga E. Allers, M.D. Henry E. Gallup, M.D. 

William Berenberg, M.D. Charles D. May, M.D. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. Dorothea M. Moore, M.D. 

Stewart H. Clifford, M.D. Edward L. Pratt, M.D. 

R. Canon Eley, M.D. Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 

Alfred T. Shohl, M.D. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 
William E. Ladd, M.D. — Surgeon-in-Chiei" 

Visiting Surgeons 
Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 
Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. (Neurosurgery) 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. (Otolaryngology) 
Associate Visiting Surgeons Assistant Surgeon 

George D. Cutler, M.D. John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 

Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 

Robert E. Gross, M.D. Visiting Otolaryngologist 

Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 
Associate Surgeons 

Henry W. Hudson, M.D. Associate Visiting Otolaryngologists 

Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

Augustus Thorndike, M.D. Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Research Associate in Otolaryngology 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. —Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 
Orthopedic Surgeon Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons 

James W. Sever, M.D. A. H. Brewster, M.D. 

William T. Green, M.D. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. — Pathologist-in-Chief 

Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 
Director, Chemistry Laboratory Bacteriologist 

James L. Gamble, M.D. * John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Roentgenologist — Edward B. D. Neuhauser, M.D. 
Dermatologist — E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 
Ophthalmologist — J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 
Stomatologist— Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 
Social Service — Miss Marion Hall 

{14} 



LADIES' AID OFFICERS FOR 1946 



Chairman 
MRS. WILLIAM BENJAMIN BACON 

Vice Chairman 
MRS. HENRY L. MASON 

Second Vice Chairman 
MRS. GEORGE BATY BLAKE, JR. 

Third Vice Chairman 
MRS. CHANDLER HOVEY, JR. 

Treasurer 
MRS. JOHN GARDINER 

Assistant Treasurer 
MRS. F. SKIDDY von STADE 

Secretary 
MRS. THOMAS B. GANNETT 

A ssistant Secretary 
MRS. ROGER CUTLER 

MRS. JOHN H. GARDINER, Treasurer 
January 1, 1945 to January 1, 1946 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

RECEIPTS 

Balanceon hand January 1, 19,45 665.93 

Dues 815.00 

Donations 506.50 

Profits from Coca Cola machine ' 9.93 

Profits from Yankee Trading Post 128.50 



$2,125.86 

PAYMENTS 

Bed for the year. $600.00 

Postage and printing 41.37 

Bank service charges . . . ' .96 

Toys 9.36 

Welfare Committee 14.13 

665.82 

Balance January 1, 1946 1,460.04 



$2,125.86 



{15} 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE— ANNUAL REPORT 



~^\URING the past year, the Ladies' Aid Committee took stock 
-*— * of their function as a part of the hospital at large, and the means 
at their disposal with which to meet these needs. A questionnaire 
sent out in March revealed that many members heretofore considered 
as "active" preferred merely to send dues. With only about thirty 
members willing to take an active part, the committee arranged to 
experiment during 1946 in working actively with the Welfare Com- 
mittee of The Children's Hospital along the lines of raising money and 
volunteer effort. The list of dues-paying members would remain the 
same, and so, it was hoped that the hospital would gain by having a 
share in various charity undertakings initiated by the Welfare Com- 
mittee. 

It is worth noting that this step was taken after four years of war, 
and it is possible that it may not be suitable to present conditions. 
However, in view of the way in which The Children's and Infants' 
Hospitals work together, it seems reasonable to have the charity 
committees representing them equally co-ordinated. 

The committee did participate in The Yankee Trading Post, on 
a restricted basis, and the only partial success of this method of co- 
operation was one of the factors which led to the adoption of the joint 
membership with the Welfare. 

A free bed was donated to the hospital for the use, wherever 
possible, of the child of a serviceman. 

There has been one new member, five resignations, and ten 
members were dropped for not paying dues. 

Respectfully submitted, 

{signed) Sarita B. Kellogg, 

Secretary 



{16} 



LADIES' AID COMMITTEE 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 
Mrs. Timothee Adamowski 

Charles F. Adams, Jr. 

George D. Aldrich 

David Ames 

John S. Ames, Jr. 

Francis I. Amory 

Roger Amory 

William Benjamin Bacon 

Talbot Baker 
Mrs. James O. Bangs 
Mrs. B. Devereux Barker 
Mrs. B. Devereux Barker, Jr. 
Mrs. Thomas P. Beal 
Mrs. William DeFord Beal 
Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 
Mrs. George Baty Blake 
Mrs. John A. Blanchard 
Mrs. Thomas S. Blumer 
Mrs. Thomas W. Botsford 
Mrs. Cameron Bradley, Jr. 
***Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley 
Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 
Mrs. Davenport Brown 
Mrs. Theodore Brown 
Mrs. Frederick M. Burn ham 
Miss Nina Burnham 
Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 
Mrs. Samuel Cabot 
Mrs. George Cary 
Mrs. Ephron Catlin, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles E. Channing 
Mrs. Theodore Chase 
Mrs. Frederick C. Church 
Mrs. Forrester A. Clark 
Mrs. Henry C. Clark 
Mrs. Nathaniel T. Clark 

Robert J. Clark 

Sargent F. Collier 
Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 
Mrs. T. Jefferson Coolidge, Jr. 

Taylor Crowninshield 

Charles C. Cunningham 

Eric Cutler 

George C. Cutler, Jr. 

Roger W. Cutler 

Roger W. Cutler, Jr. 
Mrs. Roger Damon 
Mrs. B. Welch Dane 
Mrs. Richard E. Danielson 
Mrs. John A. V. Davies 
Mrs. Frederick M. Dearborn, Jr. 
Mrs. George P. Denny 
Mrs. Charles Devens 
Mrs. David W. Devens 
Mrs. J. Lindsay Dexter 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 



Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 



Mrs. William Dexter 

Mrs. Frederick W. Eaton 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

Mrs. Robert W. Emmons, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert M. Faxon 

Mrs. William S. Febiger 

Mrs. John G. Flint 

Mrs. Lawrence Foster 

Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 

Mrs. Claude Fuess 

Mrs. James L. Gamble 

Mrs. John D. Gannett 

Mrs. Thomas B. Gannett 

Mrs. John H. Gardiner 

Mrs. G. Peabody Gardner, Jr. 

Mrs. Harrison Gardner 

Mrs. John W. Goodrich 

Mrs. Wallace Goodrich 

Mrs. Patrick Grant 

Mrs. Francis C. Gray 

Mrs. Henry V. Greenough 

Mrs. James C. Greenway, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry S. Grew 

Mrs. Brinley Hall 

Mrs. John L. Hall 

Mrs. John M. Hall 

Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 

Mrs. Paul M. Hamlen 

Mrs. Huntington R. Hardwick 

Mrs. Richard Harte 

Mrs. Andrew H. Hepburn 

Mrs. Christian A. Herter 

Mrs. Francis S. Hill 

Mrs. Amor Hollingsworth, Jr. 

Mrs. Chand er Hovey, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 

Mrs. James M. Hunnewell 

Mrs. Benjamin L. Huntington 

Mrs. G. Newell Hurd 

Mrs. Mark R. Jouett 

Mrs. Edmund S. Kelley, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederic B. Kellogg 

Mrs. William T. Kemble 

Mrs. Wisner Kenne 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder, 2nd 

Mrs. Franklin C. King 

Mrs. Gelston T. King 

Mrs. Alexander H. Ladd, Jr. 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence 

Miss Luisita Leland 

Mrs. John L. Lyman 

Mrs. William DeFord Manice, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles E. Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry L. Mason, Jr. 

Mrs. Houghton Metcalf 



{17} 



Mrs. Charles G. Mixter, Jr. 

Mrs. Sherman Morss 

Mrs. J. Lothrop Motley 

Mrs. Robert S. Myers 

Mrs. Harris J. Nelson 

Mrs. Hamilton Osgood 

Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 

Mrs. Augustin H. Parker, Jr. 

Mrs. Francis S. Parker 

Mrs. William A. Parker 

Mrs. John F. Perkins, Jr. 

Mrs. Thomas N. Perkins 

Mrs. Carleton Pike 

Mrs. Arnold Porter 

Mrs. Brooks Potter 

Mrs. George Putnam 

Mrs. Winthrop Pyemont 

Mrs. Eugene E. Record 

Mrs. Lawrence L. Reeve 

Mrs. Charles F. Richardson 

Mrs. Frederick L. W. Richardson, Jr. 

Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 

Mrs. Joseph P. Richardson 

Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 

Mrs. Renouf Russell, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry B. Sawyer 

Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 

Mrs. Philip S. Sears 

Mrs. Richard D. Sears, Jr. 

Mrs. S. Parkman Shaw 

Mrs. F. Foster Sherburne 

Mrs. Stephen W. Sleeper 

Mrs. William S. Span Id wig 



Mrs. Richard Stackpole 

Miss Faith Stan wood 

Mrs. Malcolm C. Stewart 

Mrs. Philip Stockton 

Mrs. Richard C. Storey 

Mrs. Richard C. Storey, Jr. 

Mrs. George H. Swift 

Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 

Mrs. Nathan Talbot 

Mrs. Thomas C. Thacher 

Mrs. Warren Thayer 

Mrs. Alfred Thomas 

Mrs. Peter Thompson 

Mrs. George Tiffany 

Mrs. John A. Tuckerman 

Mrs. Sears Tuckerman 

Mrs. F. Skiddy Von Stade, Jr. 

Mrs. Bayard Warren 

***Mrs. George E. Warren 

Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 

Mrs. Donald C. Watson 

Mrs. Roger Weed 

Mrs. George S. Weld 

Mrs. PhilipS. Weld 

Mrs. Howard S. Whiteside 

Mrs. Edward Allen Whitney 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 

Mrs. Francis W. Willett 

Mrs. Nathaniel T. Winthrop 

Mrs. Roger Wolcott 

Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr. 



Honorary Members 



{IS} 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



LINCOLN BAYLIES, TREASURER 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1945 



ASSETS 

Assets of General Fund: 

Cash in bank $ 19,447.05 

Accounts receivable 8,149.98 

Investments at cost or at estimated market value 
at time of acquisition: 

Bonds and stocks (Market value $530,698). . . . 470,913.85 



Assets of Restricted Funds: 

Investments at cost or at estimated market value 
at time of acquisition: 

Bonds and stocks (Market value $289,976) 272,212.12 

Cash in bank 13,918.21 



$498,510.88 



286,130.33 



Assets of Plant Funds: 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr. Memorial Hospital: 

Building and equipment $145,451.40 

Unexpended cash donated for rearrangement of 

special wards 2,700.00 

$148,151.40 

TOTAL ASSETS $932,792.61 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

General Fund : 

Due to The Children's Hospital for current hospital 

service $ 13,060.57 

Other accounts payable 655.00 

Surplus " 484,795.31 

$498,510.88 

Restricted Funds: 

Principal of restricted funds 286,130.33 

Plant: 

Plant Capital 148,151.40 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL $932,792.61 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1945 

RECEIPTS 

Income: 

Income from hospital care and services: 

Bed and board, patients $ 49,008.25 

Special duty nurses 182.50 

Operations." 1,115.00 

X-rays 3,119.50 

Drugs 2,191.51 

Miscellaneous 2,616.41 

$ 58,233.17 

{19} 



Less : 

Allowances to patients subsequent to ad- 
mission $ 2,171.88 

Accounts written off, net 2,614.31 

4,786.19 

$ 53,446.98 

Income from investments 33,686.56 

Income from trusts, et cetera 399.95 

Donations: 

Greater Boston United War Fund $ 21,705.00 

Other contributions for general purposes 3,195.00 

24,900.00 



TOTAL INCOME $112,433.49 

PAYMENTS 

Expenses: 

Share of expenses billed by the Children's Hospital $118,847.66 

Salaries 1,436.00 

Publicity and advertising 300.61 

Insurance 40.00 

Office rent 180.00 

Miscellaneous 209.00 

TOTAL EXPENSES 121,013.27 

Excess of Expense over Income: 

Year ended December 31, 1945 $ 8,579.78 



CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 

To the Officers and Trustees of the Infants' Hospital: 

We have made an examination of the financial books and records 
of the Infants' Hospital for the year ended December 31, 1945. 

We satisfied ourselves that all recorded cash receipts were de- 
posited in the bank, and we examined cancelled checks for all disburse- 
ments. We verified the balance of cash in bank by a certificate from 
the depository. 

On January 7, 1946, we inspected the investments of the General 
and Restricted Funds, and obtained confirmation from your broker 
for securities in transit. 

In our -opinion, based on such examination, the accompanying 
statement of assets and liabilities and of income and expense present 
fairly the financial condition of the hospital at December 31, 1945, 
and the results of its operations for the year then ended. 

Charles F. Rittenhouse & Company 
Certified Public Accountants 
Boston, Massachusetts 
May 8, 1946. 

•(20 > 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE PERMANENT FUND 

Dcember 31, 1945 

Par Book 

BONDS Due Rate Value Value 

Central Pacific Ry. Co., 1st Ref. Mtg 4% 1949 $ 5,000.00 $ 5,012.50 

Central of Georgia Ry. Co., Ser. C 5 1959 10,000.00 5,000.00 

Chicago and Western Indiana R. R. Co., 

Cons 4 1952 10,000.00 9,675.00 

Cities Service Co., Deb 5 1969 10,000.00 10,412.50 

Columbia Gas & Electric Corp., Deb 5 1961 5,000.00 5,175 00 

Great Northern Ry. Co., Gen'l Mtg. Ser. C 5 1973 10,000.00 9,250.00 

Kentucky Utilities Co., 1st Mtg 4 1970 10,000.00 10,450.00 

Lawyers Mortgage Investment Corp. of 

Boston, Ser. A-l 5 1945 649.76 649.76 

Monongahela Ry. Co., 1st Mtg. Ser. B. . . 334 1966 10,000.00 10,250.00 

Montana Power Co., 1st Mtg 2% 1975 10,000.00 10,100.00 

New York Central & Hudson River R. R. 

Co., Lake Shore Coll. Tr. . . S ] A 1998 5,000.00 4,800.00 

New York Central & Hudson River R. R. 

Co., Mtg V/ 2 1997 5,000.00 4,400.00 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. 

Co., Reg. Conv. Deb 6 1948 2,500.00 2,462.74 

New York, New Haven and Hartford R. R. 

Co., Deb 4 1947 6,000.00 6,480.00 

Public Service Company of Oklahoma, 

1st Mtg 2% 1975 10,000.00 9,950.00 

Queensborough Gas & Electric Co., Deb. 

Ser. A . 5M 1952 10,000.00 10,450.00 

Texas and Pacific Ry. Co., Gen'l Ref., 

Ser. E 3J/ 8 1985 15.000.00 15,018.75 

United States of America Treasury Savings, 

Ser. G 2y 2 1954 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Wabash R.R. Co., Gen'l. Mtg. Inc., Ser. B 4^ 1991 1,800.00 540.00 

Total Bonds $140,949.76 $135,076.25 



STOCKS 

No. of Book 

Shares Value 

210 Aetna Insurance Company $ 11,523.75 

35 Allied Chemical & Dye Corp 5,683.13 

15 Boston & Albany R. R. Co., $100 par 3,070.00 

400 Boston Edison Co 15,981.95 

250 Chemical Bank & Trust Co 10,175.00 

100 Consolidated Edison Company of New York 3,100.00 

100 Duquesne Light Co., 5% Cum. 1st Pfd 9,750.00 

30 Guaranty Trust Company of New York 9,828.00 

150 Kennecott Copper Corp 5,590.20 

100 Liggett & Mevers Tobacco Co 8,730.00 

25 New England'Telephone & Telegraph Co 2,398.34 

200 New Hampshire Fire Insurance Co 9,137.50 

200 Pennsylvania R. R. Co 10,000.00 

100 Southwestern Public Service Co., i%% Cum. Pfd 10,978.00 

100 Union Oil Company of California, $3.75 Cum. Pfd 9,925.00 

25 Union Pacific R. R. Co 3,000.00 

45 Wabash R. R. Co., ±V 2 % Pfd 990.00 

200 Westinghouse Electric Corp 7,275.00 

Total Stocks $137,135.87 

Total Permanent Fund Investments $272,212.12 

{21} 



INVESTMENTS BELONGING TO THE GENERAL FUND 



December 31, 1945 



BONDS 
Arkansas Power & Light Co., 1st Mtg. . . . 

Boston & Albany R. R. Co., Ref 

Boston & Maine R. R., 1st Mtg., Ser. II.. 
Boston & Maine R. R., 1st Mtg., Ser. RR 
Boston & Maine R. R., Inc. Mtg., Ser. A. . 

Brooklyn Union Gas Co., Deb 

Chicago & Western Indiana R. R., Ser. C. 
Cincinnati Union Terminal Co., 1st Mtg., 

Ser. G 

Columbia Gas & Electric Corp., Deb 

Florida Power & Light Co., Deb 

International Paper Co., Ser. A 

New York Power & Light Corp., 1st Mtg. 

New York Steam Corp., 1st Mtg 

Northern Pacific Ry. Co 

Pere Marquette Ry. Co., Ser. D 

Puget Sound Power & Light 

Safe Harbor Water Power Corp., 1st Mtg. 

S.F 

Saguenay Power Co., Ltd., S.F. 1st Mtg., 

Ser. A 

Southern Ry. Co., Ser. A. Gen'l 

Southern Pacific Co., Ser. A 

Telephone Bond and Share Co., Ser. A. . . 
United States of America Treasury 

Total Bonds 



Rate 

Ws v A 

sy 2 

5 

4 

43^ 

4 

4 

2% 
5 

4Ks 

6 

2% 

43^ 

434 



Due 
1974 
1952 
1955 
1960 
1970 
1969 
1952 

1974 
1961 
1979 
1955 
1975 
1963 
1975 
1980 
1972 



VA 1979 



4M 
6 

4K 
5 

23 2 



1966 
1956 
1977 
1958 
1964 



69 



Par 

Value 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

3,200.00 

8,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

12,000.00 
5,000.00 

10,000.00 
8,000.00 

10,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

15,000.00 

14,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 
10,000.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
5,000.00 



Book 
Value 

10,350.00 

10,200.00 
4,625.00 
3,200.00 
7,505.00 

10,437.50 
5,212.50 

12,222.00 
5,219.62 

10,700.00 
7,971.32 

10,200.00 
5,362.50 
5,200.00 

15,018.75 

14,595.00 

9,691.25 

10,000.00 

9,650.00 

15,251.85 

15,187.00 

5,000.00 



No. of 

Shares 

117 

30 
200 

50 

50 
200 
200 

50 
200 
250 
7 
400 
120 
340 
100 
200 
100 

25 
200 
200 

60 

50 
200 
300 
200 
100 
200 
100 
100 

50 



$200,200.00 $202,799.29 

Book 
STOCKS Value 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co $ 21,692.27 



Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. Co. 

Borg- Warner Corp 

Chrysler Corporation 

Dayton Power & Light Co., 43^% Cum. Pfd 

Deere Company 

Draper Corporation - 

DuPont deNemours & Co., E. I 

Eastern Gas & Fuel Associations, 6% Cum. Pfd 

First National Bank of Boston, The 

First National Bank of the City of New York 

General Electric Co 

General Motors Corp 

Great American Insurance Co 

Monongahela Power Co., 4.40% Cum. Pfd 

Montgomery Ward & Co 

Nashua Mfg. Co., 2nd Pfd 

Norfolk & Western Ry. Co 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co 

Phillips Petroleum Co .* 

Phoenix Insurance Co 

Public Service Company of Colorado, 7% Cum. 1st Pfd. 

Public Service Company of Colorado 

Saco-Lowell Shops 

Southern Pacific Co 

Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Co 

Standard Oil Company of New Jersey 

Union Pacific R. R. Co. . 

United Fruit Co 

West Penn Power Co., 43^% Pfd 



2,040.00 

9,300.00 

6,150.00 

5,450.00 

8,800.00 

10,899.75 

7,756.25 

18,600.00 

11,921.88 

10,925.00 

14,800.00 

8,844.64 

9,915.50 

10,350.00 

11,250.00 

3,462.50 

5,025.00 

5,075.00 

9,564.28 

5,580.00 

5,550.00 

6,450.00 

5,000.00 

8,200.00 

12,275.00 

9,686.79 

10,168.00 

8,020.20 

5,362.50 

Total Stocks $268,114.56 

Total General Fund Investments $470,913.85 



{22 } 



MEMBERS OF CORPORATION 



Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Ames, Mrs. John S., Jr. 
Anderson, Mrs. Larz 

Bacon, Mrs. William Benjamin 
Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 
Bartlett, Nelson S., Jr. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Nelson S., Jr. 
Baylies, Lincoln 
Be ale, Arthur M. 
Bell, Mrs. Stoughton 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward L. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A. 
Bradley, Mrs. J. Gardner 
Bremer, Mrs. Theodore G. 
Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Chapin, Mrs. John R. 
Clark, Mrs. R. J. 
Converse, Miss E. N. 
Crowinshield, Mrs. F. B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Allen 
Curtis, Mrs. E. R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 



DeForde, Miss Alice 
Derby, Hasket 
Devens, Charles 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 



Forbes, F. Murray 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 



Hall, Mrs. John L. 
Hall, John M. 
Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Higginson, Mrs. F. L. 
Homans, Mrs. John 
Hovey, Mrs. Charles F. 
Howes, Mrs. Osborne 
Hunnewell, F. W. 

Iasigi, Mrs. Mary V. 
Ide, Miss E. K. 



Jackson, Mrs. James 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Jr. 
Jenckes, Marcien 



Kaufmann, Mrs. Carl F. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Frederick B. 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, II 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M. 

Ladd, Mrs. William E. 
Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Lovett, Mrs. R. W. 

Merriman, Mrs. Roger B. 
Meyer, George v. L. 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble 

Nickerson, Mrs. Roland W. 

O'Connell, P. A. 

Palmer, Mrs. Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W. 
Palmer, Mrs. Henry W., Jr. 
Palmer, Henry W., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. F. S. 

Richardson, F. L. W., Jr. 
Richardson, Mrs. Homer B. 
Rotch, Arthur G. 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Rotch, Charles M. 

Sargent, Mrs. S. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Henry R. 
Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. 
vSears, Mrs. Philip S. 
Seymour, Robert W. 
Shaw, S. Parkman, Jr. 
Sheafe, Mrs. William 
Simmons, Mrs. G. W. 
Smith, Dr. Richard M. 
Stillman, Mrs. Carl S. 
Stockton, Mrs. Philip 
Sturtevant, Mrs. Theodore 

Talbot, Mrs. Fritz B. 
Tarbell, Mrs. John F. 
Thacker, Mrs. T. C. 
Tower, Miss E. M. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry 

Warren, Mrs. Fiske 
Warren, Mrs. S. D. 
Webster, Edwin S. 
White, Henry K. 
Windeler, Mrs. G. H. 



<23 > 



1946 CONTRIBUTIONS 



Anonymous Contributors (26) 

Abbott, Mrs. Gordon 

Abbott, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon, Jr. 

Adams, Miss Ethelind 

Amory, Mr. and Mrs. Francis I. 



Barbour, Miss Julia A. 

Barlow, Miss Mary L. 

Bartol, Dr. and Mrs. John W. 

Bayley, James C., Jr. 

Bayley, Mrs. James C. 

Bellamy, Miss Margaret B. 

Bemis, Mrs. A. Farwell 

Blake, Mr. and Mrs. G. B., Jr. 

Bowden, Mrs. Herbert L. 

Bradlee, Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. 

Brambilla, Donna Julia M. 

Bremer, Miss Sarah F. 

Brown, Mrs. Edwin P. 

Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Carter, John & Co., Inc. 

Campbell, Walter M. 

Chapin, Mrs. Henry B. 

Chase, Miss Alice P. 

Clarke, Dr. and Mrs. George 0. 

Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. 

Colby Memorial Trust 

Committee of the Permanent Charity 

Fund 
Condit, Miss Louise 
Creighton, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. 
Crocker, Mrs. George H. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis, Sr. 



Dane, Mrs. John 

Dean Welfare Trust 

Dearborn, Mr. and Mrs. F. M., Jr. 



Elliot, Mr. and Mrs. John M. 

Emery, Mrs. Forrest 

Emmons, Mr." and Mrs. Robert, Jr. 

Fay, Eugene F., Estate 
Fegan, Mrs. William Jay 
Fisher, Mrs. Richard T. 
Flagg, Dr. and Mrs. Elisha 
Folsom, Grenville W. 
Friedman, Misses E. T. and S. M. 
Frothingham, Mrs. Langdon 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 
Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. Alvan T. 



Gilbert, Miss Helen C. 
Goodrich, Mrs. Wallace 
Grandin, Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Gray, Mrs. Reginald 

Halsey, Mrs. Martha Fuller 
Hasenfus, Nathaniel J. 
Hedge, Henry R. 
Hersey, Miss Ada H. 
Hoag, Mrs. Charles R. 
Houghton, Mrs. Clement S. 
Hovey, Mrs. Chandler 
Howe, James C. 

Howes Bros. Co. and Affiliated Com- 
panies 
Hubbard, Dr. and Mrs. Eliot, Jr. 
Hunnewell, Mr. James M. 
Hunnewell, Mrs. James W. 

Jenkins Brothers 

Kimball, Mrs. Benjamin P. 
King, Mrs. Gelston T. 

Ladies Aid Committee 

Lane, Mrs. Gardiner M. 

Leland, Miss Elizabeth C. 

Leland, Joseph D. 

Leland, Miss Luisita 

Lever Brothers Company 

Leveroni, Judge Frank 

Loring, Miss Marjorie C. 

Lyman, Mrs. Henry 

Lyman, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald T. 

Lyman, Mr. Theodore 

Mason, Mrs. Austin B. 
Meigs, Mrs. Martin S. 
Merrill, Mrs. Luther M. 
Moore, Mrs. Edward C. 
Moors, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. 
Morse, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. 

New England Power Association and 

Affiliated Company Employees 
Newell, Dr. Franklin S. 

Parker, Augustin H. 

Parker, Mr. and Mrs. William Amory 

Peavy, Mrs. Leopold 

Pfaelzer, Mrs. Franklin T. 

Phelan, Mrs. James J. 

Pokat Printing Company 



•{24} 



Rantoul, Mrs. Neal 
Ratshesky, Mrs. Theresa S. 
Reed, Miss Emily S. 
Rice, Harry L. 
Rice, Mr. John C. 
Richardson, Mrs. H. B. 
Rilev, Miss Mabel Louise 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 



Sanderson, E. L. 
Sayles, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. 
Schrafft, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. 
Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh D. 
Shepard, Miss Emily B. 
Shulman, Mrs. Isadore 
Slattery, E. T., Company 
Smith, Mrs. Charles L. 
Smith, Miss Ida C. 
Spaulding, Mr. and Mrs. John T 
Stanley, Mr. and Mrs. J. 



Steele, Mrs. Edwin L. 

Stockton, Mr. and Mrs. Charles H, 

Stockton, Mrs. Philip 

Swift, Mr. and Mrs. George H. 

Talbot, Dr. and Mrs. Fritz B. 
Thayer, Mrs. Warren 
Thomas, Miss Helen 
Travelli, Charles Irwin Fund 
Tuckerman, Mrs. Sears 

Van Kleeck, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Veazie, Miss Mary L. 

Watters, Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. 
Weld, Mrs. Rudolph 
Wiggin, Maude L. 
Winthrop, Miss Clara B. 
Winthrop, Miss Katherine 



•{25} 






-a> 



lc 









fro 






de* 



-f 






u 






FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation: 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 






.': 



SIXTY- FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Infants' Hospital 



FOR THE YEAR 1947 








1947 



SIXTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Infants' Hospital 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 



Purposes 



The Infants' Hospital is a charitable corporation chartered 
under the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Since 
1 88 1 , it has provided medical treatment for infants without re- 
gard to race, creed, color or residence. 

As one unit of the Children's Medical Center — others of 
which are the Children's Hospital, the House of the Good 
Samaritan, the Convalescent Home for Children and the 
Sharon Sanatorium — the Infants' Hospital shares the services 
of the coordinated Medical and Surgical Staff of the Center. 

Today, this hospital limits itself to the general medical care 
of infants under two years old. It looks forward, however, to 
assuming the responsibility for all phases of the care of infants 
of those ages upon completion of the new Children's Medical 
Center building. And with these added facilities, it can then 
better carry out its research of infants' diseases and the teaching 
of medical students and nurses. 



*947 



A Year of Anticipation 



The year 1947 has been one of real anticipation at the Infants' Hospital. 
The development of the Children's Medical Center is well under way. 
Already its effect has been reflected in policies and procedure. Economic 
changes that relate to hospitals in general are decidedly noticeable with a 
definite trend rapidly taking shape. Research, diagnosis and care have made 
steady progress with promise of even greater advancement ahead. 

And so, the sixty-fifth Report of the Infants' Hospital will deviate slightly 
from its customary form. As President, I shall try to give a comprehensive 
view of the whole. Frankly, I have borrowed freely from the individual re- 
ports of staff members and committee chairmen, whose original papers are 
available should you wish to study them in more detail. 



ORGANIZATION 

With the development of the Children's Medical Center the responsibili- 
ties falling upon those in charge of the different clinical services have in- 
creased markedly. This is particularly true in Medicine. The Physician-in- 
Chief, Dr. Janeway, found it impossible to maintain the close personal super- 
vision of the functions of the various portions of the Medical Service which is 
necessary to maintain the high standards of professional work which have 
characterized them in the past. For this reason, the Medical Department has 
been reorganized into a series of units for each of which a Senior member of 
the Staff has assumed the major supervisory responsibility. 



The Infants' Hospital is one of the most important such units of the Medi- 
cal Department. Dr. Clement A. Smith has assumed the responsibilities of 
Chief of the Infants' Hospital. He has given its problems a great deal of per- 
sonal thought and attention with marked benefit to the Hospital and its 
patients. 

PREMATURE NURSERY 

Another unit of the Medical Department included with the Infants' Hos- 
pital is the Premature Nursery. Because of the complete separation of the 
care of premature babies from the care of the general patients in the Infants' 
Hospital, supervision of the Premature Service at the Infants' Hospital has 
been placed under the able direction of Dr. Steward H. Clifford, who is also 
Chief of the Premature Nursery at the Boston Lying-in Hospital. This com- 
bined service for premature babies provides a unique assortment of clinical 
material which has enabled Dr. Clifford to give valuable experience to our 
internes each of whom is assigned to the Premature Service for a period of his 
training, and to the many physicians and public health workers who come to 
Boston for information concerning the care of premature babies. The Nursery 
of the Lying-in Hospital cares only for premature babies born in that hospital, 
most of whom are normal, while our premature nursery cares for babies sent 
in from outlying hospitals, many of whom are sick. Consequently there is a 
marked difference in the experience of the two nurseries. 

IMPROVEMENTS OF PHYSICAL PLANT 

Although there have been no major physical changes during 1947, much 
time has been spent in considering and planning such developments. Use 
of beds at a level constantly near or at capacity has naturally turned our 
thoughts frequently to our physical plant. The need for improvements arises 
from one actual present problem and one probably future problem. These 
are (a) the management of infants with transmissible infections, and (b) the 



requirement for space for private patients. Over and above these matters, we 
have the constant problem of a demand for our services which necessitates 
refusal of admission for about one sick baby every day. 

PROTECTION OF PATIENTS 

During the past year, reports have appeared in the lay press of several 
epidemics of infectious diarrhea in nearby obstetrical nurseries. Even though 
every such epidemic in and near Boston has not been publicized, there is 
ample evidence that all too many cases of an insidiously infectious disease 
process have occurred. The matter is especially serious because babies may 
thus develop a disease as a consequence of being in a hospital. An infants' 
hospital such as ours naturally becomes a focus to which many such babies 
tend to be transferred. We consider it our duty to accept them. Consequently, 
infants admitted with all other complaints must be scrupulously protected 
against transfer of infection from one of these babies. Since diarrhea is a major 
symptom of all sorts of infant illness, the problem of identification of trans- 
missible from noninfectious disease is extremely important and, unfortu- 
nately, difficult. Thus, any infant with this very common symptom must be re- 
garded with suspicion. Necessary measures of safeguarding all our patients 
include care not only against transmission of potential infection by direct or in- 
direct contact, but also against any conceivable contamination of food supply. 

Against the latter problem, an extensive study of our Milk Laboratory, or 
Formula Room, equipment showed that we did not have adequate defenses. 
Accordingly, during the past year, the Welfare Committee of the Infants' 
Hospital has provided for the purchase and installation of the most modern 
sterilizing equipment for milk preparation. It may be of interest that the 
sterilizer purchased conforms to standards required by law in an increasing 
number of states. To make ideal use of this equipment, the present treatment 
room on the lower floor is to be converted to a receiving or wash room for re- 
turned bottles and nipples. These will be sterilized during their passage into 



the present formula room, which will thus become a "clean" room. The 
sterilizer is to be installed, as soon as temporary quarters for formula prepara- 
tion can be arranged, in the Hospital basement. The Medical and Nursing 
staffs welcome this improvement, which will eliminate one very large aspect 
of our actual and potential infection problem. 

By this move we shall lose our central treatment room on the first floor, 
but reasonably satisfactory arrangements for doing treatments on one of the 
sun porches can be substituted. No one doubts that the sacrifice in treatment 
room space will be more than compensated by the relief of our worries as to 
the absolute sterility of formulas. 

During the first part of 1947, all beds on the lower floor of the hospital 
were set aside for infants with diarrheal disease. This meant the frequent re- 
fusal of admission for infants not so afflicted, even though there happened to 
be an empty bed on that floor, a circumstance largely accounting for our re- 
duction in admissions. Since September, we have been able to limit the 
necessary beds for infants with that condition to one-half of our lower floor, 
thus making three-quarters of our beds potentially available for other types of 
illness. Even with this greater flexibility, conditions are far from ideal in terms 
of the efficiency and safety potentially attainable. Much thought has there- 
fore been given to the possibility of isolation in air conditioned beds, each 
with its individual supply of outdoor air, and thus similar in many respects 
to our new Chapple-type incubators for premature infants. Dr. Chappie came 
up from Philadelphia to confer with us during the year, but the sketch plans 
resulting from his visit have been set aside pending decisions on item "(b)" 
above — the problem of private patients. 

PRIVATE AND WARD PATIENTS 

For economic reasons, and also in keeping with recent hospital trends 
elsewhere, the policy of admitting semi-private patients to the general public 
wards was recently adopted. Such patients are now admitted to public wards 



with full understanding on the part of parents that although semi-private 
rates are established, their infants occupy cribs and cubicles in no way set 
apart or distinguishable from those occupied by public ward cases. The 
child is also available to staff and medical students for teaching purposes. As a 
result of this, responsibilities of the Hospital as a teaching unit affiliated with 
Harvard Medical School continue to be met. The private ward of The 
Children's Hospital still remains available to those whose parents prefer it, 
and to those whose special condition makes isolation more desirable from the 
medical point of view. For the care of the average sick baby, however, the 
regular infants' Hospital wards are from the viewpoint of doctor, nurse and 
patient, as adequate and convenient — if not more so — than are the rooms 
and equipment of the private wing in the main building of The Children's 
Hospital. 

POTENTIAL CHANGES 

However, estimates ranging between $8,000 and $10,000 have been 
obtained as to the cost of converting the second floor of the hospital into a 
series of single, double, and perhaps four-bed rooms. This whole project 
awaits consideration by the Trustees of the Hospital. Until a decision is 
reached, other architectural changes aimed at controlling the airborne or 
contact spread of infection must be held in abeyance. In any case, the readi- 
ness of our teaching staff to accept these potential changes, some of them per- 
haps inconvenient, has been noteworthy and gratifying. 

NURSING SHORTAGE 

The nursing shortage stands out as another important reason for a some- 
what reduced census at times. Available nursing talent was distributed to 
best advantage between the various services, and it is believed that no seri- 
ously ill infant was refused admission. A more careful selection of cases on the 
basis of severity of illness was necessary — a direct reflection of the nursing 



shortage, since the younger the child the higher the required ratio of nurses to 
patients. Indirectly, this selection resulted in an increased nursing work-load, 
since there was a high percentage of seriously ill cases at all times. 

Consider, too, one other serious complication caused by the lack of suffi- 
cient nursing staff, or of a sufficient staff of auxiliary personnel (such as ward 
helpers and others) who feed and otherwise directly care for our patients. So 
much time must be given by our graduate nurses to these activities that they 
often cannot find opportunity to accompany the physicians on ward rounds. 
This absence of the nurse from those daily sessions at which therapeutic 
policy is made, was a source of frequent comment by our many visitors who 
came from abroad for the International Pediatric Congress last summer. We 
consider it an evidence of an unsatisfactory situation. 

PROGRESSIVE THERAPY 

Medical progress has included certain definite forward steps in therapy. A 
method for replacing the blood of newborn infants suffering from erythro- 
blastosis (the "Rh disease") has been as successful as it is dramatic. The 
transfusion technique worked out by Dr. L. K. Diamond and his associates 
utilizes a special non-irritating plastic catheter which can be inserted a dis- 
tance of inches into the umbilical vein soon after birth. This same catheter 
has been found most effective as a means for continuous infusions into other 
infants requiring slow but constant restoration of body fluids in diarrheal 
disease. Our success in managing that condition, referred to at length above, 
has been increased in consequence of the painstaking metabolism studies 
carried out by Dr. Gamble and Dr. Wallace. Unfortunately, the newer 
drugs including streptomycin are ineffective in diarrheal disease, but strep- 
tomycin has proved a signally effective forward step in the treatment of 
meningitis caused by the influenza bacillus. In infants that disease carried a 
25% mortality under previous recent treatment; this figure has been cut at 
least in half during the past year. 



8 



PREMATURE INFANTS 

Eighty-two of our 84.3 admissions were premature infants (who received a 
total of 2,248 days' care). Dr. S. H. Clifford of the Premature Nurseries has 
presented in his report on that division certain illuminating data. Unfor- 
tunately, these do not include a reduction in mortality rate for premature 
infants during the past year, but they do indicate a significant change in the 
distribution of deaths at various ages. In 1946, 59% of our premature infant 
deaths occurred in the first two days; this figure was reduced from 59% to 
48% in the past year. For mortality between 3 and 14 days the drop was 
more striking -- from 26% in 1946 to 13% in 1947. This means that while 
we have kept a good many more premature infants alive for two weeks, we 
have seen more of them succumb after two weeks. It is of considerable in- 
terest that the routine has been to keep all premature babies in the new 
Chapple-type beds for two weeks after their admission. The evidence is 
strong that with more such beds mortality could be reduced. Another impli- 
cation of Dr. Clifford's report is that our premature infants may occasionally 
suffer from an insufficiency of nursing personnel. Present policies do not keep 
a graduate nurse in the premature nursery at all times. 

Incidentally, Dr. Clifford has recently called our attention to the likeli- 
hood that the Hospital could be reimbursed by state funds legally available 
for premature infant care. 

THE STAFF 

It is particularly gratifying to record the recognition which has come to 
members of our Staff for their accomplishments. Dr. Clement A. Smith has 
served as Vice President of the Society for Pediatric Research during the past 
year and as Member of the Sponsoring and Reception Committees of the 
Fifth International Pediatric Congress held in New York in July, 1947. Dur- 
ing the summer Dr. Smith increased his wide circle of friends and did a great 



service in taking charge of the visits of a series of distinguished foreign pedia- 
tricians to Boston. Dr. Smith is Chairman of the National Committee on 
Mothers' Milk Bureaus of the American Academy of Pediatrics and Chair- 
man of the Massachusetts State Committee on the Fetus and Newborn of that 
organization. Dr. Clifford's reputation in his special field of interest has 
earned him the important position of Chairman of the National Committee 
on the Fetus and the Newborn of the American Academy of Pediatrics; he 
also serves as Chairman of the Advisory Committee on School Health of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society. These facts merely serve to emphasize the 
ability and national reputation of the men who are providing professional 
leadership for the Infants' Hospital. Two other members of our Staff have 
received national recognition for their accomplishments in the field of 
Pediatrics. Dr. James L. Gamble received the Borden Award at the American 
Academy of Pediatrics meeting in Pittsburgh in February, 1947, while Dr 
Louis K. Diamond received the Mead Johnson Award at the Academy meet- 
ing in Dallas in December, 1947. 

THE SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

The total number of cases referred to the Social Service Department of the 
Infants' Hospital for the year 1947 was 163. These cases are divided into two 
groups; those which required intensive treatment on the part of the social 
worker and those to which more limited help was given. Of the former type, 
there were 1 1 2 cases and 5 1 of the latter. As in 1 946, these cases covered a 
wide variety of diagnoses. 

CHANGES IN PERSONNEL 

To return to the Hospital as a whole, two changes in personnel deserve men- 
tion. Although Dr. Guy W. Brugler came to the Infants' and Children's 
Hospitals only late in the year, we have already felt his skill and strength as 
an administrator. On the debit side, we have lost through resignation on 



10 



December 3 our nursing supervisor for the past several years — Miss Mary 
Edith Chapman. She will be sorely missed, for she combined untiring devo- 
tion to her task, unusual perceptiveness of the needs of the patients, and 
the constant stimulus of a delightful personality. 

ECONOMIC CHANGES 

During 1947, Infants' Hospital continued to feel the effects of the changing 
economic picture relating to hospitals in general. Immediate threat of an 
overwhelming deficit was avoided by a mutually satisfactory arrangement 
between it and The Children's Hospital. A special grant for deferred main- 
tenance, made by the Greater Boston Community Fund, was also helpful. 

It is hoped that a carefully constructed budget for 1948 will enable analysis 
of elements of expense. Control of expense is dependent upon this tool. In- 
come and expense must meet if the assets of voluntary hospitals are to be 
preserved for the future. It is our feeling that they should be preserved, in 
order that they may continue to serve community needs in years to come . 
Any other course would be shortsighted. In the light of expanding activities 
of The Children's Medical Center, our obligation for the future is, if any- 
thing, increased. 

THE CHILDREN'S MEDICAL CENTER 

This is an appropriate place to point out some of the changes which have 
been accelerated by the development of the Children's Medical Center. The 
character of the patients entering the Hospital is gradually changing. A 
decreasing proportion come from its immediate vicinity with the commoner 
acute illnesses, while an increasing number come from more or less distant 
communities, many of them after a considerable period of hospitalization 
with very difficult problems of diagnosis and treatment. It is this factor as 
much as anything which makes for the high costs of care at this Hospital. 
The complexity of the Medical situations we are called on to treat is balanced 



1 1 



by the increased resources of the Children's Medical Center. The develop- 
ment of the Division of Laboratories and Research, the Children's Cancer 
Center, the Seizure Unit, and the Hematology Division have put new tools at 
our disposal, while the specialized skill of our colleagues in Surgery, Neuro- 
surgery, Orthopedics, Otolaryngology, and Radiology means that today a 
patient in the Infants' Hospital has available to him the accumulated ex- 
perience and techniques of outstanding men in every aspect of the care of 
healthy and sick children. This team of workers consists not only of the 
Medical Staff, but of the nurses, social workers, therapists, and the large 
army of lay-personnel. Although handicapped by cramped quarters and by 
buildings which are neither efficiently planned nor economical to operate, the 
Children's Medical Center is a living, growing organism. Moreover, its 
organizational structure of multiple units with individuals personally re- 
sponsible for each means that its expansion has not taken away the intimate, 
friendly character of the Infants' and Children's Hospitals of the past. The 
Individual patient and his welfare still remain at the heart of our activities 
and we are constantly striving in teaching and practice to emphasize human 
quality of the healing art. 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH 

President 



12 



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STATEMENT of INCOME and EXPENSE 
for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31,1947 

RECEIPTS 

Income: 

Income from hospital care and services: 

Bed and board, patients $100,098.51 

Special duty nurses 2,570.28 

Operations 295-00 

X-ray 6,087.00 

Laboratory fees 13,317.92 

Drugs 10,474.53 

Miscellaneous 7,876.68 

Total billings to patients 77777777777 $140,719.92 

Less: Mass. Hospital Service 8,568.88 

Other agencies 610.55 

Allowances to patients 11,551-52 

Accounts written off, net 12,685-38 33,416.33 

Total income from hospital care and services $107,303-59 

Income from investments 36,337.09 

Income from trusts 811 .30 

Donations: 

Greater Boston Community Fund 25,994.45 

Other contributions for general purposes 3,520.00 29,514.45 



Total Income $173,966.43 

PAYMENTS 

Expenses : 

Hospital Expenses: 

Cost of Hospital Service billed by the C. H $215,344.26 

Salaries 500.00 

Pensions 1,198.80 

Miscellaneous 295.00 

$217,338.06 

Treasurer's office expense: 

Salaries 1,044.04 

Rent 180.00 

Legal and audit - 225.00 

Miscellaneous 370.82 

$1,819.86 

Total Expenses $219,157.92 

Excess of Expense over Income: 

Year ended December 31, 1947 45,191-49 

Deduct: Portion of above loss to be assumed by 

The Children's Hospital per agreement dated October 29, 1947 . . . 688.50 

Net Loss . $44,502.99 

14 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Lincoln Baylies, Treasurer 

BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1947 

ASSETS 

Assets of General Fund: 

Cash in bank $ 7,569.37 

Accounts receivable 29,538.77 

Investments at cost or at estimated market value 
at time of acquisition: 
Bonds and stocks (Market value $454,105) 433,723.73 

— $470,831.87 
Assets of Restricted Funds : 

Investments at cost or at estimated market value 
at time of acquisition: 

Bonds and stocks (Market value $273,920) $291,074.18 

Cash in bank, uninvested 11,066.81 

— $302,140.99 
Assets of restricted funds for designated purposes: 

Cash in bank $ 5,505.00 

Plant assets: 
Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr. Memorial Hospital : 

Building and equipment $154,845.93 

TOTAL ASSETS $933,323.79 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

General Fund: 

Due to The Children's Hospital 
for hospital services rendered $17,194.84 

Amounts withheld from employees for taxes 26.40 

General fund capital 453,610.63 

$470,831.87 

Restricted funds, general: 

Principal of funds 302,140.99 

Restricted funds for designated purposes : 

For new building construction costs 5,505.00 

Plant: 

Plant capital. . . . 154,845-93 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL $933,323.79 

CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 
To the Officers and Trustees of the Infants' Hospital: 

We have made an examination of the financial books and records of Infants' Hospital for the year ended December 31, 1947. 
We satisfied ourselves that all recorded cash receipts were deposited in the bank and we examined cancelled checks for all disburse- 
ments. We verified the balance of cash in bank by a certificate from the depository, and ascertained that all investment income had 
been recorded, by comparison with investment publications. On January 5, 1948, we inspected the investments of the General and 
Restricted Funds, and found them to be in order. 

In our opinion, based on such examination, the accompanying balance sheet and statement of income and expense present fairly 
the financial condition of the Hospital at December 31, 1947, and the results of its operations for the year then ended, in conformity 
with generally accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 

CHARLES F. RITTENHOUSE & COMPANY 
Boston, Massachusetts Certified Public Accountants 

March 31, 1948 

l 5 



INCOME 



EXPENSES 




DONATIONS 

(INCLUDING COMMUNITY FUND) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE 



NUMBER OF PATIENTS TREATED 



PATIENTS 
1000 

800 

600 



200 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ I I I I I 
1111111111 
11111 I 1 I 1 1 

rrrlttttTi 

1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 



AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY 



ass 

1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 



THE CHILDREN'S MEDICAL CENTER STAFF 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Physician-in-Chief — Charles A. Janeway, M.D. 

GENERAL MEDICINE 



Physicians 

Metabolism Division — James L. Gamble, M.D., Chief 
Premature Service — Stewart H. Clifford, M.D., Chief 
Infants' Service — Clement A. Smith, M.D., Chief 
Children's Medical Service — Randolf K. Byers, M.D., Chief 
Private Medical Service — John A. V. Davies, M.D., Chief 
Isolation Service — R. Cannon Eley, M.D., Chief 
Wellesley Convalescent Home — Henry E. Gallup, M.D., Chief 
Medical Out-Patient Department — Sydney S. Gellis, M. D., Chief 

Eliot Hubbard, Jr., M.D., 

Associate Chief 
Louis K. Diamond, M.D. 
David D. Rutstein, M.D. 
Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 
Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 



Associate Physicians 

Olga E. Allers, M.D. 
William Berenberg, M.D. 
Gerald N. Hoeffel, M.D. 
Theodore H. Ingalls, M.D. 
Dorothea May Moore, M.D. 
Robert T. Moulton, M.D. 
Harry L. Mueller, M.D. 
Harry Schwachman, M.D. 
Lendon Snedeker, M.D. 
Stuart S. Stevenson, M.D. 
William J. Turtle, M.D. 
William M. Wallace, M.D. 



Assistant Physicians 

John K. Brines, M.D. 
Edward C. Dyer, M.D. 
Albert A. Frank, M.D. 
Elizabeth A. Gregory, M.D. 
Allen M. Hill, M.D. 
William H. Horwitz, M.D. 
John E. Hubbell, M.D. 
Alexander S. MacDonald, M.D. 
Donald E. McLean, M.D. 
Rose C. Munro, M.D. 
Alice Nauen, M.D. 
Joseph Osborne, M.D. 
Mary E. Perry, M.D. 
Henry M. Putnam, M.D. 
Jacob Wallace, M.D. 



SPECIAL MEDICAL DIVISIONS 



Neurological Division 
Physician 
Psychologist 
Assistant Psychiatrist 

Seizure Division 
Assistant Physician 



— Bronson Crothers, M.D., Chief 
Randolph K. Byers, M.D. 
Edith Meyer, Ph.D. 

Lydia Dawes, M.D. 

— William G. Lennox, M.D., Chief 
Edward C. Dyer, M.D. 



17 



Special Medical Divisions — Continued 

Hematology Division 



Research Assistant 
Assistant Director of 
the Blood Bank 

Allergy Division 
Associate Physicians 

Assistant Physicians 



Cardiology Division 
Assistant Physicians 

Rheumatic Fever Division 
Assistant Physicians 



Child Health Division 
Associate Physicians 



Assistant Physicians 



— Louis K. Diamond, M.D., Chief 

and Director of the Blood Bank 
Fred H. Allen, Jr., M.D. 
George W. Dana, M.D. 

— Lewis Webb Hill, M.D., Chief 
Nathan Gorin, M.D. 
Sidney H. Weiner, M.D. 
Alta Ashley, M.D. 
William H. Horwitz, M.D. 
Harry L. Mueller, M.D. 

— Hyman Green, M.D., Associate Chief 
Elizabeth A. Gregory, M.D. 
Jacob Wallace, M.D. 

— Benedict F. Massell, M.D., Chief 
James T. Cameron, M.D. 
Lillian F. McMackin, M.D. 
Mary E. Perry, M.D. 

— Harold C. Stuart, M.D., Chief 
Stanton Garfield, M.D. 
Lendon Snedeker, M.D. 
Stuart S. Stevenson, M.D. 
Margaret Jane Borges, M.D. 
Jean Frances Webb, M.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

GENERAL SURGICAL DIVISION 

Surgeon-in-Chief — Robert E. Gross, M.D. 

Surgeons Associate Surgeons 

Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. Thomas W. Botsford, M.D. 

Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. Chilton Crane, M.D. 
Orvar Swenson. M.D. 



Assistant Surgeon 

John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 

Division of Otolaryngology 
Associate Otolaryngologist 
Assistant Otolaryngologists 



Henry W. Hudson, Jr., M.D. 
Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. 



Carlyle G. Flake, M.D., Chief 

Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 
Division of Ophthalmology — Trygve Gundersen, M.D., Chief 
Associate Ophthalmologists S. Forrest Martin, M.D. 

Garrett L. Sullivan, M.D. 

Joseph M. Clough, M.D. 

Sumner D. Liebman, M.D. 

Joseph J. LoPresti, M.D. 

Earl S. Seale, M.D. 



Assistant Ophthalmologists 



18 



DENTAL SERVICE 

Chief — Paul K. Losch, D.D.S. 



Division of Dentistry 
Associate Stomatologist 
Assistant Stomatologists 



Division of Orthodontia 
Associate Orthodontists 

Assistant Orthodontists 



Assistant Oral Pathologist 
Speech Correctionist 



Paul K. Losch, Stomatologist 
David Weisberger, M.D., D.M.D. 
Harry Bailey, D.M.D. 
Charles Campelia, D.M D. 
Paul Gilpatric, D.M.D. 
Abraham Kaner, D.M.D. 

Edward I. Silver, D.M.D. 
Charles M. Waldo, D.D.S. 
Henry Beebe, D.D.S. 
Melvin I. Cohen, D.M.D. 
Abijah Pierce, D.M.D. 
Emory Farrington, D.M.D. 
Maurice Dinnerman, D.M.D. 
Esther S. Shapiro 



ANESTHESIA SERVICE 

Anesthesiologist — Robert M. Smith, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief — William T. Green, M.D. 



Orthopedic Surgeons 

Albert H. Brewster, M.D. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 



Associate Orthopedic Surgeons 

David Grice, M.D. 
Paul Hugenberger, M.D. 
Meier G. Karp, M.D. 



Assistant Orthopedic Surgeons 

William Elliston, M.D. 
Thomas Gucker, 3rd, M.D. 
John G. Kuhns, M.D. 
Charles L. Sturdevant, M.D. 

DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY 

Radiologist- in-Chief — E. B. D. Neuhauser, M.D. 
Associate Radiologist Martin Wittenborg, M.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSURGERY 

Neurosurgeon-in-Chief — Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. 



Associate Neurosurgeon 

Donald D. Matson, M.D. 



Assistant Neurosurgeon 

John J. Lowrey, M.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORIES AND RESEARCH 

Chairman — Sidney Farber, M.D. 



19 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Pathologist-in-Chief — Sidney Farber, M.D. 



Neuropathologist 
Assistant Pathologist 
Research Associates 



Orville T. Bailey, M.D. 
Israel Diamond, M.D. 
J. LeRoy Conel, Ph.D. 
Lawrence Kingsland, M.D. 



Research Division oj Chemistry — Halvor N. Christensen, Ph.D., Chief 
Research Division oj Clinical Pathology — Harry Schwachman, M.D., Chief 
Research Division oj Infectious Diseases — John Enders, Ph.D., Chief 
Research Division of Nutrition ■ — S. Burt Wolbach, M.D., Chief 



CONSULTANTS 



Donald L. Augustine, M.D., 

Comparative Pathology 
J. Lewis Bremer, M.D., Embryology 
C. Sidney Burwell, M.D., Medicine 
Allan M. Butler, M.D., Medicine 
Paul Chandler, M.D., Ophthalmology 
Austin W. Cheever, M.D., Dermatology 
David G. Cogan, M.D., Ophthalmology 
Eugene B. Dunphy, M.D., 

Ophthalmology 
Albert B. Ferguson, M.D., Radiology 
Jacob Fine, M.D., Anesthesiology 
J. Roswell Gallagher, M.D., 

Medicine 
George E. Gardner, M.D., Psychiatry 
J. Hartwell Harrison, M.D., Urology 
A. Baird Hastings, M.D., 

Biological Chemistry 
T. Duckett Jones, M.D., Medicine 
Otto Krayer, M.D., Pharmacology 



Eugene M. Landis, M.D., Physiology 
Francis D. Moore, M.D., Surgery 
Alan R. Moritz, M.D., Pathology 
J. Howard Mueller, M.D., 

Bacteriology 
Francis C. Newton/M.D., Surgery 
William C. Quinby, M.D., Urology 
Leroy A. Schall, M.D., Otolaryngology 
Murray Shear, M.D., Biochemistry 
Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. , Radiology 
George W. Thorn, M.D., Medicine 
Frederick H. Verhooff, M.D., 

Ophthalmology 
Carl W. Walter, M.D. Surgery 
Shields Warren, M.D., Pathology 
Conrad Wesselhoeft, M.D., 

Infectious Diseases 
James L. Whittenberger, M.D., 

Physiology 
George Wislocki, M.D., Anatomy 



EMERITI 



George Cutler, M.D. 
William E. Ladd, M.D. 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. 



Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 
Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 



20 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL — 1948 

Officers 

President: Arthur G. Rotch 
Treasurer: Lincoln Baylies 
Secretary: John M. Hall 
Ass't. Secretary and Ass't. Treasurer: Charles M. Rotch 



Directors 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 
Mrs. William Benjamin Bacon 
Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 
Lincoln Baylies, ex-officio 
Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 
Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 
Hasket Derby 
Charles Devens 
Mrs. Samuel Eliot 
Mrs. Carlyle G. Flake 
Alexander C. Forbes 
Mrs. Thomas B. Gannett 
H. Frederick Hagemann, Jr. 
John M. Hall, ex-officio 
Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 
Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 



Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 
Marcien Jenckes 
Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 
Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II 
Judge Frank Leveroni 
George V. L. Meyer 
P. A. O'Connell 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch, ex-officio 
Charles M. Rotch, ex-officio 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. Theodore Sturtevant 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Henry K. White 



Administrator of the Hospital 

Guy W. Brugler, M. D. 

Director of Nurses 

Muriel B. Vesey, R. N. 

Physician -in -Chief 

Charles A. Janeway, M. D. 

Chief of Infants' Hospital 

Clement A. Smith, M. D. 



Lincoln Baylies 



Finance Committee 

Charles M. Rotch 



Henry K. White 



Home Furnishings and Buildings and Maintenance Committee 

Arthur G. Rotch Mrs. Samuel D. Warren Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II 

Community Fund Delegates 

Lincoln Baylies Guy W. Brugler, M. D. 



21 



WELFARE COMMITTEE OF 
THE CHILDREN'S and INFANTS' HOSPITALS 



Chairman 

Mrs. Alexander Wheeler 

Vice Chairman 

Mrs. C. Sidney Burwell 
Mrs. Donald Falvey 

Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. Robert N. Nye 

Recording Secretary 

Mrs. John A. Blanchard 

Treasurer 

Parkman D. Howe 

Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence 

Chairman Infants' Hospital Committee 

Mrs. Roger W. Cutler, Jr. 



22 



WELFARE COMMITTEE OF 
THE CHILDREN'S and INFANTS' HOSPITALS 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
January 1, 1947 — January 1, 1948 (Mrs. John E. Lawrence, Treas.) 

Balance on hand January 1, 1947 C. H. Cash 6,444.48 

Balance on hand January 1, 1947 Lunch Shop Cash 1,011.03 

RECEIPTS 

Profit from Coca-Cola Machine $ 299.75 

Women's Clubs 525.00 

Birthday Club 366.00 

Donations 384.50 

C. H. Clubs 4,931.85 

Thrift Shop 2,881.63 

Holiday Committee 150.00 

Profit from sale of C. H. Matches 76.00 

Dues 1,347.00 

Order of the Eastern Star 60.00 

Yankee Trading Post 3,655-76 

Net Proceeds from operation of Lunch Shop 2,506,43 17,193.92 

~ $24,649-43 

PAYMENTS 

Nurses' Teas 187.28 

Entertainments 57.05 

Holiday Parties 150.00 

Benches for Out-Patient Department 192.57 

Chappel Bed for Surgical Service 990.00 

To Medical Center Campaign 7,909.28 

Equipment for Infants' Hosp. Formula Room 3,574.73 

Toys and Clothes, Infants' Hospital 92.54 

C. H. Christmas Fund 25-00 

Toward support of Memorial Beds 600.00 

Salaries 3,276.00 

Expenses 452.80 

Reimbursement to Hosp. for Lunch Shop alterations 2,040.00 19,547.25 

Balance on hand January 1, 1948 C. H. Cash 4,624.72 

Balance on hand January 1, 1948 Lunch Shop Cash 477.46 

$24,649.43 

23 



MEMBERS OF CORPORATION 



Allen, Mrs. Thomas 
Ames, Mrs. John S., Jr. 
Anderson, Mrs. Larz 

Bacon, Mrs. William Benjamin 
Bartlett, Mrs. Matthew 
Bartlett, Nelson S., Jr. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Nelson S., Jr. 
Baylies, Lincoln 
Beale, Arthur M. 
Bell, Mrs. Stoughton 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward L. 
Boardman, Mrs. E. A. 
Bradley, Mrs. J. Gardner 
Bremer, Mrs. Theodore G. 
Burke, Mrs. Edmund J. 

Chapin, Mrs. John R. 
Clark, Mrs. R. J. 
Converse, Miss. E. N. 
Crowninshield,, Mrs. F. B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Allen 
Curtis, Mrs. E. R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Louis 
Cutler, Mrs. Roger W. 

DeForde, Miss Alice 
Derby, Hasket 
Devens, Charles 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 

Flake, Mrs. Carlyle G. 
Forbes, Alexander C. 
Forbes, F. Murray 
Frothingham, Mrs. Louis A. 

Gannett, Mrs. Thomas B. 

Hagemann, Frederick H., Jr. 

Hall, Mrs. John L. 

Hall, John M. 

Hamlen, Mrs. Nathaniel 

Higginson, Mrs. F. L. 

Homans, Mrs. John 

Hovey, Mrs. Charles F. 

HUNNEWELL, F. W. 

Iasigi, Mrs. Mary V. 

Jackson, Mrs. James 
Jackson, Mrs. James, Jr. 
Janeway, Dr. Charles A. 
Jenckes, Marcien 



Kaufmann, Mrs. Carl F. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Frederick B. 
Kidder, Mrs. Alfred, II 
Kimball, Mrs. M. M. 



Leveroni, Judge Frank 
Lovett, Mrs. R. W. 



Merriman, Mrs. Roger B. 
Meyer, George v. L. 
Milliken, Minot K. 
Motley, Mrs. E. Preble 

Nickerson, Mrs. Roland W. 

0*Connell. P. A. 



Palmer, Mrs. Henry W. 
Palmer, Henry W., Jr. 
Palmer, Mrs. Henry W., Jr. 
Parker, Mrs. F. S. 



Richardson, Mrs. Homer B. 
Rotch, Arthur G. 
Rotch, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Rotch, Charles M. 



Sargent, Mrs. S. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Henry R. 
Scott, Mrs. Hugh D. 
Sears, Mrs. Philip S. 
Seymour, Robert W. 
Shaw, S. PArkman, Jr. 
Sheafe, Mrs. William 
Simmons, Mrs. G. W. 
Smith, Dr. Richard M. 
Stillman, Mrs. Carl S. 
Stockton, Mrs. Philip 

Talbot, Mrs. Fritz B. 
Tarbell, Mrs. John F. 
Thacher, Mrs. T. C. 
Tower, Miss E. M. 
Tudor, Mrs. Henry 

Warren, Mrs. Fiske 
Warren, Mrs. S. D. 
Webster, Edwin S. 
White, Henry K. 
Windeler. Mrs. G. H. 



24 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation : 

I give and bequeath to the INFANTS' HOSPITAL, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 






SIXTY-SIXTH AND SIXTY-SEVENTH 
ANNUAL REPORTS 

Infants' Hospital 

FOR THE YEARS 1948 - 1949 




1948-1949 

SIXTY-SIXTH AND SIXTY-SEVENTH 
ANNUAL REPORTS 

Infants' Hospital 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE 
BOSTON 




Incorporated January 19, 1881 



Purposes 



The Infants' Hospital is a charitable corporation chartered 
under the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Since 
1 88 1, it has provided medical treatment for infants without 
regard to race, creed, color or residence. 

As one unit of The Children's Medical Center — others of 
which are The Children's Hospital, the House of the Good 
Samaritan, the Children's Mission to Children, the Hospital and 
Convalescent Home for Children and The Sharon Sanatorium 
— the Infants' Hospital shares the services of the coordinated 
Medical and Surgical Staff of the Center. 

Today, this hospital limits itself to the general medical care 
of infants under tw r o years old. It looks forward, however, to 
assuming the responsibility for all phases of the care of infants 
of those ages upon completion of the new Children's Medical 
Center building. And with these added facilities, it can then 
better carry out its research of infants' diseases and the teaching 
of medical students and nurses. 



Report of Progress 

In its 67th and 68th years, the Infants' Hospital continued to justify its 
place in the community, and as part of The Children's Medical Center, it is 
gratifying to report that great progress has been made in transforming the 
Medical Center concept into actuality. 

In 1948, there was a pronounced tendency toward shortened stay with 
increasing admissions and slightly fewer total bed days of service. In 1949, 
admissions continued to increase and a slightly higher average census was 
noted. Total service, as measured by bed days, was therefore greater. Admis- 
sions to the hospital were 942 in 1946 as against 1228 in 1949. The decreased 
length of stay can be attributed to better professional care, including nursing, 
and to improved medical knowledge and skill. It means better care for pa- 
tients, but short stays mean more "work" per patient; they are more costly 
and our daily costs have risen. However, cost per case declined from $250 in 
1947 to $210.60 in 1949. With the purchasing power of the dollar about 50% 
of that a decade ago, the cost per case becomes still more favorable by com- 
parison. In terms of today's dollar, hospital care is much less costly than ten 
years ago and continues to decrease. 

As far as the overall operations are concerned, Infants' and Children's 
Hospitals showed a larger combined operating loss. The inflationary spiral of 
our economy has brought higher supply costs, salaries have risen and working 
hours have been shortened necessitating more personnel also required as the 
result of increased admissions and more rapid turnover of patients. Another 
factor of importance has been the loss of revenue enforced by the Blue Cross 
contract in effect during the past year. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

The Medical Department under Dr.Janeway as Physician-in-Chief is sub- 



divided into the Premature Service under Dr. Clifford and Infants' Service 
under Dr. Smith. We are pleased to report the promotion of Dr. Smith, in the 
Harvard Medical School, to Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Boston 
Lying-in Hospital. The faithful work of the staff of nurses and house officers 
is in a large part responsible for the very satisfactory record of these two divi- 
sions. 

In the Premature Service, we are happy to report a continued reduction 
in premature infant mortality and morbidity over the past two years. In 
1949, the overall mortality for the premature infants admitted to the Infants' 
Hospital reached the remarkably low figure of 23 per cent. We have been 
able to save 27 per cent of the smallest babies, in the two pounds three ounces 
and under group. We saved 69 per cent of those two pounds four ounces 
through three pounds four ounces, and 92 per cent of the 37 babies weighing 
from three pounds five ounces to four pounds six ounces. 

For comparison in 1945, the overall mortality was 60 per cent, and all 
babies smaller than two pounds three ounces died as did 77 per cent of those 
from two pounds four ounces to three pounds four ounces, and 51 per cent of 
those between three pounds five ounces and four pounds six ounces. This 
remarkable record has been achieved with the individual isolation of each 
baby in Isolette Units and the provision of our autoclave and formula room. 
The prevention and control of infection has continued with no diarrheal 
disease in any infant in the nursery during 1949. During the two years of 
1948 and 1949 with 206 premature infants of all sizes in our nursery, no 
infant died after reaching the age of eight days. 

A new Massachusetts law provides financial assistance to qualified hos- 
pitals to cover all-out cost of premature infant care. It may well develop that 
smaller hospitals will find it financially advantageous to provide this care 
and we may have a smaller number of prematures sent us in the future, but 
can reasonably expect to receive the problem premature babies. Should this 
prediction prove to be correct, we may anticipate a higher mortality and 



morbidity rate in our nursery and accept it as evidence that we are perform- 
ing an even greater service to a larger community. 

In Infants' Service in 1949, the mortality rate was 8.6% with deaths 
during the first two weeks after birth accounting for a little more than one- 
third of the total, a striking concentration of mortality in less than 2% of 
our age range and an indication of the outstanding importance of the new- 
born period. Among causes of mortality congenital malformations of the 
heart and erythroblastosis (the "Rh-disease") were the largest categories. 
Detailed research is being conducted on these. On the brighter side of the 
picture is the obvious fact that a very great proportion of the older babies were 
cured of the various conditions requiring their admission. New "miracle- 
drugs" appear with such frequency that careful observations of one are not 
finished before another is introduced. Constant studies are made of the uses 
of these drugs. 

As a unit of the Medical Center, closely affiliated with the Harvard 
Medical School, the Infants' Hospital can draw on extraordinary resources 
for a fifty-five bed hospital. Its patients are the beneficiaries of the rapid 
progress of medical research both within and without the hospital. Psycho- 
logical studies are being conducted with an eye to the emotional needs of the 
patient, while separated from his family in the hospital. These studies may 
ultimately lead us to ask for changes in the physical structure of the wards as 
well as in the practices of the staff. 

WOMEN'S COMMITTEE 

The Welfare Committee of The Children's Hospital is now known as the 
Women's Committee of The Children's Medical Center and with its many 
sub-committees is of great service to the Infants' Hospital. The Infants' 
Hospital sub-committee formerly under the chairmanship of Mrs. Roger W. 
Cutler, Jr., and now under Mrs. Parmely W. Herrick assisted by Mrs. Lau- 
rence J. Brengle voted $3,000 for the purchase of five isolettes bringing the 



total number of isolettes or Chappel beds in the premature ward to twelve. 
This gift, together with the 1948 contribution of the Women's Committee 
which made the new Milk Laboratory possible, has been a tremendous im- 
provement for the hospital. 

NURSING 

In 1949, 307 students were assigned to the Infants' Hospital, for a one- 
month experience in the care of infants. Of the group, forty- three were 
Children's Hospital students. This is an increase of 20 students over the pre- 
ceding year and a still larger number is expected in 1950. In spite of the large 
number of persons assigned to work at Infants' Hospital, there always ap- 
pears to be a need for more. Part of this is attributable to the reduction in 
working hours, but it is also due to the increased activities of the hospital, and 
the complexity of treatments. The more rapid turnover of patients is another 
important factor. 

SOCIAL SERVICE 

In 1949, 186 cases were referred to the Social Service Department as 
against 165 cases in 1948. The mothers of premature infants are visited by a 
public health nurse before their babies come home to investigate physical 
facilities, finances, ability of the mother to care for the baby or the emotional 
attitude of the parents toward the baby. The social worker then contacts the 
mother and assists in whatever way is indicated. Similarly long-term illness 
resulting in prolonged medication at home often requires the assistance of a 
social worker. Other categories in which assistance may be given involve 
convalescent care, assistance in broken homes, emotional tensions or malad- 
justments caused by medical problems, institutional placements of perma- 
nently handicapped children and assistance to improve home care. Other 
family problems may be uncovered by illness and referrals made to other 
agencies for assistance. Out-of-town patients are followed up by agencies such 
as the local Visiting Nurse Association near the families' places of residence. 



GENERAL 

One great improvement in patient care was provided in 1948 by the addi- 
tion of so-called "Hospital Aides". These young ladies provide simple but 
essential and time-consuming services not requiring formal education in 
nursing. 

The services rendered by the Infants' Hospital are of an essential nature, 
not only in research and teaching, but in the care of patients. In two repre- 
sentative weeks, 129 patients sought admission to the General Medical Serv- 
ice of The Children's Medical Center, 77 from Greater Boston, 36 from other 
parts of Massachusetts, and 14 from other states (all but one came from New 
England). Of these 129 patients, 81 or roughly two-thirds were infants. Of 
these, 36 were admitted to the wards of the Infants' Hospital, 5 were taken 
care of in other parts of The Children's Medical Center, 5 had to be referred 
to other hospitals for care, and 6 were examined and sent home. Of the re- 
maining 29 who were not accepted for admission, we do not know how many 
were sent to other hospitals by their physicians on learning that beds were 
not available in our hospital. In any case the demand for Infants' beds re- 
mains high and they are kept as full as the available professional personnel 
permits. 

In this short report, it is impossible to give credit to each member of our 
staff and the members of the Women's Committee for their splendid work, 
but on behalf of the directors, I wish to express our gratitude to the Adminis- 
trator, Dr. Brugler, to Dr. Janeway, as Physician-in-Chief and to all the 
others who give the Infants' Hospital its reputation of which we are all so 
proud. 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH 
President 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL — 1949 



Officers 

President: Arthur G. Rotch 

Treasurer: Lincoln Baylies 

Secretary: John M. Hall 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 
Mrs. William B. Bacon 
Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 
Lincoln Baylies, ex-officio 
Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 
Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 
Hasket Derby 
Charles Devens 
Mrs. Samuel Eliot 
Mrs. Carlyle G. Flake 
Alexander C. Forbes 
Mrs. Thomas B. Gannett 
H. Frederick Hagemann, Jr. 
John M. Hall, ex-officio 
Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 



Directors 

Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 
Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 
Marcien Jenckes 
Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 
Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II 
George v. L. Meyer 

P. A. O'CONNELL 

Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch, ex-officio 
Charles M. Rotch 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Henry K. White 



Administrator of the Hospital 

Guy W. Brugler, M. D. 

Assistant Administrators 

Walter F. Blake 
Lendon Snedeker, M. D. 

Director of Nurses 

Muriel B. Vesey, R. N. 

Physician-in-Chief 

Charles A. Janeway, M. D. 



Infants' Service 

Clement A. Smith, M. D. 



Premature Service 

Stewart H. Clifford, M. D. 



Lincoln Baylies 



Finance Committee 

H. Frederick Hagemann, Jr. 
Henry K. White 



Charles M. Rotch 



Home Furnishings and Buildings and Maintenance Committee 

Arthur G. Rotch, Chairman 

Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 
Mrs. Thomas B. Gannett 

Community Fund Delegates 

Lincoln Baylies Guy W. Brugler, M. D. 

* Assistant Treasurer 

Charles M. Rotch 

Assistant Secretaries 



Charles M. Rotch 



Mrs. Stephen C. Siney, Jr. 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL 
BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1949 

ASSETS 

Assets of general fund: 

Cash $ 33,917.93 

Accounts receivable $149,032.86 

Less: Reserve for bad debts 108,176.45 40,856.41 

Due from United Community Services 2,083.00 

Investments, at cost or at estimated 

market value at time of acquisition 

Bonds and stocks 404,784.38 $481,641.72 

Assets of restricted funds, general: 
Investments, at cost or at estimated 

market value at time of acquisition 
Bonds and stocks 304,110.89 

Assets of restricted funds for designated purposes: 

Cash 6,755.77 

Plant assets: 

Thomas Morgan Rotch, Jr. 
Memorial Hospital: 

Building and equipment 155,788.65 

$948,297.03 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

General fund: 

Due to The Children's Hospital 

for hospital services rendered $ 48,242.49 

Amounts withheld from employees for taxes 18.90 

General fund capital 433,380.33 $481,641.72 

Restricted funds, general: 

Principal of funds 304,110.98 

Restricted funds for designated purposes 6,755.77 

Plant: 

Plant capital 155,788.65 

$948,297.03 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL 
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1948 

Income: 

Hospital revenue $126,756.94 

Income from investments 42,146.48 

Income from trusts 2,545.36 

Total Income $171,448.78 

Expenses: 

Operation of hospital 224,955.29 

Corporation and other expenses 1,710.55 

Total Expenses 226,665.84 

Operating Deficit $55,21 7.06 

Community Fund and 

Direct Contributions 34,432.02 

Portion of above loss to be assumed by 

The Children's Hospital per agreement. 3,783.46 38,215.48 

Net Deficit •. $17,001.58 

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1949 

Income: 

Hospital revenue $126,207.57 

Income from investments 38,995.79 

Income from trusts 2,057.21 

Total Income $167,260.57 

Expenses: 

Operation of hospital 253,784.62 

Corporation and other expenses 2,040.12 

Total Expenses 255,824.74 

Operating Deficit. .: $88,564.17 

Community Fund and 

Direct Contributions 29,304.30 

Portion of above loss to be assumed by 

The Children's Hospital per agreement. 38,592.82 67,897.12 

Net Deficit '."7777777 '$20,667.05 



10 



LEGACIES AND GIFTS ADDED TO CAPITAL 

For General Funds 

1940 , $ 9,500.00 

1941 1,254.50 

1942 600.00 

1943 10,299.10 

1944 11,000.00 

1945 12,597.69 

1946 23,613.42 

1947 34,502,99 

1948 7,001.58 

1949 10,667.05 

For Restricted Funds 

1940 r . . . . $ 201.82 

1941 5,000.00 

1942 27.84 

1943 

1944 

1945 : 

1946 7,512.00 

1947 9,000.00 

1948 

1949 371.98 



1 1 



CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 



TO THE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES 
OF INFANTS' HOSPITAL 



We have examined the balance sheet of Infants' Hospital as of December 31, 1949, 
and the related income statement for the year then ended. Our examination was made 
in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and accordingly included 
such tests of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures as we con- 
sidered necessary in the circumstances. 

In our opinion, the accompanying balance sheet and income statement present 
fairly the financial position of Infants' Hospital at December 31, 1949, and the results 
of its operations for the year then ended, in conformity with generally accepted ac- 
counting principles applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 



Boston, Massachusetts 



Charles F. Rittenhouse & Company 

Certified Public Accountants 



12 



WOMEN'S COMMITTEE OF THE CHILDREN'S MEDICAL CENTER 



Chairman 

Mrs. Francis Parkman 

Vice Chairmen 

Mrs. Roger A. Perry 
Mrs. John A. Blanchard 

Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. Robert H. Hopkins 

Recording Secretary 

Mrs. Wisner P. Kinne 

Treasurer 

Parkman D. Howe 

Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Thomas B. Gannett 

Chairman Infants' Hospital Committee 

Mrs. Parmely W. Herrick 



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15 






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:i» s JiillillIiiiiiii 




INFANTS' HOSPITAL — 1949 
MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION 



Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. 
Mrs. William B. Bacon 
Mrs. Matthew Bartlett 
Nelson S. Bartlett, Jr. 
Lincoln Baylies 
Arthur M. Beale 
Mrs. Stoughton Bell 
Mrs. Edward L. Bigelow 
Mrs. E. A. Boardman 
Mrs. J. Gardner Bradley 
Mrs. Theodore G. Bremer 
Mrs. Edmund J. Burke 

Mrs. John R. Chapin 
Mrs. Robert J. Clark 
Miss E. N. Converse 
Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 
Mrs. E. R. Curtis 
Mrs. Louis Curtis 
Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 



Hasket Derby 
Miss Alice DeFord 
Charles Devens 



Mrs. Samuel Eliot 



Mrs. Carlyle G. Flake 

Alexander C. Forbes 

F. Murray Forbes 

Mrs. Louis A. Frothingham 



Mrs. Thomas B. Gannett 



H. Frederick Hagemann, Jr. 
John M. Hall 
Mrs. John M. Hall 
Mrs. Nathaniel Hamlen 
Mrs. F. L. Higginson 
Mrs. John Homans 
Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 

F. W. HUNNEWELL 



Mrs. Carl F. Kaufmann 
Mrs. Frederick B. Kellogg 
Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II 
Mrs. M. M. Kimball 



Mrs. R. W. Lovett 



George v. L. Meyer 
Mrs. Roger B. Merriman 
Mrs. E. Preble Motley 



Mrs. Roland W. Nickerson 

P. A. O'Connell 

Mrs. Henry W. Palmer 
Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Palmer, Jr. 
Mrs. F. S. Parker 

Mrs. Homer B. Richardson 
Arthur G. Rotch 
Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch 
Charles M. Rotch 

Mrs. S. A. Sargent 
Mrs. Henry R. Scott 
Mrs. Hugh D. Scott 
Mrs. Philip S. Sears 
Robert W. Seymour 
S. Parkman Shaw, Jr. 
Mrs. William Sheafe 
Mrs. G. W. Simmons 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Dr. Richard M. Smith 
Mrs. Carl S. Stillman 

Mrs. Fritz B. Talbot 
Mrs. John F. Tarbell 
Mrs. T. C. Thacker 
Miss E. M. Tower 
Mrs. Henry Tudor 



Mrs. Mary V. Iasigi 
Mrs. James Jackson 
Mrs. James Jackson, Jr. 
Dr. Charles A. Janeway 
Marcien Jenckes 



Mrs. Fiske Warren 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Edwin S. Webster 
Henry K. White 
Mrs. G. H. Windeler 



17 



ACTIVE STAFF 1949-50 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Physician-in-Chief — Charles A. Janeway, M. D. 



GENERAL MEDICINE 

Physicians 

Randolph K. Byers, M. D Chief, Children's Medical Service 

Stewart H. Clifford, M. D Chief, Premature Service 

John A. V. Da vies, M. D Chief, Private Medical Service 

Louis K. Diamond, M. D 

R. Cannon Eley, M. D Chief, Isolation Service 

Henry E. Gallup, M. D Chief, Hospital & Convalescent Home 

Sydney S. Gellis, M. D Chief, Medical Out-Patient Department 

David D. Rutstein, M. D 

Clement A. Smith, M. D Chief, Infants' Hospital 

Harold C. Stuart, M. D 

Edwin T. Wyman, M. D 



Associate Physicians 



Olga E. Allers, M. D. 
William Berenberg, M. D. 
Stanton Garfield, M. D. 
Nathan Gorin, M. D. 
Gerald N. Hoeffel, M. D. 
Theodore H. Ingalls, M. D. 
Dorothea May Moore, M. D. 



Robert T. Moulton, M. D. 
Harry L. Mueller, M. D. 
Harry Shwachman, M. D. 
Lendon Snedeker, M. D. 
Stuart S. Stevenson, M. D. 
William J. Turtle, M. D. 
William M. Wallace, M. D. 



Assistant Physicians 



Fred H. Allen, Jr., M. D. 
John K. Brines, M. D. 
Edward C. Dyer, M. D. 
Albert A. Frank, M. D. 
Elizabeth A. Gregory, M. D. 
Sprague W. Hazard, M. D. 
Allen M. Hill, M. D. 
William H. Horwitz, M. D. 
John P. Hubbell, M. D. 
Lawrence Kingsland, M. D, 
Alexander S. MacDonald, M. D. 
Edward F. McGrath, M. D. 



Donald E. McLean, M. D. 
Jack Metcoff, M. D. 
Lawrence S. Morse, M. D. 
Rose C. Munro, M. D. 
Alexander S. Nadas, M. D. 
Alice Nauen, M. D. 
Joseph Osborne, M. D. 
Mary E. Perry, M. D. 
Dane G. Prugh, M. D. 
Henry M. Putnam, M. D. 
Jacob Wallace, M, D. 
Thomas H. Weller, M. D. 



18 



SPECIAL MEDICAL DIVISIONS 

Metabolism Division 

James L. Gamble, M. D Chief 

William M. Wallace, M. D Associate Physician 

Jack Metcoff, M. D Assistant Physician 

Neurological Division 

Bronson Crothers, M. D Chief 

Randolph K. Byers, M. D Physician 

Edith Meyer, Ph.D Psychologist 

Harriet Hyde Assistant Psychologist 

Seizure Division 

William G. Lennox, M. D Chief 

Edward C. Dyer, M. D Assistant Physician 

Douglas T. Davidson, M. D Assistant Physician 

Allergy Division 

Lewis Webb Hill, M. D Chief 

Nathan Gorin, M. D Associate Physician 

Sidney H. Weiner, M. D Associate Physician 

Alta Ashley, M. D Assistant Physician 

Frederick Blumenthal, M. D Assistant Physician 

William H. Horwitz, M. D Assistant Physician 

Harry L. Mueller, M. D Assistant Physician 

Hematology Division 

Louis K. Diamond, M. D Chief and Director of the Blood Bank 

Fred H. Allen, M. D Research Associate 

Ellsworth A. Twible, M. D Research Assistant 

George W. Dana, M. D Assistant Director of the Blood Bank 

Cardiology Division 

Hyman Green, M. D Associate Chief 

Alexander S. Nadas, M. D Associate Chief 

Albert Cohen, M. D Assistant Physician 

Elizabeth A. Gregory, M. D Assistant Physician 

Marshall B. Kriedberg, M. D Assistant Physician 

Jacob Wallace, M. D Assistant Physician 

James B. Dow, M. D Research Associate 

Rheumatic Fever Division 

Benedict F. Massell, M. D Chief 

James T. Cameron, M. D Assistant Physician 

Sprague W. Hazard, M. D Assistant Physician 

Edward F. McGrath, M. D Assistant Physician 

Lillian F. McMackin, M. D Assistant Physician 



!9 



Child Health Division 

Harold C. Stuart, M. D Chief 

Stanton Garfield, M. D Associate Physician 

Lendon Snedeker, M. D : Associate Physician 

Stuart S. Stevenson, M. D Associate Physician 

William Schmidt, M. D Associate Physician 

Jean Frances Webb, M. D : Assistant Physician 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

GENERAL SURGICAL DIVISION 

Surgeon-in-Chief — Robert E. Gross, M. D. 



Surgeons 

Thomas H. Lanman, M. D. 
Luther A. Longino, M. D. 
Donald W. MacCollum, M. D. 
Orvar Swenson, M. D. 



Associate Surgeons 

Thomas W. Botsford, M. D. 
Chilton Crane, M. D. 
Henry W. Hudson, Jr., M. D. 



Assistant Surgeons 

John W. Chamberlain, M. D. 
Paul F. Ware, M. D. 



SPECIAL SURGICAL DIVISIONS 

Otolaryngological Division 

Carlyle G. Flake, M. D Chief 

Charles F. Ferguson, M. D Associate Otolaryngologist 

Charles I. Johnson, M. D Assistant Otolaryngologist 

Lyman G. Richards, M. D Assistant Otolaryngologist 

Harold G. Tobey, M. D Assistant Otolaryngologist 

Ophthalmological Division 

Trygve Gundersen, M. D Chief 

S. Forrest Martin, M. D Associate Ophthalmologist 

Garrett L. Sullivan, M. D Associate Ophthalmologist 

Joseph M. Clough, M. D Assistant Ophthalmologist 

Sumner D. Liebman, M. D Assistant Ophthalmologist 

Earl S. Seale, M. D Assistant Ophthalmologist 

Dental Division 

Paul K. Losch, D.D.S. — Chief 

Dentistry 

Paul K. Losch, D.D.S Stomatologist 

David Weisberger, M. D., D. M. D Associate Stomatologist 

Harry Bailey, D. M. D Assistant Stomatologist 

Charles Campelia, D. M. D Assistant Stomatologist 

Paul Gilpatric, D.M.D Assistant Stomatologist 

Abraham Kaner, D. M. D Assistant Stomatologist 



20 



Orthodontia 

Edward I. Silver, D. M. D Associate Orthodontist 

Charles M. Waldo, D.D.S Associate Orthodontist 

Henry Beebe, D. D. S Assistant Orthodontist 

Melvin I. Cohen, D. M. D Assistant Orthodontist 

Abijah Pierce, D. M. D Assistant Orthodontist 

Emory Farrington, D. M. D Assistant Orthodontist 

Maurice Dinnerman, D. M. D Assistant Oral Pathologist 

Esther S. Shapiro Speech Correctionist 

Anesthesia Division 

Robert M. Smith, M. D Anesthesiologist 

DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON-IN-CHIEF — William T. Green, M. D. 



Orthopedic Surgeons 

Albert H. Brewster, M. D. 
David Grice, M. D. 
Robert H. Morris, M. D. 



Associate Orthopedic Surgeons 

Thomas Gucker, 3rd, M. D. 
Paul Hugenberger, M. D. 
Meier G. Karp, M. D. 



Assistant Orthopedic Surgeons 

William Elliston, M. D. 

John G. Kuhns, M. D. 

Charles L. Sturdevant, M. D. 

DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY 

E. B. D. Neuhauser, M. D Radiologist-in-Chief 

Martin Wittenborg, M. D Associate Radiologist 

DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSURGERY 

Franc D. Ingraham, M. D Neurosurgeon-in-Chief 

Donald D. Matson, M. D Associate Neurosurgeon 

DEPARTMENT OF LABORATORIES AND RESEARCH 

Sidney Farber, M.D. — Chairman 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Sidney Farber, M. D Pathologist-in-Chief 

Orville T. Bailey, M. D Neuropathologist 

Israel Diamond, M. D Assistant Pathologist 

J. LeRoy Conel, Ph.D Research Associate 

George Foley, B. S Research Associate 

Lawrence Kingsland, M. D Research Associate 

Harry Shwachman, M. D., Chief 

Research Division of Chemistry, Research Division of Clinical Pathology 

John Enders, Ph.D., Chief Research Division of Infectious Diseases 

Thomas Weller, M. D., Assistant Chief Research Division of Infectious Diseases 

S. Burt Wolbach, M. D., Chief Research Division of Nutrition 

Charlotte Maddock, M. D., Research Associate Research Division of Nutrition 



21 



CONSULTANTS 



Donald L. Augustine, M. D. 

Comparative Pathology 

J. Lewis Bremer, M. D Embryology 

C. Sidney Bur well, M. D Medicine 

Allan M. Butler, M. D Medicine 

Paul Chandler, M. D. . . . Ophthalmology 
Austin W. Cheever, M. D. . Dermatology 
David G. Cogan, M. D. . . . Ophthalmology 
Edwin B. Dunphy, M.D. . .Ophthalmology 

Albert B. Ferguson, M. D Radiology 

Jacob Fine, M. D Anesthesiology 

Chester N. Frazier, M. D. . . Dermatology 
J. Roswell Gallagher, M. D. Medicine 
George E. Gardner, M. D. . .Psychiatry 
J. Hartwell Harrison, M. D. . . Urology 
A. Baird Hastings, M. D. 

Biological Chemistry 
T. Duckett Jones, M. D Medicine 



Otto Krayer, M. D Pharmacology 

Eugene M. Landis, M. D Physiology 

Francis D. Moore, M. D Surgery 

J. Howard Mueller, M. D. . Bacteriology 

Francis C. Newton, M. D Surgery 

Leroy A. Schall, M. D. . . Otolaryngology 

Murray Shear, M. D Biochemistry 

Merrill C. Sosman, M. D. . .Radiology 

George W. Thorn, M. D Medicine 

Frederick H. Verhoeff, M. D. 

Ophthalmology 

Shields Warren, M. D Pathology 

Carl W. Walter, M..D Surgery 

Conrad Wesselhoeft, M. D. 

Infectious Diseases 
James L. Whittenberger, M. D. 

Physiology 
George Wislocki, M. D Anatomy 



EMERITI 

George Cutler, M. D. 
William E. Ladd, M. D. 
Charles G. Mixter, M. D. 
Frank R. Ober, M. D. 
Robert B. Osgood, M. D. 
James W. Sever, M. D. 
Richard M. Smith, M. D. 
Philip H. Sylvester, M. D. 



22 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



To the Corporation: 

I give and bequeath to the Infants' Hospital, 
a corporation established under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 



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